Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district
Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Jim McGovern (DWorcester)
Cook PVI D+10[1]

Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district is located in central Massachusetts. It contains the cities of Worcester, which is the second-largest city in New England after Boston, and Northampton in the Pioneer Valley. It is represented by Democrat Jim McGovern.

The shape of the district was changed for the elections of 2012, after Massachusetts congressional redistricting to reflect the 2010 census.[2] The new district covers central Massachusetts, including much of Worcester County, and is largely the successor to the old 3rd District. Most of the old 2nd district, including Springfield, has been moved into the new 1st district.

Locations[edit]

Cities and towns currently in the district[edit]

In Franklin County: Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Leverett, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, and Whately.
In Hampden County: Precinct 1A in Palmer
In Hampshire County: Amherst, Belchertown, Hadley, Hatfield, Northampton, Pelham, and Ware.
In Norfolk County: Precincts 4A and 5 in Bellingham
In Worcester County: Athol, Auburn, Barre, Blackstone, Boylston, Douglas, Grafton, Hardwick, Holden, Hubbardston, Leicester, Leominster, Mendon, Millbury, Millville, New Braintree, North Brookfield, Northborough, Northbridge, Oakham, Oxford, Paxton, Petersham, Phillipston, Princeton, Royalston, Rutland, Shrewsbury, Spencer, Sterling, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, Uxbridge, Webster, West Boylston, West Brookfield, Westborough, Worcester, and Precinct 1 in Winchendon.

Cities and towns previously in the district[edit]

1795 to 1803[edit]

Known as the 2nd Western District.[3]

1803 to 1813[edit]

Known as the "Essex North" district.[3]

1813 to 1833[edit]

Known as the "Essex South" district.[3]

1843 to 1853[edit]

Detail of the district from 1843 to 1853.

The Act of September 16, 1842 established the district on the North Shore and New Hampshire border, with the following municipalities:[4]

In Essex County: Beverly, Danvers, Essex, Gloucester, Hamilton, Ipswich, Lynn, Lynnfield, Manchester, Marblehead, Middleton, Rockport, Salem, Saugus, Topsfield, and Wenham
In Middlesex County: Malden, Medford, Reading, South Reading, and Stoneham
In Suffolk County: Chelsea

1860s[edit]

"Parts of the counties of Bristol, Norfolk, and Plymouth."[5]

1870s-1900s[edit]

1903 to 1913[edit]

The district from 1903 to 1913.

During this decade, the district contained the following municipalities:[6]

In Franklin County: Bernardston, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Leverett, Montague, Northfield, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, and Whately.
In Hampshire County: Amherst, Belchertown, Easthampton, Enfield, Granby, Hadley, Hatfield, Northampton, Pelham, South Hadley, Ware, and Williamsburg.
In Hampden County: Agawam, Chicopee, East Longmeadow, Hampden, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Springfield, West Springfield, and Wilbraham.

1920s-2002[edit]

2003 to 2013[edit]

The district from 2003 to 2013

During this decade, the district contained the following municipalities:

In Hampden County: Agawam, Brimfield, Chicopee, East Longmeadow, Hampden, Holland, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Monson, Palmer, Springfield, Wales, Wilbraham.
In Hampshire County: Hadley, Northampton, South Hadley.
In Norfolk County: Bellingham.
In Worcester County: Blackstone, Brookfield, Charlton, Douglas, Dudley, East Brookfield, Grafton, Hopedale, Leicester, Mendon, Milford, Millbury, Millville, North Brookfield, Northbridge, Oxford, Southbridge, Spencer, Sturbridge, Sutton, Upton, Uxbridge, Warren, Webster.

