Mary Kaldor

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Mary Kaldor
CBE
Mary Kaldor crop.jpg
Mary Kaldor in 2000.
Born (1946-03-16) March 16, 1946 (age 68)
Nationality United Kingdom
Institution London School of Economics
Field Global governance
Alma mater Somerville College, Oxford

Mary Henrietta Kaldor CBE[1] (born 16 March 1946) is a British academic, currently Professor of Global Governance at the London School of Economics, where she is also the Director of the Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit.[2] She has been a key figure in the development of cosmopolitan democracy. She writes on globalisation, international relations and humanitarian intervention, global civil society and global governance, as well as what she calls New Wars.

Before the LSE, Kaldor worked at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) and now serves on its governing board.[3] She also worked at the Science Policy Research Unit at the University of Sussex,[4] where she worked closely with English economist Christopher Freeman. She was a founding member of European Nuclear Disarmament, editing its European Nuclear Disarmament Journal (1983–88). She was the founder and Co-Chair of the Helsinki Citizens Assembly,[4] and a founding member of the European Council on Foreign Relations.[5] She also writes for OpenDemocracy.net,[6] belongs to the Board of Trustees of the Hertie School of Governance, and is on the Editorial Board of Stability: International Journal of Security and Development.

She is the daughter of the economist Nicholas Kaldor[7] and Clarissa Goldschmidt, a history graduate from Somerville College, Oxford. She is also the sister of Frances Stewart, Professor at the Oxford Department of International Development (ODID), University of Oxford. The family moved to west Cambridge in 1950.[8] Kaldor began her career with a B.A. in philosopy, politics and economics (PPE) from Oxford University.[6]

In a 2008 interview Kaldor said "The international community makes a terrible mess wherever it goes":

It is hard to find a single example of humanitarian intervention during the 1990s that can be unequivocally declared a success. Especially after Kosovo, the debate about whether human rights can be enforced through military means is ever more intense. Moreover, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, which have been justified in humanitarian terms, have further called into question the case for intervention.[7][relevant? ]

Selected bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ London Gazette, New Year's Honours Diplomatic and Overseas List 2001
  2. ^ Mary Kaldor's LSE page.
  3. ^ http://www.sipri.org/about/organization/board
  4. ^ a b LSE page
  5. ^ European Council on Foreign Relations "Council".
  6. ^ a b opendemocracy.net Mary Kaldor
  7. ^ a b The Guardian, 1 April 2008, INterview: 'The international community makes a terrible mess wherever it goes'
  8. ^ Toye, John (2011), "Social wellbeing and conflict: themes from the work of Frances Stewart", in FitzGerald, Valpy; Heyer, Judith; Thorp, Rosemary, Overcoming the persistence of inequality and poverty, Houndsmill, Basingstoke, Hampshire New York: Palgrave, ISBN 9780230249707