Martino, Phthiotis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Martino (Greek: Μαρτίνο) is a settlement in the regional unit of Phthiotis in Central Greece, and belongs to the municipality of Lokroi. Martino is located 120 km north from Athens, at an altitude of 210m. Neighbouring settlements are Malesina and Larymna.

History[edit]

3rd century BC[edit]

In the area of Martino, the 3rd century BC, developed a city with the name "Voumelitea". The city flourished until the Byzantine period.[1][2][3]

The establishment of Martino in 1383 AD[edit]

Martino founded around 1383 AD, as a settlement to its present location, and owes its name to Martin Mouzaki, leader of a (arvanitika and Greek-speaking) faction from the North Ipiros.[4][5][6]

Ottoman rule[edit]

In 1466 13 households were in the Martino. In 1506 they increased to 46 and in 1521 they reached 77. In 1688 the households of Martino increased to 100, whereas before the Greek Revolution, in 1810, reached 300, all belong to Christian families.[7]

The traveler Argyris Philippides, visited Locrida in 1815, wrote about Martino: Martino has three hundred Christian houses. Here the common language is Arvanitika. They speak of course and our language (Greek). [8]

From the Greek revolution of 1821 until the Liberation[edit]

During the Greek Revolution of 1821, seven combatants from Martino referd: Dimos Angelis, Dimos Vergos, John Kollias, Dimos Kouros, Loukas Martinoaios, Giannakis Mitzou and Panos Theodoris.

One of the major battles during the Greek revolution in the region of Locrida was that of Martino, held on January 29, 1829. Vasos Mavrovouniotis with 6th body of 1000 men decimated the Turkish army.[8][9][10][11][12]

The most important result of the victorious battle of the Greeks was that they prevented the Turkish plans for reclaiming the mainland Greece, as well as the program was able to Kapodistrias to negotiate under different and more favorable terms the borders of the newly established, independent Greek state.

Martino from the establishment of the modern Greek state until today[edit]

In 1844 Martino became the seat of the municipality Larymna with a total population of 2050 inhabitants.

The seat moved to Proskina in 1857, to return to Martino in 1872. The municipality except Martino, enclosed the villages: Proskina, Pavlo, Loutsi, Radou (Radi), Mazi, Malesina, the monasteries of St. George and Holy Trinity, Kalyvia, Mili Larmas and Mili Zeikou.

In 1882 starts the "Greek School" or "Greek Scholarcheion" in Martino.

In the 1894 the earthquake that shooked Locrida, caused Martino significant damage. In a total of 1434, 39 people were killed and 23 others injured , while 300 houses collapsed.[13]

In 1907 the municipality of Larymna numbered 5309 inhabitants, of which 1586 were residents of Martino, with mayor Yiangou Sp.

Martino recognized as an independent community in 1912, having separated from the former municipality of Larymna. The new community included Martino and the mine of Tsouka. In 1920 the community's population reached 1605 inhabitants.

In 1929 the football club "Opountios Martinou" was established.

In 1952 Martino had 2068 inhabitants.

Another key feature here is the presence of several cultural groups. In 1976 founded the Cultural Association of Martino, "MO.SY.M" which seeks to support every kind of act of cultural interest.

Since 1997, Martino was part of the new municipality of Larymna. With the new administrative reform of the Greek state (Kallikrates plan), Martino joined the enlarged municipality of Locroi.

Attractions - Tourism - Cultural events[edit]

The old part of the village declared a protected monument.

There is also the Byzantine church of Agios Georgios with Byzantine frescoes and icons.

Other attractions of the village are the entrance of the temple of Pan and the ancient fountains "Tsorokos" and "Monachou".

Each November the 8th, the village celebrates the archangels Michael and Gabriel with various events in the central church.

Sources[edit]

  1. Avraam Dimitrios P. 2001. "Locrida - Perivoagria-Epiknymidia." Lamia 2001. (In Greek)
  2. Dakoronia F., Kotoulas D., et al. - "Locris - History & Culture." Publisher: Hatzimichali Estate. (In Greek)
  3. Journal, " Ajax the Locrian 'seventh year, October 27-November–December 2011. - Batsos Nikos A. "The Battle of Martino - January 29, 1829 and Martinoaion participation in the struggle for Freedom." page 3, 8. (In Greek)
  4. Karastathis Kostas B. 1999. "Malesina - History - Monuments - Archaeological Sites." Athens. Publication of the Group for the rescue of the Byzantine church of Agios Georgios in Malesina. (In Greek)
  5. "Lokrika Chronicles". 1997. Athens: Annual Publication of Historical and Folklore Society Research of Atalanti (E.I.L.E.A.). Vol. 3. (In Greek)
  6. "Lokrika Chronicles". 1998. Athens: Annual Publication of Historical and Folklore Society Research Atalanti (E.I.L.E.A.). Vol. 4.(In Greek)
  7. Papanagiotou. D. Triantafyllou. - "1821 in Lokrida - The Battle of Martino and its importance." Publ. Fthiotika Grammata. Athens 1979. (In Greek)
  8. Magazine "Apoplous" Issue 6. 2002. Version: Musical and Cultural Association "Atalanti Choir." page 6. (In Greek)
  9. Protopapas Zissis. 1952. "Locrida". Athens 1952. (In Greek)
  10. Christophorou K. Manthos 1991. - "The Opountion Locrida and Atalanti - Memories and testimonies." 1st Part. Athens: Society for Historical and Folklore Research Atalanti (E.I.L.E.A.). (In Greek)
  11. Christophorou K. Manthos 1993. "The Opountion Locrida and Atalanti - Memories and testimonies." Part second. Athens: Society for Historical and Folklore Research Atalanti (E.I.L.E.A.). (In Greek)
  12. Christophorou K. Manthos 1995. "The Opountion Locrida and Atalanti - Memories and testimonies." Part 3. Athens: Society for Historical and Folklore Research Atalanti (E.I.L.E.A.). (In Greek)
  13. Christophorou K. Manthos 2001. "Timeline Opountios Atalanti and 4000 years – in brief" Ed: Municipality of Atalanti. (In Greek)

