Maryland Route 175

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Maryland Route 175 marker

Maryland Route 175
Maryland Route 175 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by MDSHA
Length: 17.01 mi[1] (27.37 km)
Existed: 1927 – present
Major junctions
West end: Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia
 

US 29 in Columbia
MD 108 in Columbia
I‑95 near Columbia
US 1 near Jessup
MD 295 in Jessup
MD 713 near Fort Meade
MD 32 near Odenton

MD 170 in Odenton
East end: MD 3 in Millersville
Location
Counties: Howard, Anne Arundel
Highway system
MD 174 MD 176

Maryland Route 175 is a state highway in the U.S. state of Maryland. The highway runs 17.01 miles (27.37 km) from Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia east to MD 3 in Millersville. MD 175 is a major highway through the large unincorporated community of Columbia; the highway connects U.S. Route 29 (US 29) next to Columbia Town Center with Interstate 95 (I-95) and an industrial area on the eastern side of Howard County. MD 175 also connects Fort Meade with Jessup and Odenton in western Anne Arundel County, where it links MD 295 and MD 32 with the eastern part of the U.S. Army base. MD 175 is a part of the National Highway System as an intermodal freight transport connector from I-95 to Dorsey Run Road in Jessup.[2]

MD 175 was constructed from Ellicott City to Millersville in the late 1920s and early 1930s as part of three routes: MD 531 from MD 103 near Ellicott City to US 1 near Jessup, MD 175 from there to Fort Meade and north to Hanover, and MD 180 from Odenton to Millersville. The highway did not originally extend through Fort Meade; MD 175 was constructed through the military installation in the early 1940s as part of major upgrades to the highway from Jessup to Odenton due to its strategic importance. By 1946, MD 175 extended from Ellicott City to Millersville. The highway was widened from Odenton to Millersville in the late 1940s and from Ellicott City to Odenton in the mid-1950s. MD 175 was relocated at I-95 around 1970 and as a major highway through the newly constructed community of Columbia in the mid-1970s. The old portion of the highway from Ellicott City to the new highway became MD 108 and MD 104. There are plans to expand MD 175 to a multi-lane divided highway through Fort Meade due to increased activity at the Army post.

Route description[edit]

MD 175 begins just west of its bridges over the Little Patuxent River. The highway continues southwest as Little Patuxent Parkway, the county-maintained six-lane divided highway that forms the main street of Columbia Town Center. MD 175 heads east as Rouse Parkway, a four-lane divided controlled access highway; the highway was renamed from Little Patuxent Parkway to honor Columbia founder James Rouse and his wife Patty in 2006.[3] The highway immediately has a cloverleaf interchange with US 29 (Columbia Pike). MD 175 heads southeast through intersections with Thunder Hill Road, Tamar Drive, and Dobbin Road as it passes between the Columbia villages of Oakland Mills to the southwest and Long Reach to the northeast. The state highway expands to six lanes at Dobbin Road and has a partial cloverleaf interchange with Snowden River Parkway and a trumpet interchange with Columbia Gateway Drive. Access from eastbound MD 175 to Columbia Gateway Drive requires using the Snowden River Parkway interchange. MD 175 widens to eight lanes at Columbia Gateway Drive, a width the highway carries through its intersection with the eastern end of MD 108 (Waterloo Road) to the highway's partial cloverleaf interchange with I-95. The highway's name changes from Rouse Parkway to Waterloo Road at the MD 108 junction. MD 175 has six lanes from I-95 to east of its junction with US 1 (Washington Boulevard), which was the site of a tavern called Waterloo and before that Spurrier's Tavern.[1][4]

MD 175 drops to two lanes as it passes between the Maryland Wholesale Produce Distribution Center to the southwest and the Patuxent Institution on the northeast and enters Jessup. East of Dorsey Run Road, which leads to the Jessup Auto Distribution Center, the state highway crosses over CSX's Capital Subdivision and enters Anne Arundel County, where the highway's name changes to Jessup Road. East of the tracks, MD 175 meets the eastern end of unsigned MD 723 (Old Jessup Road), which accesses the Jessup station on MARC's Camden Line, which uses the Capital Subdivision tracks. The highway continues east past the former Maryland House of Correction and has a cloverleaf interchange with MD 295 (Baltimore–Washington Parkway), where the highway's name becomes Annapolis Road. MD 175 temporarily expands to four lanes at its intersection with MD 713, which heads south as Rockenbach Road into Fort Meade and north as Ridge Road toward Hanover. The highway passes through the eastern part of Fort Meade and expands to a four-lane road with center turn lane at Reece Road, which becomes MD 174 on the eastern boundary of the military installation.[1][4]

