Martin Mill railway station

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Martin Mill National Rail
Martin Mill
Martin Mill station
Location
Place Martin Mill
Local authority Dover
Grid reference TR341466
Operations
Station code MTM
Managed by Southeastern
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2004/05   32,990
2005/06 Increase 33,521
2006/07 Increase 38,199
2007/08 Increase 40,692
2008/09 Decrease 39,936
2009/10 Decrease 30,692
2010/11 Decrease 28,604
2011/12 Increase 29,836
2012/13 Increase 30,254
History
Key dates Opened 17 June 1881 (17 June 1881)
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Martin Mill from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
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Martin Mill railway station serves the very small village of Martin Mill in East Kent. The station and all trains serving it are operated by Southeastern. The booking office is now open only for very limited hours on Mondays to Fridays mornings but a Permit To Travel ticket machine on the Dover-bound platform caters for out-of-hours ticketing.

Service[edit]

As of November 2011 the typical off-peak service from the station is one train per hour to Ramsgate and one train per hour to London Charing Cross via Dover Priory and Sevenoaks.[1]

As of January 2015 the typical off-peak service will be one train per hour to St Pancras International via Dover Priory and Ashford International and one train per hour to St Pancras aswell but via Ramsgate, Herne Bay, Whitstable, Chatham and Gravesend instead.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Dover Priory   Southeastern
Kent Coast Line
  Walmer

History[edit]

Martin Mill also served as an important station during both the First and Second World Wars. During the construction of Dover Harbour in 1897 a single track branch was constructed to bring in materials from Martin Mill. The track ran over the surface of the high chalk plateau parallel with the Dover-Deal main line, before climbing up to the summit just at the entrance to Guston tunnel. From there, it ascended to the cliff top, 350 ft above sea level. It then descended in a zig-zag formation on a vertiginous shelf which was cut into the cliff, leading down to the eastern part of the harbour. The route was reopened during both wars, and operated mainly by Royal Engineers to deploy mounted artillery on the cliff edge.[2] During the Second World War, the branch served the many gun batteries along the white cliffs between Dover and St Margarets. Along this track ran two track-mounted 14 inch guns/cannons nicknamed Winnie (after Winston Churchill) and Pooh (after the fictional bear). During the war they fired into France at German targets, but accuracy was a problem and more damage was done to local property than their actual targets.[3]

This line also ran down to Dover Harbour along a cliff road.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Table 207 National Rail timetable, December 2011
  2. ^ White, H.P. (1987). Forgotten Railways: South-East England (Forgotten Railways Series). Newton Abbott, Devon: David & Charles. pp. 137–138, 158–159. ISBN 0-946537-37-2. 
  3. ^ The Coastguard

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°10′16″N 1°20′53″E / 51.171°N 1.348°E / 51.171; 1.348