Mas-ha

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Mas-ha
Other transcription(s)
 • Arabic مسحة
 • Also spelled Mas-ha (official)
Mas'ha, seen from the illegal Israeli settlement of Elkana
Mas'ha, seen from the illegal Israeli settlement of Elkana
Mas-ha is located in the Palestinian territories
Mas-ha
Mas-ha
Location of Mas-ha within the Palestinian territories
Coordinates: 32°06′28″N 35°03′06″E / 32.10778°N 35.05167°E / 32.10778; 35.05167Coordinates: 32°06′28″N 35°03′06″E / 32.10778°N 35.05167°E / 32.10778; 35.05167
Governorate Salfit
Government
 • Type Village Council
Population (2007)
 • Jurisdiction 2,003
Name meaning "Gravelly soil"[1]

Mas-ha (Arabic: مسحة‎) is a Palestinian village located in the Salfit Governorate in the northern West Bank, 37 kilometers southwest of Nablus. According to the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics, it had a population of 2,003 in 2007.[2]

History[edit]

Masha appeared in 1596 Ottoman tax registers as being in the Nahiya of Jabal Qubal of the Liwa of Nablus. It had a population of 5 households, all Muslim, and paid taxes on wheat, barley, summercrops, olive trees, occasional revenues, goats and beehives, and a press for olives or grapes.[3] French explorer Victor Guérin passed by the village in 1870, and estimated it as having about 300-350 inhabitants, and fig-tree lined borders.[4] In the 1882 "Survey of Western Palestine", Mes-ha was described as "a good-sized village, with a high central house, but partly ruinous. It is supplied by cisterns, and the houses are of stone."[5]

In a census conducted in 1922 by the British Mandate authorities, Mas-ha (called: Masha) had a population of 80, all Muslims,[6] while in the 1931 census it had 20 occupied houses and a population of 87, again all Muslim.[7] In 1945 the population was 110 while the total land area was 8,263 dunams, according to an official land and population survey.[8] Of this, 1,612 were allocated for plantations and irrigable land, 2,482 for cereals,[9] while 18 dunams were classified as built-up areas.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 239
  2. ^ 2007 PCBS Census Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics. p. 112.
  3. ^ Hütteroth and Kamal Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 131.
  4. ^ Guérin, 1875, p. 145 ff
  5. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, p. 286
  6. ^ Barron, 1923, Table IX, Sub-district of Nablus, p. 26
  7. ^ 1931 British Mandate Census p. 63.
  8. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in S. Hadawi, Village Statistics, 1945. PLO Research Center, 1970, p. 60
  9. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in S. Hadawi, Village Statistics, 1945. PLO Research Center, 1970, p. 107
  10. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in S. Hadawi, Village Statistics, 1945. PLO Research Center, 1970, p. 157

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]