Martin State Airport

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Martin State Airport
Middlerivermd.jpg
IATA: MTNICAO: KMTNFAA LID: MTN
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner Maryland Aviation Administration
Serves Baltimore, Maryland
Elevation AMSL 21 ft / 6 m
Coordinates 39°19′32″N 076°24′50″W / 39.32556°N 76.41389°W / 39.32556; -76.41389
Website MartinStateAirport.com
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
15/33 6,996 2,132 Asphalt
Helipads
Number Length Surface
ft m
H1 65 20 Concrete
Statistics (2010)
Aircraft operations 69,193
Based aircraft 218
Martin State Airport Terminal

Martin State Airport (IATA: MTNICAO: KMTNFAA LID: MTN) is a joint civil-military public use airport located nine nautical miles (10 mi, 17 km) east of the central business district of Baltimore, in Baltimore County, Maryland, United States.[1] The facility is located near the town of Middle River, Maryland on Maryland State Highway 150 (Eastern Boulevard), near the intersection of Maryland State Highway 700 (Martin Boulevard). The Maryland Aviation Administration operates the Airport on behalf of the Maryland Department of Transportation. MTN is a general aviation relief airport.

This was the former plant airport for the Glenn L. Martin Company which produced a large number of military aircraft at this location between the 1920s and 1960s. The Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum and old seaplane ramps are located at the southeast corner of the airport.

The Maryland Air National Guard's 175th Wing is a tenant activity at MTN with locally based A-10C aircraft. The Air National Guard facility is located on the northwest side of the field and is officially named Warfield Air National Guard Base.

In 1937, Glen Martin proposed height restrictions around the airport because a new generation of large, heavy transports would be flying from its seaplane base.[2] By 1945, Martin had built $5.5 million in structures on the field. The company attempted to sell the property to the City of Baltimore for $1 million, but the commissioner Robert O'Boneell said there was insufficient room for expansion.[3] In 1974, Governor Marvin Mandel proposed to purchase the airport from Martin Marietta. The company formed a real-estate arm, Chesapeake Park Inc., with the former Baltimore County Council Chair Herry J. Bartenfelder to build residential and commercial real estate. Citizens of Essex opposed the use conversion, lending support to the State's purchase of the field for $9.4 million.[4] In 1980, Port-A-Port T-Hangars were purchased for general aviation use and lease.[5] In the 1990s the airport was targeted as part of the Middle River Employment Center district to have MD route 43 highway extended from I-95 direct to the terminal through a series of wetland parcels.[6]

Facilities and aircraft[edit]

Martin State Airport covers an area of 747 acres (302 ha) at an elevation of 21 feet (6 m) above mean sea level. It has one asphalt paved runway designated 15/33 which is 6,996 by 180 feet (2,132 x 55 m). It also had one helipad with a 65 by 65 ft (20 x 20 m) concrete surface.[1]

For the 12-month period ending October 6, 2010, the airport had 69,193 aircraft operations, an average of 189 per day: 91% general aviation, 6% military, and 3% air taxi. At that time there were 218 aircraft based at this airport: 64% single-engine, 14% multi-engine, 6% jet, 5% helicopter and 11% military.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Master Record for MTN (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective 30 June 2011.
  2. ^ "AIRPORT ZONE LAW URGED BY MARTIN: Plane Builder Calls On Legislature To Pass Bill Now Before It Says Measure Is Vital If City And State Are To Keep Pace With Aviation". The Baltimore Sun. 5 April 1937. 
  3. ^ "Martin Withdraws Offer to Let City Buy Airport". The Baltimore Sun. 30 May 1945. 
  4. ^ "Martin's, state set on airport sale". Baltimore Sun. 28 January 1975. 
  5. ^ "State orders 18 prefabricated hangars in move to lift Martin airport capacity". The Baltimore Sun. 26 December 1980. 
  6. ^ Highways : Construction, Management, and Maintenance. p. 142. 

External links[edit]