Maryland Department of Juvenile Services

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Maryland Department of Juvenile Services (DJS) is a state agency of Maryland, headquartered in One Center Plaza, Downtown Baltimore.[1] DJS operates juvenile correctional facilities.[2]

History[edit]

The agency currently known as the Maryland Department of Juvenile Service was originally created in the form of several training schools under the jurisdiction of the Maryland State Department of Education in 1922, transferred to the now-defunct Maryland Department of Public Welfare from 1943 to 1966, previously named as the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services from 1966 to 1969, reduced to subcabinet status as the Juvenile Services Administration of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene from 1969 to 1987, renamed as the Juvenile Services from 1987 to 1989, before being restored to Cabinet status as the Department of Juvenile Services from 1989 to 1995, as the Department of Juvenile Justice from 1995 to 2003, and under its current name since 2003.[3]

Facilities[edit]

DJS operates "youth centers," statewide facilities for sentenced male youth, and countywide holding facilities that serve youth of specific counties. The youth center system is headquartered in Cumberland.[4]

Youth centers:[4]

  • Backbone Mountain Youth Centers (Unincorporated Garrett County)
  • Green Ridge Youth Center (Unincorporated Allegany County)
  • Meadow Mountain Youth Center (Unincorporated Garrett County)
  • Savage Mountain Youth Center (Unincorporated Garrett County)

Countywide facilities:

The Thomas J. S. Waxter Center in unincorporated Howard County provides long-term secure confinement for up to ten girls and a detention program for up to 50 girls.[12] The Victor Cullen Center is a regional treatment center for boys for substance abuse and mental health issues.[13] The William Donald Schaefer House in Baltimore is a drug treatment center for boys in Baltimore.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Directions to DJS Headquarters." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  2. ^ "DJS Vision, Mission and Goals." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  3. ^ http://www.msa.md.gov/msa/mdmanual/19djj/html/djjh.html Department of Juvenile Services-Historical Evolution-Maryland State Archives
  4. ^ a b "Youth Centers." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  5. ^ "Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  6. ^ "J. DeWeese Carter Center." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  7. ^ "Cheltenham Youth Facility." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  8. ^ "Lower Eastern Shore Children's Center (LESCC)." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  9. ^ "Alfred D. Noyes Children's Center." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  10. ^ "Western Maryland Children's Center." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  11. ^ "Charles H. Hickey, Jr., School." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  12. ^ "Thomas J. S. Waxter Center." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  13. ^ "Victor Cullen Center." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  14. ^ "William Donald Schaefer House." Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.

External links[edit]