Maryland Route 435

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Maryland Route 435 marker

Maryland Route 435
Maryland Route 435 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by MDSHA
Length: 1.16 mi[1] (1.87 km)
Major junctions
South end: MD 387 / MD 450 in Annapolis
 

MD 70 in Annapolis

MD 436 in Annapolis
North end: MD 450 in Annapolis
Location
Counties: Anne Arundel
Highway system
MD 432 MD 436

Maryland Route 435 (MD 435) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Maryland. The highway runs 1.16 miles (1.87 km) from MD 387 and MD 450 north to MD 450 within Annapolis. MD 435 connects MD 450 with the West Annapolis neighborhood and Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. The state highway was constructed along most of its current course in the late 1920s. MD 435 and MD 436 switched parts of their routes, with MD 435 attaining its presenting course, in the mid-1950s.

Route description[edit]

MD 435 begins at Westgate Circle, a roundabout whose other legs are MD 450 (West Street) and MD 387 (Spa Road). The highway heads north along Taylor Avenue, a two-lane municipally maintained road along the east side of Annapolis National Cemetery. MD 435 passes through an S-curve as it passes the Annapolis Police Department and an old railroad grade. The highway becomes state maintained just south of Rosedale Street. MD 435 curves to the east as it passes along the east side of Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, the home stadium of the Navy Midshipmen football team. The highway intersects MD 70 (Roscoe Rowe Boulevard) and meets the southern end of MD 436 (Ridgely Avenue) in the West Annapolis neighborhood. MD 435 turns south from Taylor Avenue onto Annapolis Street and enters the campus of the U.S. Naval Academy. The highway curves east again and reaches its eastern terminus at MD 450 (King George Street), which heads east across the Severn River and south toward downtown Annapolis.[1][2]

History[edit]

The Maryland State Roads Commission paved several streets with concrete in West Annapolis in 1929 and 1930; those streets became part of four state highways.[3][4] MD 435 was constructed as an 18-foot-wide (5.5 m) road beginning at the Annapolis, Washington and Baltimore Railroad.[4][5] The state highway followed Taylor Avenue north to Annapolis Street, continued north on Annapolis Street to Severn Avenue (now Melvin Avenue), then followed Severn Avenue to Wardour Drive.[4][6] The portion of modern MD 435 from Taylor Avenue to MD 2 (now MD 450) was MD 436. The two other state highways in West Annapolis were MD 437, which followed Revell Street (now Ridgely Avenue) from Taylor Avenue to Severn Avenue, and MD 438, which followed Severn Avenue west one block from Annapolis Street then north along what is now MD 436.[6]

MD 435 was extended south along Division Street to West Street, which then carried US 50 and MD 2, by 1946.[6][7] MD 435 assumed its modern routing between intersections with MD 450 in 1954.[8] The Annapolis Street part of MD 435 became the southernmost part of MD 436. The Melvin Avenue part of MD 435 became MD 438. MD 437 remained along Ridgely Avenue between Taylor Avenue and Melvin Avenue.[9] MD 436 assumed its modern routing and MD 437 and MD 438 were removed from the state highway system in 1975.[10] The portion of MD 435 south of Rosedale Street was transferred from state to municipal maintenance in 1978.[11] The Westgate Circle roundabout was installed in 1999.[12]

Junction list[edit]

The entire route is in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County.

Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 MD 387 south (Spa Road) / MD 450 (West Street) – Parole Southern terminus; Westgate Circle roundabout
0.81 1.30 MD 70 (Roscoe Rowe Boulevard)
0.92 1.48 MD 436 north (Ridgely Avenue)
1.16 1.87 MD 450 (King George Street) – Baltimore Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2011). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  2. ^ Google Inc. "Maryland Route 435". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Taylor+Ave&daddr=King+George+Dr&hl=en&ll=38.982631,-76.502094&spn=0.032626,0.084543&sll=38.983932,-76.493082&sspn=0.016313,0.042272&geocode=Fdq7UgIdHKFw-w%3BFY3pUgIdRbtw-w&t=h&mra=ls&z=14. Retrieved 2012-02-03.
  3. ^ Uhl, G. Clinton; Bruce, Howard; Shaw, John K. (October 1, 1930). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1927–1930 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 196–197. Retrieved 2013-02-03. 
  4. ^ a b c Maryland Geological Survey. Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map) (1930 ed.).
  5. ^ Byron, William D.; Lacy, Robert (December 28, 1934). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1931–1934 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 22. Retrieved 2013-02-03. 
  6. ^ a b c Maryland State Roads Commission. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1950 ed.).
  7. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1946–47 ed.).
  8. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1954 ed.).
  9. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1956 ed.).
  10. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1975–76 ed.).
  11. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1978 ed.).
  12. ^ Niederhauser, Mike (March 2002). "Modern Roundabouts in Maryland" (PDF). Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2013-02-03. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing