Mary Lee (actress)

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Mary Lee
Born Mary Lee Wooters
(1924-10-24)October 24, 1924
Centralia, Illinois, U.S.
Died June 6, 1996(1996-06-06) (aged 71)
Sacramento, California, U.S.
Occupation Singer, film actress
Spouse(s) Harry J. Banan (1943-1990)

Mary Lee (1924-1996) was a singer and actress from the early 1930s through the mid 1940s. The daughter of a musical family, at age six she began singing with her father and older sister who were already performing country songs over a local radio station and at various events in the LaSalle County, Illinois area. In 1938, she joined the Chicago based Ted Weems Orchestra, singing, touring, and recording with the band into mid 1940. First coming to the attention of Warner Brothers Pictures in 1938, and then Republic Pictures in 1939, Mary Lee would appear in 19 feature films, 11 of which were B Westerns, from early 1939 through late 1944. And, during 1942, she appeared and recorded with Bob Crosby and his Bob Cats. Mary Lee did not make any screen appearances after 1944, but maintained a youthful look well into her thirties.

Early Life[edit]

Born Mary Lee Wooters in Centralia, Illinois on October 24, 1924, her mother and father were Lela Myrtle Telford (1898) and Louis Ellis Wooters (1897). They had three daughters, Vera Mae (1920), Mary Lee (1924), and Norma Jean (1929).[1] A fourth daughter, Dorris Lucille, died shortly after birth in 1923.[2] When Mary Lee was four years old the family moved to Ottawa, Illinois where Louis Wooters opened a barbershop. Soon, Wooters and his oldest daughter, Vera who was eleven, were singing over a low power 100 Watt radio station in nearby LaSalle, Illinois. Jealous and feeling a little left out, Mary Lee joined them when she was six years old. Mr. Wooters and Vera sat at a table with a microphone setting on it. Mary Lee, who had to stand in order to reach the microphone, remembered "I probably couldn't sing very good, but I could sing loud."[3] In addition to being on the radio, the Wooters trio performed at various local events singing country songs. Interestingly, Gene Autry and Smiley Burnette, who were appearing on the WLS National Barn Dance in Chicago on Saturday nights, would tour and perform at small towns in the area during the week. The Wooters lived near Chicago and were WLS National Barn Dance fans. When Gene Autry and Smiley Burnette appeared in Ottawa in 1935, Mr. Wooters took the family backstage to meet them.[4] Mary Lee said "Mr. Autry shook hands with me and gave me one of his song books."[3] Eventually, they would meet again.

In May of 1938, Ted Weems was appearing with his band at Starved Rock State Park in LaSalle County, Illinois. The ballroom manager asked Mr. Wooters if thirteen year old Mary Lee could audition for Ted Weems. Louis Wooters agreed, Mary Lee sang "Sissy", "Please Be Kind", and "Dinah". Joining the Ted Weems band on June 15, 1938, she is heard with Ted Weems and His Orchestra on Decca 3044-B / "There'll Be Some Changes Made"[5] recorded on October 4, 1939. With Vera accompaning as her companion and teacher,[6] Mary Lee toured with the Ted Weems Orchestra until mid 1940.

Hollywood[edit]

In the summer of 1938, the Ted Weems band was playing at the Avalon Ballroom on Santa Catalina Island south-southwest of Los Angeles.[7] It was on August 23, 1938, while on the California tour, that Mary Lee made her first recording with the Weems band. At Catalina Island talent scouts for Warner Brothers spotted her.[3] Mary Lee's first screen appearance was with Warner Brothers Pictures in Nancy Drew... Reporter (released 18 February 1939) where she portrayed Mary Nickerson, the younger sister of Nancy Drew's (Bonita Granville) boyfriend Ted Nickerson (Frank Thomas Jr.). The film utilized Lee's vocal talents in the song "Nursery Rhyme Melody".

