Maryland Terrapins men's basketball (1970–79)

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Contents: 1969–701970–711971–721972–731973–741974–751975–761976–771977–781978–79


1969–70[edit]

1969–70 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Ranking
Coaches #Not ranked
AP #Not ranked
1969–70 record 13–13 (5–9 ACC)
Head coach Lefty Driesell
Home arena Cole Field House
Seasons
« 1968–69 1970–71 »

The year 1969 was a turning point in Washington sports history. The University of Maryland had hired Lefty Driesell to coach basketball. The Senators named Ted Williams as manager. The Washington Redskins hired Vince Lombardi as Head Coach and he had brought a winning attitude to the nation's capital. It marked a renaissance in sports interest in America's most transient of cities.

Team Players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Round Pick Player NBA Club
9 151 Will Hetzel Baltimore Bullets

[1]

1970–71[edit]

1970–71 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Ranking
Coaches #Not ranked
AP #Not ranked
1970–71 record 14–12 (5–9 ACC)
Head coach Lefty Driesell
Home arena Cole Field House
Seasons
« 1969–70 1971–72 »

Team Players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Round Pick Player NBA Club
8 131 Barry Yates Philadelphia 76ers

[2]

1971–72[edit]

1971–72 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
NIT Champions
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Ranking
Coaches #11
AP #14
1971–72 record 27–5 (8–4 ACC)
Head coach Lefty Driesell
Home arena Cole Field House
Seasons
« 1970–71 1972–73 »

Lefty Driesell started the tradition of Midnight Madnessin 1971 with an unofficial session that was attended by 3,000 fans at the University of Maryland's football stadium, Byrd Stadium.[3][4]

National Invitation Tournament[edit]

  • First Round
    • Maryland 67, St. Josephs 55
  • Second Round
    • Maryland 71, Syracuse 65
  • Semifinal
    • Maryland 91, Jacksonville 77
  • Final
    • Maryland 100, Niagara 69[5]

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Tom McMillen, NIT Most Valuable Player
  • Tom McMillen, First Team All ACC[6]
  • Tom McMillen, Third Team All-American[7]

1972–73[edit]

1972–73 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Ranking
Coaches #10
AP #8
1972–73 record 23–7 (7–5 ACC)
Head coach Lefty Driesell
Home arena Cole Field House
Seasons
« 1971–72 1973–74 »

In the offseason, Tom McMillen was a member of the US national team that took part in Basketball at the 1972 Summer Olympics.

NCAA Basketball Tournament[edit]

  • East
    • Maryland 91, Syracuse 75
    • Providence 103, Maryland 89[8]

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Tom McMillen, Second Team All-American[7]
  • Tom McMillen, First Team All ACC[6]

Team Players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Round Pick Player NBA Club
3 37 Jim O’Brien Cleveland Cavaliers
10 155 Bob Bodell Seattle SuperSonics
14 186 Howard White Capitol Bullets

[9]

1973–74[edit]

1973–74 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Ranking
Coaches #4
AP #4
1973–74 record 23–5 (9–3 ACC)
Head coach Lefty Driesell
Home arena Cole Field House
Seasons
« 1972–73 1974–75 »

Maryland participated in the ACC Final. The Final pitted two of the top teams in the country. It has been regarded by many to be the greatest ACC game in history — and one of the greatest college games ever. The game was instrumental in forcing the expansion of the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship to 32 teams, allowing more than one bid from a conference. Maryland had six future NBA draft picks on the team. The six picks were Tom McMillen and Len Elmore (1974),[10] Tom Roy and Owen Brown (1975)[11] and John Lucas and Mo Howard (1976).[12] It is considered the greatest team that did not participate in the NCAA tournament.[13]

ACC Tournament[edit]

The 1974 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament was held in Greensboro, North Carolina at the Greensboro Coliseum from March 7–9. North Carolina State defeated Maryland in overtime 103–100 to claim the championship.

