Martha H. Tingey

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Martha H. Tingey
Photo of Martha H. Tingey
2nd general president of the Young Women
April 1905 – April 1929
Predecessor Elmina Shepard Taylor
Successor Ruth May Fox
End reason Own request for release due to ill heath.
Second Counselor of the
general presidency of the Young Women
1880 – 1904
Called by Elmina Shepard Taylor
Successor Mae Taylor Nystrom
Personal details
Born Martha Jane Horne
(1857-10-15)October 15, 1857
Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, United States
Died March 11, 1938(1938-03-11) (aged 80)
Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Cause of death Cerebral hemorrhage
Resting place Salt Lake City Cemetery
40°46′37″N 111°51′29″W / 40.777°N 111.858°W / 40.777; -111.858 (Salt Lake City Cemetery)
Spouse Joseph S. Tingey
Children 7
Parents Joseph Horne
Mary I. Hales
Website Martha H. Tingey

Martha Jane Horne Tingey (October 15, 1857 – March 11, 1938) was the second general president of the Young Ladies' Mutual Improvement Association (YLMIA) of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1905 to 1929. She spent a total of 49 years as a member of the general presidency.

Biography[edit]

Martha Jane Horne was born in Salt Lake City, Utah Territory. In 1880, as a single 22 year old, Horne was asked to become the second counselor to Elmina Shepard Taylor in the YLMIA. Horne served in this capacity for 24 years. During her time as a counselor to Taylor, Horne married Joseph S. Tingey.

On December 6, 1904, Taylor died. Early in 1905, Tingey was selected as Taylor's successor as the general president of what by then had been renamed the Young Ladies' Mutual Improvement Association. Tingey's counselors in the presidency included Ruth May Fox and Lucy Grant Cannon, both of whom would go on to serve as presidents of the YLMIA. In 1929, Tingey was released from her position as president and was succeeded by Fox, her first counselor. Tingey had been a member of the general presidency from age 22 to age 72.

During her tenure as president, the YLMIA instituted yearly slogans, roadshows, the Beehive program, and camps for young women. In 1922, Tingey selected green and gold as the organization's official colors.

Tingey died in Salt Lake City from a cerebral hemorrhage.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Martha Tingey death certificate". Utah State Archives. 

References[edit]

  • Janet Peterson and LaRene Gaunt (1993). Keepers of the Flame: General Presidents of the Young Women (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book)
  • Susa Young Gates (1911). History of the Young Ladies' Mutual Improvement Association (Salt Lake City: Deseret News)
  • Jenson, Andrew (1936). [Latter-day Saint biographical encyclopedia]]: A compilation of biographical sketches of prominent men and women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 4. Salt Lake City, Utah: The Andrew Jenson Memorial Association (Printed by The Deseret News Press). pp. 74–75. 
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints titles
Preceded by
Elmina Shepard Taylor
President of the Young Women
April 1905 – April 1929
Succeeded by
Ruth May Fox
First Second Counselor of the general
presidency of the Young Women

1880 – 1904
Succeeded by
Mae Taylor Nystrom