Later in 1939, after hearing Mary Lee sing one of his songs at a Ted Weems remote broadcast in California, Gene Autry invited her to visit him on the set at Republic Pictures. After the visit, Mary Lee, not giving much significance to it, continued on east with the Weems band.[3] Appearing at the 1939 New York World's Fair Wild West Show and Rodeo on July 22, 1939, Gene Autry and wife Ina, accompanied by President of Republic Pictures Herbert Yates and wife Petra, their son Richard Yates, public relations man William Saal, Lindy Champion[8] and a palomino, and a new horse trailer, then left the Port of New York on July 26th aboard the S.S. Washington arriving at Plymouth, England on August 1st [9] for an extended tour of the British Isles.[10] [4] [11] Theaters were filled to capacity in London, Belfast, Glasgow, Liverpool, wherever Autry went. In the streets thousands, tens of thousands of fans came to see him, and in Dublin an estimated 300,000 people turned out to greet Gene Autry as he paraded through the town on Champion.[10] [11] [12] However, after a few weeks, sensing what was about to become Hitler's Invasion of Poland, passage was booked for the return trip home and the tour was cut short. On August 31st they boarded the S.S. Manhattan at Southampton arriving back at the Port of New York on September 7, 1939.[13] [14] Yates covered the bill for the entire trip. From that tour, Autry brought back the song "South of the Border", written for him by two Englishmen, Jimmy Kennedy and Michael Carr. Republic quickly bought the screen rights to the song for one thousand dollars.[10] Following his return from the tour, Gene Autry arranged with Ted Weems an audition for Mary Lee at Republic Pictures.[3] [4] Accepting a job at Republic, a script was written, production began in late October,[6] and Mary Lee, at age fifteen, first appeared with Gene Autry and June Storey in South of the Border (15 December 1939) where she sang "Merry-Go-Roundup" as a solo, "Goodbye Little Darlin' Goodbye" in a duet with Gene Autry, and joined Gene Autry, Smiley Burnette, June Storey, and the Checkerboard Band in singing "South of the Border" in the closing scene.

June Storey and Mary Lee in the motion picture Gaucho Serenade (10 May 1940). Click on the image to enlarge. The movie features an elaborate musical scene at the Gaucho Cantina where Duncan Renaldo as "Gaucho Don José" is in charge of the festivities. And, Mary Lee sings "Give Out With a Song", "A Song At Sunset" [15] in a duet with Gene Autry on the shore of Lake Hemet in the San Jacinto Mountains, and "Keep Rollin' Lazy Longhorns" with Gene Autry, Smiley Burnette, and chorus.

Mary Lee added a delightfully refreshing new dimension to Gene Autry's musical Westerns, usually having one to three solo numbers plus a duet with Autry or Smiley Burnette. During 1940 Mary Lee would appear in five Autry films plus Sing, Dance, Plenty Hot (10 August 1940), Barnyard Follies (6 October 1940), and Melody and Moonlight (11 October 1940). Without having any formal dramatic training, Mary Lee had a natural talent for acting and Republic signed her to a term contract in June of 1940.[6] Mary Lee was featured in nine of Autry's films at Republic, five of those along with leading lady June Storey in which she played the part of the teenaged sister, "Patsy". Mary Lee's last appearance with June Storey was in Barnyard Follies after which June Storey diversified away from Westerns.

One of Mary Lee's most significant roles in an Autry movie was in Ridin' on a Rainbow (24 January 1941). There she received top billing in the cast just under Gene Autry and Smiley Burnette. Mary Lee's character, "Patsy Evans", is the central character in the story much of which takes place on a riverboat, the "Jolly Betsy". Mary Lee sings "Sing a Song of Laughter", "What's Your Favorite Holiday", "Carry Me Back to the Lone Prairie" with Gene Autry, and "I'm the Only Lonely One".

Except for the film Melody Ranch (15 November 1940) in which her character's name was "Penny", Mary Lee was always "Patsy" in the Autry films.[16] Mary Lee's last appearance in a Gene Autry feature film was in The Singing Hill (26 April 1941) with Virginia Dale where she sang "Patsy's Birthday Song", "Ridin' Down That Old Texas Trail" with Gene Autry, Smiley Burnette, and Cactus Mac, "Sail the Seven Seas" with Smiley Burnette, and "Let a Smile Be Your Umbrella" with the cast. Her next film was Angels with Broken Wings (27 May 1941). During this period in 1941 she also appeared in three Republic Meet the Stars shorts, #5 (24 April 1941), #7 (24 June 1941), and #8 (24 July 1941), all narrated by Harriet Parsons,[17] daughter of Louella Parsons.