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ According to Christophorou M. "Voumelitea was" near Martino or Proskina. " - Christophorou K. Manthos 1991. "The Opountion Locrida and Atalanti - Memories and testimonies." 1st Part. Athens: Society for Historical and Folklore Research of Atalanti(E.I.L.E.A.). p.59 (in Greek)
  2. ^ Dakoronia F. notes: "... probably close to Martino or Proskina." - Dakoronia F. Kotoulas D., et al. - "Locris - History & Culture." Publisher: Hatzimichali Estate. p.115(in Greek)
  3. ^ Karastathis K. refers to Oldfather’s study, which locates Voumelitea in the area Paleochora of Martino, and also the study of Klaffenbach, which considers most likely place the old village of Malesina. He supports the view of Klaffenbach and also mentions that some other scholars (Etienne R., Knoepfrer) who put the city in the a location called Hiliadou. - Karastathis Kostas B. 1999. "Malesina - History - Monuments - Archaeological Sites." Athens. Publication of the Group for the rescue of the Byzantine church of Agios Georgios Malesina.(in Greek)
  4. ^ Christophorou K. Manthos 2001. "Timeline Opountos Atalanti and 4000 years - in brief." Version Atalanti City. p.14 (in Greek)
  5. ^ Karastathis Kostas B. 1999. "Malesina - History - Monuments - Archaeological Sites." Athens. Publication of the Group for the rescue of the Byzantine church of Agios Georgios Malesina. pp. 88-92.(in Greek)
  6. ^ Dakoronia F. Kotoulas D., et al. - "Locris - History & Culture." Publisher: Hatzimichali Estate. p.147(in Greek)
  7. ^ Karastathis Kostas B. 1999. "Malesina - History - Monuments - Archaeological Sites." Athens. Publication of the Group for the rescue of the Byzantine church of Agios Georgios Malesina. p. 93
  8. ^ a b “Lokron Chronicles". 1997. Athens: Annual Publication of Historical and Folklore Society Studies of Atalanti (E.I.L.E.A.). Vol.3rd. p.115. In Greek.
  9. ^ Christophorou K. Manthos 1991. "The Opountion Locrida and Atalanti - Memories and testimonies." 1st Part. Athens: Society for Historical and Folklore Research Atalanti (E.I.L.E.A.). p. 271.(in Greek)
  10. ^ “Lokron Chronicles". 1998. Athens: Annual Publication of Historical and Folklore Society Studies of Atalanti (E.I.L.E.A.). Vol. 4. p. 35.(in Greek)
  11. ^ Karastathis says: "The enemy numbered 6000 infantry, 1000 cavalry and heavy artillery ... Vasos Mavrovouniotis placed the squad of Triantafillos Tzouras at his home which was at the entrance of the village ... and the squad of Ioannis Klimakas in the village center. Turks camped away from Martino ... the next day started ... with all the army. Mahmud himself was head of the cavalry ... the Turks entered the village and proceeded to the other side of the general confusion...Greeks persecute and exterminate the Turks ... They killed more than 500 Turks, while they fell into their hands many guns, trucks, animals, money, and three Turkish flags. " - Karastathis Kostas B. 1999. "Malesina - History - Monuments - Archaeological Sites." Athens. Publication of the Group for the rescue of the Byzantine church of Agios Georgios Malesina. p. 131.(in Greek)
  12. ^ Mpatsos N agrees with the numbers apposed by Christophorou and Papanagiotou for the Turkish army. It also adds that the Greek defenders of Martino by 100 Theban soldiers, led by centurion G. Skourtaniotis, who, despite the orders had been given by chiliarch Evmorfopoulou left Gaidouronisi and rushed to help at Martino. - Newspaper, "Ajax the Locrian'’, 7th year,. October 27-November–December 2011. - Mpatsos Nick A. "The Battle of Martino - January 29, 1829 and Martinoaion participation in the struggle for Freedom." p. 3, 8.(in Greek)
  13. ^ Karastathis Kostas B. 1999. "Malesina - History - Monuments - Archaeological Sites." Athens. Publication: Group for the rescue of the Byzantine church of Agios Georgios Malesina. p. 145. In Greek

Coordinates: 38°34′N 23°13′E / 38.567°N 23.217°E / 38.567; 23.217