Martin Sacks

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Martin Colin Sacks
Born (1959-10-16) 16 October 1959 (age 55)
Sydney, Australia
Occupation Actor, director
Spouse(s) Kate Sacks (née Allen)
Awards 1998–2002: Silver Logie award for Most Popular Actor – for his role as PJ Hasham in Blue Heelers

Martin Colin Sacks (born 16 October 1959, Sydney) is an award-winning Australian actor, chiefly known for his 12-year role on Blue Heelers from 1993–2005.

Career[edit]

Sacks first got into acting after a bit part in an episode of The Love Boat when it was filming in the Pacific. His first role came about in the series The Restless Years in the late 1970s, which started him on the television circuit in Australia. He emigrated to Hollywood in the 1980s, guest starring in series such as thirtysomething, but preferred Australia, and so he returned there after a few years. Also had guest appearances in: Love in Limbo, Encounters, Irresistible Force, Fields of Fire III, All the Way, Touch the Sun: Princess Kate, Slate, Wyn & Me, Tricheuse, La, Emoh Ruo, Stock Squad and The City's Edge.

Against his first instinct, Sacks took the role of Detective P.J. Hasham in the 1993 series Blue Heelers. The show rocketed him to fame, most notably his 7-year "will-they-or-won't-they" relationship with Constable Maggie Doyle (Lisa McCune) which ended with her death in the programme's seventh season.

During the time he starred on the show, Sacks married Kate and had two children, Jack and Ned and had leading roles in two major Australian miniseries: Do or Die and My Husband My Killer (both 2001).

After playing P.J. for twelve years, and being one of only three original cast still on the show in the twelfth season, Sacks left Blue Heelers to spend time with his growing family. His last episode aired on 10 August 2005. Sacks expressly asked the producers not to kill his character, so that he could return for a guest spot in the future. He did not get the chance, however: the show was cancelled in early 2006.

Sacks is also a director, having directed episodes of Blue Heelers, All Saints and a short film called Crushed.

Sacks also starred in the 2008 Australian TV hit, Underbelly, portraying underworld loanshark Mario Condello. In 2010, Sacks guest starred in three different shows – City Homicide, Rescue: Special Ops and Sea patrol.

Filmography[edit]

As Actor[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1977 The Restless Years Adam Lee
1982-1984 A Country Practice Craig Thompson/Philby 6 Episodes
1985 Stock Squad
Emoh Ruo Des. Tunkley
1987 La tricheuse Jeff
Slate, Wyn & Me Slate Jackson
1988 Touch the Sun: Princess Kate Greg Mathieson
All the Way Alan Scott
1989 Field of Fire III Rinaldo
1990 thirtysomething Assistant Director Season 3, Episode 22
Jake and the Fatman Halsey Reed Season 4, Episode 5
1993 Encounters Martin Carr
Irresistible Force Bomb Squad Officer
Love in Limbo Max Wiseman
Police Rescue Lloyd Cooper Season 3, Episode 4
2001 The Rubicon Jimmy Grattan
My Husband My Killer Andrew Kalajzich
1993-2005 Blue Heelers Senior Detective Patrick Joseph "P.J." Hasham 484 Episodes
2008 Underbelly Mario Condello 11 Episodes
The Strip Keith Boswell Season 1, Episode 5
2009 East of Everything Toby Ferrani Season 2, Episode 7
2010 Lowdown Tony Marino Season 1, Episode 7
City Homicide Daniel Worthington Season 3, Episode 22
Sea Patrol Derek Cavanaugh Season 4, Episode 16
Rescue Special Ops Charles Howard Season 2, Episode 12
Offspring Colin Soriel 2 Episodes
2011 The Cup Neil Pinner
2012 The Straits Howard Reeman 2 Episodes
Bait Todd
Rake Roger Cross 6 Episodes
2013-2014 Wentworth Derek Channing 6 Episodes
A Place to Call Home Itzaak Goldberg 3 Episodes

As Director[edit]

Year Title Notes
2005-2006 Blue Heelers 3 Episodes
2006-2008 All Saints 6 Episodes

Awards[edit]

Year Award Category Film Result
1996 Logie Award Most Popular Actor Blue Heelers Nominated
1997[1] Won
1998[2] Won
1999[3] Won
2000[4] Won
2001[5] Won

External links[edit]

Martin Sacks at the Internet Movie Database

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1997 TV Week Logie Awards". Retrieved April 15, 2012. [dead link]
  2. ^ "1998 TV Week Logie Awards". Retrieved April 15, 2012. [dead link]
  3. ^ "1999 TV Week Logie Awards". Retrieved April 15, 2012. [dead link]
  4. ^ "2000 TV Week Logie Awards". Retrieved April 15, 2012. [dead link]
  5. ^ "2001 TV Week Logie Awards". Retrieved April 15, 2012. [dead link]