In addition to her work at Republic Pictures, Mary Lee appeared on Gene Autry's Melody Ranch CBS radio program as a cast member and featured vocalist from September of 1940 through March of 1941. She narrated a re-creation of the Republic motion picture Melody Ranch on a special Melody Ranch program, with guests Ann Miller, Jimmy Durante, and Gabby Hayes, which aired over CBS on December 29, 1940 to promote the movie.[18] The radio program normally originated from one of the CBS Columbia Square KNX Playhouse studios in Hollywood. However, beginning on October 9th through the 27th, Autry was appearing daily at the annual Madison Square Garden World Championship Rodeo in New York City.[4] From there he went to the Boston Rodeo and finally on to Chicago before returning to Hollywood. During that tour the Melody Ranch program originated from CBS studios in New York City (WABC), Boston (WEEI), and Chicago (WBBM). Mary Lee was not on the tour but returned to the Melody Ranch program on November 24, 1940.

Many of Mary Lee's songs from the Gene Autry movies can be found issued on Varèse Sarabande VSD-5910 / Gene Autry with His Little Darlin' Mary Lee. Included with this CD is a booklet with photos and a biography of Mary Lee.

World War II Years[edit]

Gene Autry enlisted in the United States Army in July of 1942 to serve during World War II interrupting his film career at Republic. He was inducted into the United States Army Air Corps on the July 26th broadcast of the Melody Ranch program which originated from the CBS WBBM Playhouse, Studio 10, in Chicago.[19] Bells of Capistrano (15 September 1942) was his last film until 1946.[20]

Mary Lee did not make any film appearances in 1942. On June 26th and July 30th of 1942, she recorded eight country tracks with Bob Crosby and his Bob Cats. All of those tracks have been reissued on CD. See the discography for song titles and issues.

Meanwhile, Mary Lee's younger sister, Norma Jean Wooters, appeared in two Charles Starrett films at Columbia Pictures.[21] First she was "Buckshot Bishop" in Bad Men of the Hills (13 August 1942). Then, at age thirteen as "Buckshot McBride" in The Fighting Buckaroo (1 February 1943), she helps out Ernest Tubb with his composition "Ridin' that Dusty Trail".[22] as Kay Harris[23] rides along with them.

Building on the popularity of her role as "Patsy" in the Autry films and her 4' 11" height, Republic next billed Mary Lee as "America's Little Sister" and starred her in Shantytown (20 April 1943), Nobody's Darling (27 August 1943), and Three Little Sisters (31 July 1944).[16]

In 1944, Mary Lee co-starred in two of Roy Rogers' feature films, first singing "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"[24] in Cowboy and the Senorita (13 May 1944), a musical extravaganza in which Dale Evans made her first appearance in a Roy Rogers film. In the finale Mary Lee, Dale Evans, Roy Rogers, and the Sons of the Pioneers perform "Enchilada Man" and "Cowboy and the Senorita".[25] Three months later, in her last screen appearance, Mary Lee again joined Roy Rogers and Dale Evans in Song of Nevada (5 August 1944) where, backed by the Sons of the Pioneers, she sings "The Wigwam Song",[26] written by Glenn Spencer, and reprises it in the Song of Nevada finale.[27] [16] Compare Mary Lee's height there at age 19 to that of Dale Evans who was 5' 4" tall.