At the southeastern corner of the fort, MD 175 has a partial cloverleaf interchange with MD 32 (Patuxent Freeway) and enters Odenton. The highway crosses over the Amtrak Northeast Corridor and meets the southern end of MD 170 (Telegraph Road); the south leg of the intersection, Piney Orchard Parkway, leads to the Odenton station on MARC's Penn Line, which uses the Amtrak tracks. MD 175 continues as a four-lane undivided highway to a five-legged roundabout at the eastern end of Odenton where the highway meets Odenton Road, Higgins Drive, and Sappington Station Road, which is unsigned MD 32AA. The highway continues as a two-lane road past Arundel High School and through the village of Gambrills before reaching its eastern terminus at MD 3 (Robert Crain Highway) west of Millersville. MD 175 has separate intersections with southbound and northbound MD 3; Millersville Road continues east from the northbound intersection through the eponymous village and past the historic Childs Residence.[1][4]

History[edit]

The first section of MD 175 was constructed between 1924 and 1926 as a macadam road from US 1 southeast to the entrance of the Maryland House of Correction east of the B&O Railroad (now CSX) in Jessup.[5][6] MD 175 was extended as a concrete road east to its modern intersection with MD 713, then northeast along what later became MD 713 to MD 176 in Hanover in 1929.[7][8][9] The easternmost portion of MD 175, which was originally MD 180, was constructed as a concrete road starting in 1930 from MD 3 to the Pennsylvania Railroad (now Amtrak) in Odenton; the highway was complete west to Gambrills by the end of 1930.[7][8][9] The original western part of MD 175, from US 1 in Jessup to MD 103 in Ellicott City, was constructed as MD 531 in 1932.[9][10][11] The portion of the highway through Fort Meade was a public highway maintained by Anne Arundel County or the federal government through World War II.[10][12]

MD 180's crossing of the Pennsylvania Railroad was constructed in 1938.[13][14] The highway was relocated through Odenton using the new bridge in 1938 and 1939; the old road became MD 677.[9][13] MD 175's bridge over the B&O Railroad in Jessup was completed in 1942.[15][16] The highway was widened to a 24-foot (7.3 m) wide road with a concrete base and asphalt surface from Jessup to the MD 713 intersection in 1942.[15] MD 175 was also extended as a 24-foot (7.3 m) road through Fort Meade from MD 713 to west of Odenton between 1942 and 1944.[15][17] By 1946, MD 175 had been extended east over MD 180 to Millersville and west over MD 531 to Ellicott City; the portion of MD 175 from Fort Meade to MD 176 became MD 713.[18] MD 175 was widened from 16 to 22 feet (4.9 to 6.7 m) from Odenton to Millersville starting in 1948.[19] The highway was widened and resurfaced from Odenton to the newly constructed Baltimore–Washington Expressway interchange in 1954.[20] MD 175 was also widened with curve amelioration from US 1 to MD 103 between 1954 and 1956.[20][21]

MD 175's first divided highway section was created when the highway was relocated from US 1 to just north of the modern MD 108 intersection in conjunction with the construction of the I-95 interchange in 1969 and 1970.[22][23] The state highway's interchange with US 29 in Columbia was built in several stages. The westbound and eastbound bridges across the Little Patuxent River were built in 1970 and 1974, respectively.[24][25] The first parts of the interchange to open were the ramps between county-maintained Little Patuxent Parkway and southbound US 29.[26] MD 175's bridges over US 29 were built in 1974.[27] The interchange fully opened when the new Little Patuxent Parkway was completed from the existing highway at the present MD 108 interchange west to US 29 in 1977. The portion of MD 175 north of the new highway was replaced by an eastward extension of MD 108 and MD 104. The highway's trumpet interchange with Columbia Gateway Drive opened with Little Patuxent Parkway.[28] MD 175 was two lanes from US 29 to Columbia Gateway Drive until the road was expanded to a divided highway in 1987.[29] The highway's interchange with Snowden River Parkway was constructed in 2001.[30] MD 175's roundabout in Odenton was installed in 2004.[31]

