Maryland Board of Public Works

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The Board of Public Works is a three-member body consisting of the Governor, Comptroller, and Treasurer of the state of Maryland in the United States. It oversees many aspects of the state's finances.

History and purpose[edit]

The board was established by the Maryland Constitution of 1864, replacing the Commissioners of Public Works and various other boards.[1] The board acts as a check on the power of the General Assembly[2] and also guarantees "that significant State expenditures are necessary and appropriate, fiscally responsible, fair, and lawful" and that "executive decisions are made responsibly and responsively".[1]

Duties[edit]

A unique institution amongst both the federal and U.S. state governments, the board is also quite powerful, possessing the final say in spending through loans approved by the Maryland General Assembly and in capital improvements (except roads and bridges). In addition, the board has the authority to borrow money and provide supplemental funding for state agencies. All state land purchases are carried out by the board and all contracts for office space and leases are approved by the board. While the state legislature is not in session, the board takes up many of its fiscal responsibilities in ensuring the operation of the state government.[2]

Current members[edit]

Office Incumbent Image in Office since Political party
Governor of Maryland Martin O'Malley Martin O'Malley, photo portrait, visiting Maryland National Guard, June 8, 2008.jpg January 17, 2007 Democratic
Comptroller of Maryland Peter Franchot 1franchot9.jpg January 22, 2007 Democratic
Treasurer of Maryland Nancy K. Kopp February 14, 2002 Democratic

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "General Information About the Board of Public Works". Maryland Board of Public Works. Retrieved 6 September 2009. 
  2. ^ a b Barnes, Robert (January 21, 1987). "New Treasurer Viewed As Check on Schaefer; Board of Public Works Has Enormous Power". The Washington Post. p. A13. 

External links[edit]