Marshall, Virginia

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Marshall
Census-designated place (CDP)
Marshall is located in Virginia
Marshall
Marshall
Location within the state of Virginia
Coordinates: 38°51′53″N 77°51′28″W / 38.86472°N 77.85778°W / 38.86472; -77.85778Coordinates: 38°51′53″N 77°51′28″W / 38.86472°N 77.85778°W / 38.86472; -77.85778
Country United States
State Virginia
County Fauquier
Population (2010)
 • Total 1,480
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)

Marshall is a census-designated place (CDP) in northwestern Fauquier County, Virginia. The population as of the 2010 Census was 1,480.[1] Marshall was originally known as Salem. It became Marshall after a short-lived incorporation. Marshall is named after John Marshall, the former United States Supreme Court Chief Justice who grew up at Oak Hill in nearby Delaplane.

Marshall is centered along State Route 55 between two exits on Interstate 66. Although Marshall has historically been an agricultural community, its designation as one of nine service districts within Fauquier County, and the only one in northern Fauquier County, has resulted in a unique set of business and professional service offerings to the mostly equestrian and agricultural interests in the surrounding region.

Marshall is home to the Fauquier Heritage and Preservation Foundation, as well as the Number 18 School in Marshall, which was the last one-room school in Fauquier County. Originally a whites-only schoolhouse, it was a blacks-only schoolhouse until it closed in the 1960s as a result of desegregation. It has been restored and school groups often visit.

Marshall is also home to the oldest continually operating Ford automobile dealership in the US; it has been in the same building since 1915.

The Ashville Historic District, Marshall Historic District, Morgantown Historic District, Number 18 School in Marshall, and Waveland are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Virginia Trend Report 2: State and Complete Places (Sub-state 2010 Census Data). Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed 2011-06-08.
  2. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 

External links[edit]