  • Quarterfinals (March 7): Maryland 85, Duke 66
  • Semifinals (March 8): Maryland 105, North Carolina 85
  • Finals (March 9): NC State 103, Maryland 100

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Lefty Driesell, NCAA Award of Valor[14]
  • Len Elmore, First Team All ACC
  • Len Elmore, Second Team All-American
  • John Lucas, First Team All ACC[6]
  • John Lucas, Second Team All-American
  • Tom McMillen, Second Team All-American[7]

Team Players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Round Pick Player NBA Club
1 9 Tom McMillen Buffalo Braves
1 13 Len Elmore Washington Bullets

[10]

1974–75[edit]

1974–75 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Ranking
Coaches #5
AP #5
1974–75 record 24–5 (10–2 ACC)
Head coach Lefty Driesell
Home arena Cole Field House
Seasons
« 1973–74 1975–76 »

In the offseason, John Lucas played for the US national team in the 1974 FIBA World Championship, winning the bronze medal.[15]

NCAA Basketball Tournament[edit]

  • Midwest
    • Maryland 83, Creighton 79
    • Maryland 83, Notre Dame 71
    • Louisville 96, Maryland 82[16]

Awards and honors[edit]

Team Players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Round Pick Player NBA Club
3 42 Tom Roy Portland Trail Blazers
9 147 Owen Brown Phoenix Suns

[11]

1975–76[edit]

1975–76 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Ranking
Coaches #11
AP #13
1975–76 record 22–6 (7–5 ACC)
Head coach Lefty Driesell
Home arena Cole Field House
Seasons
« 1974–75 1976–77 »

Awards and honors[edit]

  • John Lucas, First Team All-American[7]
  • John Lucas, First Team All ACC[6]

Team Players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Round Pick Player NBA Club
1 1 John Lucas Houston Rockets
2 32 Mo Howard Cleveland Cavaliers

[12]

1976–77[edit]

1976–77 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
1976–77 record 19–8 (7–5 ACC)
Head coach Lefty Driesell
Home arena Cole Field House
Seasons
« 1975–76 1977–78 »

Team Players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Round Pick Player NBA Club
1 15 Brad Davis Los Angeles Lakers
2 30 Steve Sheppard Chicago Bulls

[17]

1977–78[edit]

1977–78 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
1977–78 record 15–13 (3–9 ACC)
Head coach Lefty Driesell
Home arena Cole Field House
Seasons
« 1976–77 1978–79 »

Team Players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Round Pick Player NBA Club
4 81 Larry Boston Washington Bullets

[18]

1978–79[edit]

1978–79 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Ranking
Coaches #8
AP #8
1978–79 record 24–7 (11–3 ACC)
Head coach Lefty Driesell
Home arena Cole Field House
Seasons
« 1977–78 1979–80 »

Team Players drafted into the NBA[edit]

Round Pick Player NBA Club
3 52 Larry Gibson Milwaukee Bucks

[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.databasebasketball.com/draft/draftyear.htm?lg=N&yr=1970
  2. ^ http://www.databasebasketball.com/draft/draftyear.htm?lg=N&yr=1971
  3. ^ Pucin, Diane (2008-10-17). "No 'Midnight Madness' for UCLA, USC basketball teams". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2008-11-30. 
  4. ^ Rovell, Darren (2007-10-13). "Lefty's midnight run started all the Madness". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. Archived from the original on 2008-03-26. Retrieved 2008-11-30. 
  5. ^ http://www.nit.org/history/nit-postseason-results-1970s.html
  6. ^ a b c d e http://www.sportsstats.com/bball/awards/All-ACC
  7. ^ a b c d e http://www.sportsstats.com/bball/national/awards/All-American
  8. ^ http://www.databasesports.com/ncaab/tourney.htm?yr=1973
  9. ^ http://www.databasebasketball.com/draft/draftyear.htm?lg=N&yr=1973
  10. ^ a b http://www.databasebasketball.com/draft/draftyear.htm?lg=N&yr=1974
  11. ^ a b http://www.databasebasketball.com/draft/draftyear.htm?lg=N&yr=1975
  12. ^ a b http://www.databasebasketball.com/draft/draftyear.htm?lg=N&yr=1976
  13. ^ Bill Free – This Overtime Lasts 25 Years The 1974 team left it all out on the floor. Baltimore Sun, hosted at University of Maryland Terrapins athletic site, February 20, 1999
  14. ^ NCAA Award of Valor recipients
  15. ^ SEVENTH WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP – 1974
  16. ^ http://www.databasesports.com/ncaab/tourney.htm?yr=1975
  17. ^ http://www.databasebasketball.com/draft/draftyear.htm?lg=N&yr=1977
  18. ^ http://www.databasebasketball.com/draft/draftyear.htm?lg=N&yr=1978
  19. ^ http://www.databasebasketball.com/draft/draftyear.htm?lg=N&yr=1979

External links[edit]