The Maryland State Highway Administration plans to upgrade MD 175 from MD 295 in Jessup east to MD 170 in Odenton in response to the greatly increased traffic destined for Fort Meade due to the Base Realignment and Closure process. The state plans to expand MD 175 to a six-lane divided highway along the 5.2-mile (8.4 km) stretch, construct intersection improvements at MD 713, Reece Road, Mapes Road, and Charter Oaks Boulevard, and reconstruct the MD 295 interchange.[32][33] One of the first projects to begin construction is improvements at the MD 713 intersection, which started in 2011 and are expected to be completed in 2013.[34]

Junction list[edit]

County Location Mile
[1]
km Destinations Notes
Howard Columbia 0.00 0.00 Little Patuxent Parkway – Columbia Town Center Western terminus; end of state maintenance
0.32 0.51 US 29 (Columbia Pike) – Baltimore, Washington US 29 Exit 20
3.54 5.70 Snowden River Parkway Partial cloverleaf interchange
3.89 6.26 Columbia Gateway Drive Trumpet interchange
4.48 7.21 MD 108 west (Waterloo Road) – Ellicott City
5.19 8.35 I‑95 – Baltimore, Washington I-95 Exit 41
Jessup 5.65 9.09 US 1 (Washington Boulevard) – Laurel, Elkridge
Anne Arundel 8.59 13.82 MD 295 (Baltimore–Washington Parkway) – Baltimore, BWI Airport, Washington Cloverleaf interchange
Fort Meade 7.27 11.70 MD 713 (Ridge Road/Rockenbach Road) – Hanover, Fort Meade
Odenton 12.68 20.41 MD 32 (Patuxent Freeway) – Columbia, Annapolis MD 32 Exit 6
13.74 22.11 MD 170 north (Telegraph Road) / Piney Orchard Parkway south – Severn
14.74 23.72 Sappington Station Road north / Odenton Road west / Higgins Drive south Roundabout; Sappington Station Road is unsigned MD 32AA
Millersville 16.88 27.17 MD 3 south (Robert Crain Highway) – Bowie
17.01 27.37 MD 3 north (Robert Crain Highway) to I‑97 – Baltimore Southern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Auxiliary routes[edit]

