Martin & Hall

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Martin & Hall was the architectural partnership of Frank W. Martin (March 9, 1863 – February 2, 1917)[1] and George F. Hall (1866–1928).[2] It was based in Providence, RI, USA. The firm was founded in February of 1893 when the two architects, who were both designers in the firm of Stone, Carpenter & Willson, decided to leave and open their own practice. However, they took some commissions with them, resulting in a rift between theirs in their own firm.[2] When Martin died in 1917, Hall continued in private practice.[2] When he died in 1928 he was serving as the supervising architect for the second Industrial Trust Co. Building in downtown Providence, Rhode Island.[2] Originally located in the first Industrial Trust Co. Building at 49 Westminster, they moved in 1901 to the still-standing Union Trust Co. Building, both of which were designed by Stone, Carpenter & Willson.

Works[edit]

In Providence, Rhode Island:

  • Sarah E. Usher Duplex, 2-4 Rhode Island Ave., Providence, RI (1893)[3]
  • St. Maria's Home for Working Girls, 125 Governor St., Providence, RI (1893) - Now apartments.[4]
  • Elbert E. White House, 214 Olney St., Providence, RI (1894)[5]
  • Leander R. Peck House, 184 Knight St., Providence, RI (1894) - Demolished.[6]
  • Mary A. Banigan House, 190 Wayland Ave., Providence, RI (1894) - Demolished.[7]
  • M. A. Frances Fisher Duplex, 15-17 Diman Pl., Providence, RI (1894)[8]
  • M. Helen Potter House, 198 Waterman St., Providence, RI (1894)[9]
  • Museum of Natural History, Roger Williams Park, Providence, RI (1894)[10]
  • William H. Low Jr. House, 243 Knight St., Providence, RI (1894)[11]
  • St. Francis Xavier Academy, 60 Broad St., Providence, RI (1894) - Now Xavier Hall of Johnson & Wales University.[12]
  • Champlin Building, 291 Weybosset St., Providence, RI (1895) - Demolished.[13]
  • Greeley Street Primary School, 45 Greeley St., Providence, RI (1895)[14]
  • Joseph Banigan House, 500 Angell St., Providence, RI (1895) - Demolished.[15]
  • Rhode Island Normal School, 199 Promenade St., Providence, RI (1895) - Demolished, now the site of Providence Place.[16]
  • Broad Street Grammar School, 1450 Broad St., Providence, RI (1896)[17]
  • Classical High School, 124 Pond St., Providence, RI (1896) - Demolished.[18]
  • Dalrymple Boathouse, Roger Williams Park, Providence, RI (1896)[19]
  • Hope Street High School, 331 Hope St., Providence, RI (1897) - Replaced by Hope High School and demolished.[20]
  • Nathan B. Barton House, 63 Orchard Ave., Providence, RI (1897)[21]
  • Walter A. Peck House, 113 Waterman St., Providence, RI (1897) - Demolished.[22]
  • William H. Low Building, 229 Westminster St., Providence, RI (1897)[23]
  • Winslow Building, 183 Mathewson St., Providence, RI (1897)[24]
  • Alice Building, 250 Westminster St., Providence, RI (1898)[25]
  • Parish House & Rectory of St. Joseph's R. C. Church, 92 Hope St., Providence, RI (1898)[26]
  • Frank H. Martin House, 43 Orchard Ave., Providence, RI (1899) - The home of the architect.[27]
  • George C. Lyon House, 93 Arlington Ave., Providence, RI (1899)[28]
  • George F. Hall House, 49 Orchard Ave., Providence, RI (1899) - The home of the architect.[29]
  • Robert Grieve House, 109 Princeton Ave., Providence, RI (1899)[30]
  • Webster Memorial Guildhouse of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, 114 George St., Providence, RI (1899)[31][32]
  • Abbie M. Potter House, 257 Olney St., Providence, RI (1900)[33]
  • Frederick A. Ballou House, 366 Olney St., Providence, RI (1900)[34]
  • Walter L. Preston House, 249 Hope St., Providence, RI (1900)[35]
  • Central Fire Station, 1 Exchange Ter., Providence, RI (1901) - Demolished.[36]
  • Irons & Russel Co. Factory, 95 Chestnut St., Providence, RI (1903)[37]
  • Shepard Co. Dept. Store, 255 Westminster St. & 80 Washington St., Providence, RI (1903) - The Westminster side was a remodeling, and the Washington side was new.[38]
  • Receiving Tomb, North Burial Ground, Providence, RI (1903)[39]
  • Lexington Avenue Grammar School, 57 Lexington Ave., Providence, RI (1905) - Demolished.[40]
  • Webster Avenue Grammar School, 191 Webster Ave., Providence, RI (1905)[41]
  • Harkness Building, 46 Aborn St., Providence, RI (1906)[42]
  • Branch Avenue Primary School, 425 Branch Ave., Providence, RI (1909)[43]
  • Emma K. Jewett House, 259 Wayland Ave., Providence, RI (1909)[44]
  • Providence City Hospital, 151 Eaton St., Providence, RI (1910) - Later renamed Charles V. Chapin Hospital, now part of Providence College.[45]
  • Edwin A. Smith Building, 1 Fulton St., Providence, RI (1912)[46]
  • Kinsley Building, 334 Westminster St., Providence, RI (1912)[47]
  • Remodeling, Narragansett Hotel, 93 Dorrance St., Providence, RI (1912) - In 1912, this was the grandest hotel in Rhode Island. Demolished.[48]
  • Comfort Station, in front of 220 Weybosset St., Providence, RI (1913)[49]
  • Comfort Station, Kennedy Plaza, Providence, RI (1913) - Now part of the bus terminal.[50]
  • Manton Avenue Public Bath, 225 Manton Ave., Providence, RI (1914)[51]
  • Quaid Street Public Bath, Quaid St., Providence, RI (1914) - This building, its street, and its neighborhood have all been lost. It was in the vicinity of Randall Square.[52]
  • Robert J. B. Sullivan House, 350 Wayland Ave., Providence, RI (1914)[53]
  • O'Connor Apartments, 234-242 President Ave., Providence, RI (1916)[54]