List of representatives[edit]

Representative Party Years Electoral history
Goodhue.jpg Benjamin Goodhue Pro-
Administration
March 4, 1789 –
March 4, 1793
First elected in 1788
Re-elected in 1790
Redistricted to 1st district
DFoster.jpg Dwight Foster Pro-
Administration
General ticket:
March 4, 1793 –
March 4, 1795
Elected in 1792 as part of the four-seat general ticket
Redistricted to 4th district
TheodoreSedgwick.jpg Theodore Sedgwick Pro-
Administration
Redistricted from 4th district and elected here in 1792 as part of the four-seat general ticket
Redistricted to 1st district
Artemas Ward.jpg Artemas Ward Pro-
Administration
Redistricted from 7th district and elected here in 1792 as part of the four-seat general ticket
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
No image.svg William Lyman Anti-
Administration
First elected in 1792 as part of the four-seat general ticket
Re-elected in 1794 as the single representative from the district
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1795 –
March 4, 1797
Major General William shepard.jpg William Shepard Federalist March 4, 1797 –
March 4, 1803
First elected in 1796
Re-elected in 1798
Re-elected in 1800
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
Jacob Crowninshield.jpg Jacob Crowninshield Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1803 –
April 15, 1808
First elected in 1802
Re-elected in 1804
Re-elected in 1806
Died
Vacant April 15, 1808 –
May 24, 1808
Joseph Story.jpg Joseph Story Democratic-
Republican
May 23, 1808 –
March 4, 1809
Elected to finish Crowninshield's term
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
BenjaminPickman ca1843 byChesterHarding MFABoston.jpeg Benjamin Pickman, Jr. Federalist March 4, 1809 –
March 4, 1811
Elected in 1808
Retired
No image.svg William Reed Federalist March 4, 1811 –
March 4, 1815
First elected in 1810
Re-elected in 1812
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
TimothyPickering.jpg Timothy Pickering Federalist March 4, 1815 –
March 4, 1817
Redistricted from 3rd district and elected here in 1814
Lost re-election
Nathaniel Silsbee.png Nathaniel Silsbee Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1817 –
March 4, 1821
First elected in 1816
Re-elected in 1818
Retired
No image.svg Gideon Barstow Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1821 –
March 4, 1823
Elected in 1820
Retired
BWCrowninshield.jpg Benjamin W. Crowninshield Adams-Clay
Republican
March 4, 1823 –
March 4, 1825
First elected in 1822
Re-elected in 1824
Re-elected in 1826
Re-elected in 1828
Lost re-election
Adams March 4, 1825 –
March 4, 1829
Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1829 –
March 4, 1831
RufusChoate Southworth Hawes-crop.png Rufus Choate Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1831 –
June 30, 1834
First elected in 1830
Re-elected in 1832
Resigned
Vacant June 30, 1834 –
December 1, 1834
Stephen Clarendon Phillips.png Stephen C. Phillips Anti-
Jacksonian
December 1, 1834 –
March 3, 1837
First elected to finish Choate's term
Also elected to the full term in 1834
Re-elected in 1836