  • MD 175AA is the designation for the 0.02-mile (0.032 km) section of Max Blob Park Road from the intersection of MD 175 and Clark Road south to the portion of Max Blob Park Road designated MD 917 just east of the MD 175–MD 295 interchange in Jessup.[1][35]
  • MD 175HC is the designation for the 0.37-mile (0.60 km) eastbound collector/distributor roadway from Snowden River Parkway east to MD 175's bridge over Columbia Gateway Drive, where MD 175HC merges with eastbound MD 175, in Columbia. The highway allows eastbound MD 175 and Snowden River Parkway traffic to access Columbia Gateway Drive.[1][36] Prior to the completion of the interchange between MD 175 and Snowden River Parkway, MD 175HC began just east of the intersection of the two roads.[30][37]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2013). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-11-20. 
  2. ^ Federal Highway Administration (October 1, 2012) (PDF). National Highway System: Baltimore, MD (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/national_highway_system/nhs_maps/maryland/baltimore_md.pdf. Retrieved 2012-12-30.
  3. ^ Blakely, Andrei (May 11, 2006). "Road Renamed After James and Patty Rouse". Howard County Times (Ellicott City, MD: Patuxent Publishing). Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  4. ^ a b c Google Inc. "Maryland Route 175". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Little+Patuxent+Pkwy&daddr=MD-175+W%2FAnnapolis+Rd+to:Annapolis+Rd+to:MD-175+E%2FAnnapolis+Rd&hl=en&sll=39.09916,-76.70517&sspn=0.130288,0.336113&geocode=FV2NVgIdvVJr-w%3BFaUjVQIdoPhs-w%3BFdxBVAIdm-lt-w%3BFWf4UwId7Fdu-w&t=h&mra=ls&z=11. Retrieved 2012-12-29.
  5. ^ Mackall, John N.; Darnall, R. Bennett; Brown, W.W. (January 1927). "Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland" (1924–1926 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 38. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  6. ^ Maryland Geological Survey. Map of Maryland: Showing State Road System and State Aid Roads (Map) (1927 ed.).
  7. ^ a b Uhl, G. Clinton; Bruce, Howard; Shaw, John K. (October 1, 1930). "Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland" (1927–1930 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 196–197. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  8. ^ a b Maryland Geological Survey. Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map) (1930 ed.).
  9. ^ a b c d Maryland State Roads Commission. General Highway Map: State of Maryland (Map) (1939 ed.).
  10. ^ a b Maryland Geological Survey. Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map) (1933 ed.).
  11. ^ Byron, William D.; Lacy, Robert (December 28, 1934). "Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland" (1931–1934 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 340. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  12. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission. Map of Maryland Showing Highways and Points of Interest (Map) (1940 ed.).
  13. ^ a b Beall, J. Glenn; Jarboe, Elmer R.; Obrecht, George F., Sr. (March 4, 1939). "Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland" (1937–1938 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 85, 87. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  14. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000020048010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  15. ^ a b c Whitman, Ezra B.; Webb, P. Watson; Thomas, W. Frank (March 15, 1943). "Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland" (1941–1942 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 42–43, 54, 85. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  16. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000130043010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  17. ^ Whitman, Ezra B.; Webb, P. Watson; Thomas, W. Frank (March 1, 1945). "Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland" (1943–1944 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 84–85. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  18. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1946–47 ed.).
  19. ^ Reindollar, Robert M.; George, Joseph M.; McCain, Russell H. (February 15, 1949). "Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland" (1947–1948 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 20. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  20. ^ a b McCain, Russell H.; Bennett, Edgar T.; Kelly, Bramwell (November 12, 1954). "Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland" (1953–1954 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 5, 61, 196, 216. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  21. ^ Bonnell, Robert O.; Bennett, Edgar T.; McMullen, John J. (November 2, 1956). "Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland" (1955–1956 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 205. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  22. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1969 ed.).
  23. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000130061013". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  24. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000130079010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  25. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000130087010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  26. ^ United States Geological Survey. Savage, MD quadrangle (Map). 1:24,000. 15 Minute Series (Topographic) (1976 ed.).
  27. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000130086014". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  28. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1977 ed.).
  29. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1987 ed.).
  30. ^ a b Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2001). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  31. ^ Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2004). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  32. ^ Dresser, Michael (October 13, 2010). "Md., Fort Meade Agree on BRAC Road Projects". The Baltimore Sun (Baltimore: Tribune Company). Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  33. ^ Lamothe, Dan (March 28, 2007). "Route 175 Project Plan Takes Shape". The Baltimore Sun (Baltimore: Tribune Company). Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  34. ^ Staff. "Project Information: MD 0175 DORSEY ROAD TC - MD713 (ROCKENBACH RD/RIDGE RD) TO E OF DISNEY RD/26TH ST (BRAC)". Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  35. ^ Google Inc. "Maryland Route 175AA". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Old+Clark+Rd&daddr=Old+Clark+Rd&hl=en&ll=39.138099,-76.752441&spn=0.004069,0.010504&sll=39.13827,-76.752527&sspn=0.002035,0.005252&geocode=FdEyVQIdUtls-w%3BFZozVQIdQdps-w&t=h&mra=ls&z=17. Retrieved 2013-01-01.
  36. ^ Google Inc. "Maryland Route 175HC". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Unknown+road&daddr=Unknown+road&hl=en&ll=39.188893,-76.809304&spn=0.008133,0.021007&sll=39.189308,-76.809433&sspn=0.002033,0.005252&geocode=FSr_VQIdrvFr-w%3BFQ70VQIdmQVs-w&t=h&mra=ls&z=16. Retrieved 2013-01-01.
  37. ^ Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2000). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2013-01-01. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing