Martin Eichenbaum

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Martin S. Eichenbaum
Born (1954-08-23) 23 August 1954 (age 60)
Nationality Canadian American
Institution Northwestern University
Field Macroeconomics
Alma mater University of Minnesota
McGill University
Information at IDEAS / RePEc

Martin Stewart Eichenbaum (born August 23, 1954) is the Charles Moskos professor of Economics at Northwestern University, and the co-director of the Center for International Economics and Development. His research focuses on macroeconomics, international economics, and monetary theory and policy.

Biography[edit]

After graduating from McGill University (B.Comm. in Economics, 1976) and the University of Minnesota (Ph.D. Economics, 1981) he served as an assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University before moving to Northwestern University in 1988. He is currently the Charles Moskos professor of Economics at Northwestern University and in addition the co-director of the Center for International Economics and Development there. During his career he also taught at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Chicago, and the University of Pennsylvania. In addition, he has been a consultant to the Federal Reserve Banks of Chicago, Atlanta, and San Francisco.

Eichenbaum is married to Yona and has two children.

Contributions[edit]

Eichenbaums's research focuses on macroeconomics, international economics, and monetary theory and policy. Specifically, he has been concerned with understanding aggregate economic fluctuations, studying the causes and consequences of exchange rate fluctuations, as well as the effect of monetary policy on postwar United States business cycles.

Selected Papers[edit]

Associations[edit]

Eichenbaum was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2013.[1] He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He served as the co-editor of the American Economic Review from 2011 to 2015. He is now the co-editor of the NBER Macro Annual. [2] In addition, he is on the Board of Directors of the Bank of Montreal. [3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New 2013 American Academy Members by Class and Section" (PDF). American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 23 April 2013. 
  2. ^ "NBER Macroeconomics Annual". The National Bureau of Economic Research. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  3. ^ "Bank of Montreal Announces Election of Directors". BMO Financial Group. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 

External links[edit]