With her five year contract at Republic Pictures running out in February of 1945, Mary Lee then retired from the silver screen.[6]

Personal Life[edit]

The Wooters family moved from Ottawa, Illinois to Los Angeles in late 1939 or early 1940. In April of 1940 their home was in the Hollywood district at 1250 N. Cahuenga Blvd.[28] [29] Mary Lee attended the Mar-Ken Private School for professional children in Hollywood. As a Junior she was elected Secretary of the Student Body Council in November of 1940. She graduated in 1942. At Mar-Ken it was said that Mary Lee enjoyed horseback riding and dancing.[30] And, the Republic Pictures publicity department reported that she could speak French, Spanish and could often be found at the Autry's home practicing diving in their pool when she wasn't swimming at Malibu Beach.[31]

Older sister, Vera Wooters, who had been working as a secretary for Gene Autry at his Western Music Publishing Company since arriving in California, enlisted in the Women's Army Corps as an Aviation Cadet on March 19, 1943 at Los Angeles.[32] Vera Mae Wooters married Edward Elman Betts in Kanawha County, West Virginia on October 27, 1947.

In November of 1943, Mary Lee Wooters married Harry J. Banan, Sergeant, United States Army, returning from World War II.[33] They had two children, Harry Philip and Laura L.[34] Later in life, Mary Lee was an account teller at Bank of America.[6]

After Vera and Mary Lee left home, Louis Wooters went to work for Gene Autry as his groundskeeper.[4]

Mary Lee's younger sister, Norma Jean Wooters, married Richard Pierson Tibbs in 1948. Known as Bucky Tibbs, sometimes spelled "Buckie Tibbs", she worked with Tennessee Ernie Ford on Cliffie Stone's Hometown Jamboree radio and television show and is seen in an early 1950s group photo.[35] Bucky Tibbs is heard with Tennessee Ernie on the 1952 recording Capitol 2017 / "Hambone".[36] Divorced from Tibbs, Norma Jean married Thomas Elman Mitchell in 1953.

Dorris Lucille Wooters who died as an infant in 1923 is interred at Little Grove Cemetery in Jefferson County, Illinois.[2] Mary Lee's older sister, Vera Mae (Wooters) Betts, passed away in 1964 at Temple University Hospital and is interred at Cunningham Memorial Park Cemetery, St. Albans, Kanawha County, West Virginia.[37] [38] Her father, Louis Ellis Wooters, died in 1966.[39] Mary Lee remained married to Harry J. Banan until his death in 1990.[40] Mary Lee Banan died in Sacramento, California on June 6, 1996, at age 71.[41] Mary Lee (Wooters) and Harry J. Banan, Master Sergeant, United States Army, are interred at Sacramento's East Lawn Sierra Hills Cemetery.[42] [43] [44] Her mother, Lela Myrtle (Telford) Wooters, died later in December of 1996.[45] Lela M. and Louie E. Wooters, Private, United States Army, are interred at Los Angeles National Cemetery.[46] [47] [48] Norma Jean (Wooters) Mitchell, died in Orange County, California on June 2, 2002.[49]

Discography[edit]

Matrix number, title, artist, and issue number shown as they appear on the 78rpm record label.

 Commercial Recordings by Mary Lee[50][51][52]
Session Date Matrix Number Title - Artist Label Issue Number
08/23/1938
DLA 1440
JULIANA - Ted Weems and His Orchestra with Vocal Chorus by Elmo Tanner and Mary Lee (2:28) Decca
2020 A
10/04/1939
66719
JIMINY CRICKET - Ted Weems and His Orchestra with Vocal Chorus by Elmo Tanner and Mary Lee (2:37) Decca
2793 A
10/04/1939
66723
THERE'LL BE SOME CHANGES MADE - Ted Weems and His Orchestra with Vocal Chorus by Mary Lee (2:59) Decca
3044 B
10/04/1939
66724
THE MERRY-GO-ROUNDUP - Ted Weems and His Orchestra with Vocal Chorus by Mary Lee (2:33) Decca
3135 B
10/05/1939
66728
BACK TO SMOKEY MOUNTAIN - Ted Weems and His Orchestra with Vocal Chorus by Mary Lee and Elmo Tanner (2:29) Decca
2829 B
06/26/1942
L 3059
I HUNG MY HEAD AND CRIED - Mary Lee with Bob Crosby's Bob Cats (2:35) Decca
4346 A
06/26/1942
L 3060
YOU'RE MY DARLING - Mary Lee with Bob Crosby's Bob Cats (2:25) Decca
4346 B
06/26/1942
L 3061
THE END OF THE WORLD - Mary Lee with Bob Crosby's Bob Cats (2:31) Decca
4380 B
06/26/1942
L 3062
YOU BROKE MY HEART, LITTLE DARLIN' - Mary Lee with Bob Crosby's Bob Cats (2:30) Decca
4422 A
07/30/1942
L 3160
I DON'T CARE ANYMORE - Mary Lee with Bob Crosby's Bob Cats (2:13) Decca
4380 A
07/30/1942
L 3161
IT MAKES NO NEVER MIND - Mary Lee with Bob Crosby's Bob Cats (2:30) Decca
4402 A
07/30/1942
L 3162
I TOLD YOU SO - Mary Lee with Bob Crosby's Bob Cats (2:27) Decca
4422 B
07/30/1942
L 3163
I'LL NEVER CRY OVER YOU - Mary Lee with Bob Crosby's Bob Cats (2:49) Decca
4402 B

Mary Lee's recordings with the Bob Crosby Bob Cats have been reissued in Australia on CD as Swaggie Records 504 / Bob Crosby's Bob Cats - Volume Four 1941-1942, in the United Kingdom on CD as Halcyon Records DHDL140 / Bob Crosby and His Orchestra - Volume 18 Where Do We Go From Here, and in the United States on CD as Sounds of Yesteryear 753 / The Complete Bob Cats, Volume Three of Three: It's All Over Now.

Commercial Recordings by Bucky Tibbs
Session Date Matrix Number Title - Artist Label Issue Number
09/26/1950
6632
THIS SUSPENSE IS KILLIN' ME - Bucky Tibbs and Deuce Spriggens Capitol
1477
09/26/1950
6635-Y
DON'T KINDLE THE FLAME - Bucky Tibbs and Deuce Spriggens (2:12) Capitol
1477
09/26/1950
6633
I BRUNG YOU A PRESENT - Bucky Tibbs and Deuce Spriggens Capitol
1288
09/26/1950
6634-Z
BUTTER FINGERS - Bucky Tibbs and Deuce Spriggens (2:25) Capitol
1288
1951
6918
TATER PIE - Bucky Tibbs and Jimmy Dale Capitol
1354
1951
7117-Y
SHENANDOAH WALTZ - Bucky Tibbs and Jimmy Dale with Cliffie Stone's Hometown Jamboree Gang (2:23) Capitol
1425
1951
7118-Z
JUST LIKE TWO DROPS OF WATER - Bucky Tibbs with Cliffie Stone's Hometown Jamboree Gang Capitol
1425
1952
9776
HAMBONE - Tennessee Ernie with Bucky Tibbs and Cliffie Stone's Orchestra (1:52) Capitol
2017

Filmography[edit]


 Motion Pictures in which Mary Lee Appeared[16][17]
  • Rancho Grande (22 March 1940), Republic Pictures, 35 mm b&w, 68 min
  • Carolina Moon (15 July 1940), Republic Pictures, 35 mm b&w, 65 min
  • Melody Ranch (15 November 1940), Republic Pictures, 35 mm b&w, 84 min
  • Shantytown (20 April 1943), Republic Pictures, 35 mm b&w, 66 min
  • Song of Nevada (5 August 1944), Republic Pictures, 35 mm b&w, 75 min

