Martin Felsen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search


Martin Felsen
Martin Felsen of UrbanLab.jpg
Martin Felsen, UrbanLab
Born 1968 (age 45–46)
Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S.
Nationality American
Alma mater Virginia Tech (B.Arch., 1991), Columbia University (M.S., 1994)
Awards 2009 Latrobe Prize

Martin Felsen (born 1968 in Silver Spring, Maryland) is an American architect. He directs UrbanLab, a Chicago-based architecture and urban design firm. Felsen's projects range in scale from houses such as the Hennepin, Illinois Residence,[1][2] mixed-use residential and commercial buildings such as Upton’s Naturals Headquarters,[3][4] public open spaces such as the Smart Museum of Art Courtyard [5][6] at the University of Chicago, and large scale, speculative urban design projects such as Growing Water in Chicago.[7][8] Felsen was awarded the 2009 Latrobe Prize [9] by the American Institute of Architects, College of Fellows.

Biography[edit]

Felsen earned his Bachelor of Architecture from the Virginia Tech in 1991 and a Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design from Columbia University in 1994.[10] Prior to founding his own firm, he worked for Peter Eisenman,[11] Stan Allen,[12] and OMA/Rem Koolhaas in Rotterdam.[13] Felsen’s work has been exhibited at the International Venice Biennale of Architecture, the Museum of Modern Art, the National Building Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago. Felsen has been featured in publications such as Architect magazine [14] and Dwell magazine. He has received many honors for his work, including several design awards from the American Institute of Architects.

Since 1996, Felsen has taught architecture and urban design as a Studio Associate Professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology.[15] He was a visiting professor at Washington University in St. Louis in 2011.[16] Felsen served as Director of Archeworks,[17] an alternative design school in Chicago from 2008-11.[18] Under his leadership, Archeworks completed several significant public interest design projects,[19] and developed and organized two influential urban design workshops titled Infrastructures for Change.[20] During Felsen’s tenure, Archeworks’ projects were exhibited internationally at the Venice Biennale of Architecture [21] and The Architecture Foundation in London.[22] Felsen founded and served as editor of a new Archeworks publication titled Works.[23]

Awards and honors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ryan Blitstein (November 2009). "New Grass Roots". Dwell magazine. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  2. ^ "Hennepin House". UrbanLab. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  3. ^ Elaine Coorens (02-06-2013). "Grand Ave New Home of an Instant Building in West Town". Our Urban Times. Retrieved 2014-04-25.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  4. ^ "Upton’s Naturals". UrbanLab. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  5. ^ "Sculpture Garden and Reception Hall". University of Chicago. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  6. ^ "Courtyard at the Smart Museum". UrbanLab. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  7. ^ David Sokol (2008-09-29). "Momentum Grows for Futuristic Scheme". Architectural Record. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  8. ^ "Growing Water". UrbanLab. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  9. ^ Matt Tinder (August 11, 2010). "AIA College of Fellows announces winner of 2009 Latrobe Prize". Building Design+Construction. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  10. ^ Paul Makovsky (December 1999). "Tschumi Steps Down". Metropolis (architecture magazine). Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  11. ^ "Profile of Peter Eisenman". Yale School of Architecture. Retrieved 2014-04-24. 
  12. ^ Princeton University: Stan Allen profile, retrieved 19 February 2014
  13. ^ "Faculty Bio". Harvard University Graduate School of Design. 
  14. ^ Ernest Beck (January 17, 2012). "UrbanLab". Architect magazine. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  15. ^ "IIT Faculty: Martin Felsen". Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  16. ^ "Sam Fox School, Master’s of Urban Design Studio". Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  17. ^ "Archeworks". Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  18. ^ Blair Kamin (January 17, 2008). "Alternative design school". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  19. ^ "Archeworks Project Archive". Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  20. ^ Metropolitan Planning Council. "Infrastructures for Change Workshop 2010 – Great Lakes Model". Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  21. ^ "Workshopping at the 2010 Venice Biennale". Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  22. ^ "Critical Infrastructures at The Architecture Foundation, London". Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  23. ^ "Works 01". Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  24. ^ "AIA Awards". 2014. Retrieved 2014-11-05. 
  25. ^ "AIA Awards". 2014. Retrieved 2014-11-05. 
  26. ^ "AIA Awards". 2013. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  27. ^ Jayne Merkel (June 19, 2012). "Preview: Americans in Venice". Architectural Record. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  28. ^ "AIA Awards". 2011. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  29. ^ "AIA Awards". 2010. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  30. ^ "2010 Buckminster Fuller Challenge Finalists". Bustler.net. April 29, 2010. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  31. ^ Julie Iovine (2010-03-03). "UrbanLab". The Architect's Newspaper. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  32. ^ "Workshopping at the 2010 Venice Biennale". Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  33. ^ "AIA Awards". 2009. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  34. ^ "AIA Awards". 2009. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  35. ^ Matt Tinder (August 11, 2010). "AIA College of Fellows announces winner of 2009 Latrobe Prize". Building Design+Construction. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  36. ^ "Global Visionaries WBEZ Press Release". March 2, 2009. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  37. ^ "AIA Awards". 2008. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  38. ^ Blair Kamin (December 12, 2007). "Pitt making celebrity work for homes". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  39. ^ "AIA Awards". 2007. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  40. ^ Robin Pogrebin (February 9, 2007). "Chicago Firm Urban Design Winner". New York Times. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 

External links[edit]

  • [1] UrbanLab’s official website