Mary G. Dietz

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Era Contemporary philosophy
Region American
Main interests
Political philosophy, Feminist theory, History of philosophy

Mary Golden Dietz is the John Evans Professor of Political Theory at Northwestern University.[1] She holds a joint appointment in Northwestern's Department of Political Science and its Gender and Sexuality Studies Program. She is the author of many books and articles in feminist theory and the history of philosophy and edited the journal, Political Theory: An International Journal of Political Philosophy, from 2005-2012. Prior to joining the faculty at Northwestern, she taught at the University of Minnesota.[2]

Dietz graduated Magna Cum Laude from Mount Holyoke College in 1972 with a degree in political science.[3] Dietz did her master's and doctoral work at the University of California, Berkeley. While there she developed an interest in the work of Hannah Arendt through graduate seminars with the political theorist Hanna Pitkin.[2]

She is the author of Between the Human and the Divine: The Political Thought of Simone Weil (1988)[4] and Turning Operations: Feminism, Arendt, Politics (2002).[5][6] She is also the editor of Thomas Hobbes & Political Theory (1990).[7]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.polisci.northwestern.edu/people/dietz.html. Retrieved February 21, 2014.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. ^ a b "An Interview with Mary G. Dietz". Retrieved February 21, 2014. 
  3. ^ Dietz, Mary. "Curriculum Vitae". Retrieved February 21, 2014. 
  4. ^ Dietz, Mary G. (1988). Between the human and the divine : the political thought of Simone Weil. Totowa (N.J.): Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 0847675750. 
  5. ^ Dietz, Mary G. (2002). Turning operations : feminism, Arendt and politics. New York: Routledge. ISBN 0415932459. 
  6. ^ Lee, Theresa Man Ling (Fall 2004). "Review of Turning Operations: Feminism, Arendt, Politics". The Review of Politics 66 (4): 699–701. doi:10.1017/s0034670500040031. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  7. ^ Dietz, edited by Mary G. (1990). Thomas Hobbes and political theory. Lawrence, Kan.: University Press of Kansas. ISBN 0700604200.