In other parts of Rhode Island:

  • Eastman Hall, East Greenwich Academy, 111 Peirce St., East Greenwich, RI (1896) - Demolished[55]
  • Bristol Y.M.C.A., 450 Hope St., Bristol, RI (1898) - Wallis E. Howe was the architect-in-charge.[56]
  • Squantum Association, 1 Squantum Rd., Riverside, RI (1899)[57]
  • Dreadnaught Fire Station, 72 Church St., Bristol, RI (1900)[58]
  • Service Building, Rhode Island Hospital for Mental Diseases, 10 Howard Ave., Howard, RI (1903)[59]
  • Belton Court, 27 Middle Hwy., Barrington, RI (1905) - Built for Frederick S. Peck.[60]
  • Rectory of St. Patrick's R. C. Church, 45 Harrisville Main St., Harrisville, RI (1905)[61]
  • Cottage, Oaklawn School for Girls, 18 Brayton Ave., Oaklawn, RI (1906) - Demolished.[62]
  • Esmond School, 50 Esmond St., Esmond, RI (1909) - Now the East Smithfield Public Library.[63]
  • Reception Hospital, Rhode Island Hospital for Mental Diseases, West Rd. & Howard Ave., Howard, RI (1910) - Vacant and deteriorating.[64]
  • Superintendent's House, Rhode Island State Almshouse, 1510 Pontiac Ave., Howard, RI (1910) - Demolished.[65]
  • Industrial School, Sockanosset School for Boys, Sockanosset Cross Rd. & New London Ave., Howard, RI - Demolished.[66]
  • Leander R. Peck Memorial High School, 281 County Rd., Barrington, RI (1916) - Now used as the public library.[67]
  • Yellow Patch, 115 Central St., Narragansett Pier, RI (1916) - A house for Kate L. Richardson.[68]

In Massachusetts:

  • St. John's Episcopal Church, 80 Lexington St., East Boston, MA (1897) - Now East Boston APAC Headstart.[69]
  • Casino, Capron Park, Attleboro, MA (1902)[70]
  • Kennedy Building, 142 Main St., Brockton, MA (1916)[71]

In Connecticut:

Style[edit]

Stylistically, Martin & Hall were very typical. They were very capable, but not very original. They favored the popular styles of the day: the Colonial and Gothic Revivals. When faced with a major civic commission, they would use an aggrandizing Beaux-Arts design.

Their commercial buildings ar among their most refined, the Shepard and Smith Buildings in particular. The Smith, especially, used a very sophisticated interpretation of the Chicago School, in the manner of Holabird & Roche.

Other than this, the work of Martin & Hall trends toward wooden residences, usually Colonial Revival. Though plain and unremarkable, they add to the essence of the city.

Associated Architects[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Page 299, The Technology Review, Vol. XIX (1917)
  2. ^ a b c d Buildings on Paper, William H. Jordy, 1982
  3. ^ Blackstone Park Historic District NRHP Nomination (1998)
  4. ^ Page 116, The Engineering Record (July 15, 1893)
  5. ^ Page 6, The American Architect & Building News (October 6, 1894)
  6. ^ Page 309, The Engineering Record (April 7, 1894)
  7. ^ Page xiv, The American Architect and Building News (November 4, 1893)
  8. ^ Page 170, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  9. ^ Page 50, The Engineering Record (June 16, 1894)
  10. ^ Page 292, The Engineering Record (September 30, 1893)
  11. ^ Page 194, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  12. ^ Page 49, The Engineering Record (June 16, 1894)
  13. ^ Page 56, Downtown Providence Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  14. ^ Page ix, The Engineering Record (July 27, 1895)
  15. ^ Page xvi, The American Architect and Building News (March 30, 1895)
  16. ^ Page ix, The Engineering Record (June 15, 1895)
  17. ^ Page ix, The Engineering Record (November 23, 1895)
  18. ^ Page ix, The Engineering Record (November 23, 1895)
  19. ^ Page 178, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  20. ^ Page 218, Supplement, Engineering News (December 17, 1896)
  21. ^ Page 90, Historic and Architectural Resources of the East Side, Providence: A Preliminary Report (RIHPC, 1989)
  22. ^ Page xv, The American Architect and Building News (August 28, 1897)
  23. ^ Page 239, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  24. ^ Page xv, The American Architect & Building News (November 14, 1896)
  25. ^ Pages 239-240, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  26. ^ Page 187, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  27. ^ Page 89, Historic and Architectural Resources of the East Side, Providence: A Preliminary Report (RIHPC, 1989)
  28. ^ Page 136, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  29. ^ Page 90, Historic and Architectural Resources of the East Side, Providence: A Preliminary Report (RIHPC, 1989)
  30. ^ Page 216, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  31. ^ Page 183, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  32. ^ http://www.sstephens.org/Building.html
  33. ^ Page 86, Historic and Architectural Resources of the East Side, Providence: A Preliminary Report (RIHPC, 1989)
  34. ^ Page 88, Historic and Architectural Resources of the East Side, Providence: A Preliminary Report (RIHPC, 1989)
  35. ^ Page 188, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  36. ^ Page 29, Sixth Annual Report of the Board of Fire Commissioners for 1900 (1901)
  37. ^ Page 163, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  38. ^ Page 240, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  39. ^ Page 150, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  40. ^ Page 86, Annual Report of the State Board of Education, January, 1906 (1906)
  41. ^ Page 86, Annual Report of the State Board of Education, January, 1906 (1906)
  42. ^ Page 30, Downtown Providence Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  43. ^ Page 42c, The Engineering Record (December 12, 1908)
  44. ^ Page 236, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  45. ^ Page 174, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  46. ^ Page 174, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  47. ^ Page 43, Downtown Providence Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  48. ^ Page 484, Stone (September, 1912)
  49. ^ Page 244, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  50. ^ Page 73, The American Contractor (July 5, 1913)
  51. ^ Page 14, Resolutions and Ordinances of the City Council of the City of Providence, 1914 (1914)
  52. ^ age 14, Resolutions and Ordinances of the City Council of the City of Providence, 1914 (1914)
  53. ^ http://www.pbn.com/PPS-honors-6-houses-with-Historic-Property-Markers,29554?print=1
  54. ^ Page 80, The American Contractor (June 3, 1916)
  55. ^ Page xix, The American Architect and Building News (April 4, 1896)
  56. ^ Page xiii, The American Architect and Building News (August 14, 1897)
  57. ^ Page 444, Buildings of Rhode Island (William H. Jordy, 2004)
  58. ^ Page 75, Historic and Architectural Resources of Bristol, Rhode Island (RIHPC, 1990)
  59. ^ Page 265, Annual Report of the State Auditor (1905)
  60. ^ Pages 68-69, Historic and Architectural Resources of Barrington, Rhode Island (RISPC, 1993)
  61. ^ Harrisville Mill Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  62. ^ Page 11, Annual Report of the Board of State Charities and Corrections, 1906 (1907)
  63. ^ Page 63, Annual Report of the State Board of Education, January, 1910 (1910)
  64. ^ Page 12, Annual Report of the Board of State Charities and Corrections, 1911 (1910)
  65. ^ Page 12, Annual Report of the Board of State Charities and Corrections, 1911 (1910)
  66. ^ Page 12, Annual Report of the Board of State Charities and Corrections, 1911 (1910)
  67. ^ Page 73, The American Contractor (May 6, 1916)
  68. ^ Page 70, The American Contractor (June 24, 1916)
  69. ^ Page iii, The American Architect and Building News (September 25, 1897)
  70. ^ http://mhc-macris.net/Details.aspx?MhcId=ATT.411
  71. ^ Page 81, The American Contractor (June 3, 1916)
  72. ^ Page 649, The Churchman (November 16, 1901)

Additional Links[edit]