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ FamilySearch, United States Census, 1930, Louis F. Wooters, <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XSBF-WQZ> (Click on the link to view.)
  2. ^ a b FamilySearch, Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, Dorris Lucille Wooters, <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N3BQ-WJB> (Click on the link to view.)
  3. ^ a b c d e Birchard, Robert S., Gene Autry with His Little Darlin' Mary Lee, Varèse Sarabande Records VSD-5910, 1998, pp. 3-4
  4. ^ a b c d e George-Warren, Holly, Public Cowboy No. 1 : The Life and Times of Gene Autry, Oxford University Press, 2007, pp. 182-183, 187, 190-192, 196, 225
  5. ^ Ted Weems and His Orchestra with Vocal Chorus by Mary Lee, "There'll Be Some Changes Made", Decca 3044-B, October 4, 1939, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bsWSlluPjE> (Click on the link to listen.)
  6. ^ a b c d e Anderson, Chuck, The Old Corral, <http://www.b-westerns.com/ladies32.htm> (Click on the link to view.)
  7. ^ Ahern, Mickey, "Gossiping Eyes", The Catalina Islander, September 15, 1938, <http://cat.stparchive.com/Archive/CAT/CAT09151938P01.php> and <http://cat.stparchive.com/Archive/CAT/CAT09151938P10.php>, p. 1 column 4, p.10 columns 2,3 (Clink on the links to view.)
  8. ^ Lindy Champion, <http://www.autry.com/geneautry/champion/lindychampion.html> (Click on the link to view.)
  9. ^ Ancestry UK, All UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1906, Gene Autry, <http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=BT26&rank=1&new=1&so=3&MSAV=0&gss=ms_r_db&gsfn=Gene&gsln=Autry&msbdy=1907&msady=1939&dbOnly=_F0005868%7C_F0005868_x&dbOnly=_F00061E6%7C_F00061E6_x&dbOnly=_F00061E7%7C_F00061E7_x&uidh=jaf&msbdm=9&msadm=8> (Click on the link to view.)
  10. ^ a b c Autry, Gene with Mickey Herskowitz, Back in the Saddle Again, Doubleday, 1978, pp. 69-74, 82,83
  11. ^ a b Gene Autry Personal Appearances - 1939, <http://www.geneautry.com/geneautry/personalappearances/1939.php> (Click on the link to view.)
  12. ^ Autry, Gene, Songs Gene Autry Sings, photo: "Gene's triumphant parade in Dublin' Ireland", Western Music Publishing Company, 1942, p. 23
  13. ^ Autry, Gene and Herbert Yates, S.S. Manhattan Manifest, <https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-22105-24804-33?cc=1923888>, lines 1-5 (Click on the link to view image.)
  14. ^ Saal, William, S.S. Manhattan Manifest, <https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-22105-24730-42?cc=1923888>, line 20 (Click on the link to view image.)
  15. ^ Autry, Gene and Mary Lee, "A Song at Sunset" from Gaucho Serenade, Republic Pictures, 1940, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Suky3iqKn0> (Click on the link listen.)
  16. ^ a b c d IMDb, Mary Lee, <http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0497847/?ref_=fn_al_nm_2> (Click on the link to view.)
  17. ^ a b IMDb, Harriet Parsons, <http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0663832/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1> (Click on the link to view.)
  18. ^ Gene Autry's Melody Ranch, 29 Dec 1940, Melody Ranch DVD, Image Entertainment, 2003
  19. ^ Family Search, United States World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946, Orvon G. Autry, <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K8G4-R5R> (Click on the link to view.)
  20. ^ Autry, Gene with Mickey Herskowitz, Back in the Saddle Again, Doubleday, 1978, pp. 82,83
  21. ^ IMDb, Norma Jean Wooters, <http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0941362/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1> (Click on the link to view.)
  22. ^ Tubb, Ernest and Norma Jean Wooters, "Ridin' that Dusty Trail" from The Fighting Buckaroo, Columbia Pictures, 1943, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nElIMOFEVEQ> (Click on the link to listen.)
  23. ^ IMDb, Kay Harris, <http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0364929/?ref_=ttfc_fc_cl_t2> (Click on the link to view.)
  24. ^ Lee, Mary, "She Wore A Yellow Ribbon" from Cowboy and the Senorita, Republic Pictures, 1944, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1aP_r_e_o0> (Click on the link to listen.)
  25. ^ Entire cast, finale from Cowboy and the Senorita, Republic Pictures, 1944, <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MwyNm1Wd9Rs> (Click on the link to listen.)
  26. ^ Lee, Mary "The Wigwam Song" from Song of Nevada, Republic Pictures, 1944, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysmUX3HXGQ8> (Click on the link to listen.)
  27. ^ Entire cast, finale from Song of Nevada, Republic Pictures, 1944 <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0OeJyFC4OQ> (Click on the link to listen.)
  28. ^ FamilySearch, United States Census, 1940, Louis Wooters, <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K9C6-1C8> (Click on the link to view.)
  29. ^ FamilySearch, United States Census, 1940, Louis Wooters, <https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-27797-3575-67?cc=2000219>, lines 65-69 (Click on the link to view image.)
  30. ^ Simon, Alan, Mar-Ken School, 2009, <http://www.mar-ken.org/biossz/wootersm.html> (Click on the link to view.)
  31. ^ Republic Pictures, "Good Work Nets Film Youngster Bigger Contract", Ride, Tenderfoot, Ride Pressbook, Ride, Tenderfoot, Ride DVD, Image Entertainment, 2006
  32. ^ FamilySearch, United States World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946, Vera M. Wooters, <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K8L4-7PK> (Click on the link to view.)
  33. ^ FamilySearch, California, County Marriages, 1850-1952, Mary Lee Wooters and Harry Junior Banan, <https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-29966-12715-68?cc=1804002> (Click on the link to view image.)
  34. ^ Family Search, New York, New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1909, 1925-1957, S.S. Santa Paula, 11 May 1955, Harry Banan, <https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-34005-2118-73?cc=1923888>, lines 18-21 (Click on the link to view image.)
  35. ^ Stone, Cliffie, Gallery, Early Years, <http://www.cliffiestone.com/Cliffie/archives/archive_photos.html> (Click on the link to view.)
  36. ^ Ford, Tennessee Ernie and Bucky Tibbs, "Hambone", Capitol 2017, 1952, <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZ5chUaSKl0> (Click on the link to listen.)
  37. ^ FamilySearch, West Virginia Deaths, Vera W. Betts, <https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NM2F-Q5G> (Click on the link to view.)
  38. ^ Vera W. Betts, Certificate of Death, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, <http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view2.aspx?FilmNumber=460390&ImageNumber=612>, lower half of page (Click on the link to view image.)
  39. ^ FamilySearch, California, Death Index, Louie E. Wooters, <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VGY2-9QF> (Click on the link to view.)
  40. ^ Family Search, California, Death Index, Harry Junior Banan, <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VP9W-BKR> (Click on the link to view.)
  41. ^ Family Search, California, Death Index, Mary Lee Banan, <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VP37-J5G> (Click on the link to view.)
  42. ^ FindAGrave, Mary Lee Banan, <http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=52502591> (Click on the link to view.)
  43. ^ FindAGrave, Harry J. Banan, <http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=57963145> (Click on the link to view.)
  44. ^ FindAGrave, Mary Lee and Harry J Banan, gravestone, <http://image1.findagrave.com/photos/2010/242/57963145_128329521719.jpg> (Click on the link to view.)
  45. ^ FamilySearch, California, Death Index, Lela Myrtle Wooters, <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VP3F-9SB> (Click on the link to view.)
  46. ^ FindAGrave, Lela M. Wooters, <http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=1346271> (Click on the link to view.)
  47. ^ FindAGrave, Louie E. Wooters, <http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=1346272> (Click on the link to view.)
  48. ^ FindAGrave, Lela M. and Louie E. Wooters, gravestone, <http://image2.findagrave.com/photos/2012/277/1346272_134941295287.jpg> (Click on the link to view.)
  49. ^ FamilySearch, United States Social Security Death Index, Norma J. Mitchell, <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J58P-WYC> (Click on the link to view.)
  50. ^ Abrams, Steven and Tyrone Settlemier, The Online Discographical Project, <http://www.78discography.com/> (Click on the link to view.)
  51. ^ Ruppli, Michel, The Decca Labels: A Discography (6 volume set), Greenwood Press, 1996
  52. ^ The Complete Ted Weems and His Orchestra on the Decca Label, <http://www.angelfire.com/music5/tony2003/html/weems.html>, scroll down the page (Click on the link to view.)

References[edit]

External Links[edit]