Resigned to become Mayor of Salem

Whig March 4, 1837 –
September 28, 1838
Leverett Saltonstall I.png Leverett Saltonstall Whig December 5, 1838 –
March 4, 1843
First elected to finish Phillips's term in 1838
Also elected to the full term in 1838
Re-elected in 1840
Lost re-election
Daniel Putnam King (1801-1850).jpg Daniel P. King Whig March 4, 1843 –
July 25, 1850
First elected in 1842
Re-elected in 1844
Re-elected in 1846
Re-elected in 1848
Died
Vacant July 25, 1850 –
March 4, 1851
RRantoul.jpg Robert Rantoul, Jr. Democratic March 4, 1851 –
August 7, 1852
First elected in 1850
Died
Vacant August 7, 1852 –
December 13, 1852
No image.svg Francis B. Fay Whig December 13, 1852 –
March 4, 1853
Elected to finish Rantoul's term
Retired
Samuel Leonard Crocker.png Samuel L. Crocker Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 4, 1855
Elected in 1852
Lost re-election
JBuffington.jpg James Buffington[7] American March 4, 1855 –
March 4, 1857
First elected in 1854
Re-elected in 1856
Re-elected in 1858
Re-elected in 1860
Retired
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 4, 1863
Oakes Ames - Brady-Handy.jpg Oakes Ames[5] Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 4, 1873
First elected in 1862
Re-elected in 1864
Re-elected in 1866
Re-elected in 1868
Re-elected in 1870
Retired
BWHarris.jpg Benjamin W. Harris[8][9] Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 4, 1883
First elected in 1872
Re-elected in 1874
Re-elected in 1876
Re-elected in 1878
Re-elected in 1880
Retired
John Davis Long.jpg John D. Long Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 4, 1889
First elected in 1882
Re-elected in 1884
Re-elected in 1886
Retired
Elijah A. Morse.png Elijah A. Morse Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 4, 1893
First elected in 1888
Re-elected in 1890
Redistricted to 12th district
Frederick Gillett.jpg Frederick H. Gillett[10][11] Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 4, 1925
First elected in 1892
Re-elected in 1894
Re-elected in 1896
Re-elected in 1898
Re-elected in 1900
Re-elected in 1902
Re-elected in 1904
Re-elected in 1906
Re-elected in 1908
Re-elected in 1910
Re-elected in 1912
Re-elected in 1914
Re-elected in 1916
Re-elected in 1918
Re-elected in 1920
Re-elected in 1922
Retired to run for U.S. Senate
GeorgeBChurchill.jpg George B. Churchill Republican March 4, 1925 –
July 1, 1925
Elected in 1924
Died
Vacant July 1, 1925 –
September 29, 1925
No image.svg Henry L. Bowles Republican September 29, 1925 –
March 4, 1929
First elected to finish Churchill's term
Re-elected in 1926
Retired
No image.svg Will Kirk Kaynor Republican March 4, 1929 –
December 20, 1929
Elected in 1928
Died
Vacant December 20, 1929 –
February 11, 1930
No image.svg William J. Granfield Democratic February 11, 1930 –
January 3, 1937
First elected to finish Kaynor's term
Also elected to full term in 1930
Re-elected in 1932
Re-elected in 1932
Re-elected in 1934
Retired
No image.svg Charles R. Clason[12] Republican January 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1949
First elected in 1936
Re-elected in 1938
Re-elected in 1940
Re-elected in 1942
Re-elected in 1944
Re-elected in 1946
Lost re-election
Foster Furcolo.jpg Foster Furcolo Democratic January 3, 1949 –
September 30, 1952
First elected in 1948
Re-elected in 1950
Retired and then resigned early when appointed State Treasurer
Vacant September 30, 1952 –
January 3, 1953
Edward Boland (1961).jpg Edward Boland[13] Democratic January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1989
First elected in 1952
Re-elected in 1954
Re-elected in 1956
Re-elected in 1958
Re-elected in 1960
Re-elected in 1962
Re-elected in 1964
Re-elected in 1966
Re-elected in 1968
Re-elected in 1970
Re-elected in 1972
Re-elected in 1974
Re-elected in 1976
Re-elected in 1978
Re-elected in 1980
Re-elected in 1982
Re-elected in 1984
Re-elected in 1986
Retired
Richardneal.jpg Richard Neal[14] Democratic January 3, 1989 –
January 3, 2013
First elected in 1988
Re-elected in 1990
Re-elected in 1992
Re-elected in 1994
Re-elected in 1996
Re-elected in 1998
Re-elected in 2000
Re-elected in 2002
Re-elected in 2004
Re-elected in 2006
Re-elected in 2008
Re-elected in 2010
Redistricted to the 1st district
Jim McGovern, official 111th Congress photo.jpg Jim McGovern Democratic January 3, 2013 –
Present
Redistricted from 3rd district
and elected here in 2012
Representative Party Years Electoral history

Recent election results[edit]

U.S. House election, 1988: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 156,262 80.23
Communist Louis R. Godena 38,446 19.74
Write-in 52 0.01
Majority 117,816 60.40
Turnout
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 1990: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 134,152 67.99 -12.24
Write-in 63,169 32.01 +32.00
Majority 70,983 35.98 -24.42
Turnout 197,321
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 1992: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 131,215 53.09 -14.90
Republican Anthony W. Ravosa, Jr. 76,795 31.07 +31.07
Independent Thomas R. Sheehan 38,963 15.76 +15.76
Write-in 190 0.07 -31.94
Majority 54,420 22.02 -13.96
Turnout 247,163
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 1994: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 117,178 58.55 +5.46
Republican John M. Briare 72,732 36.34 +5.27
Natural Law Kate Ross 10,167 5.08 +5.08
Write-in 46 0.02 -0.05
Majority 44,446 22.21 +0.19
Turnout 200,123
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 1996: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 162,995 71.67 +13.12
Republican Mark Steele 49,885 21.94 -14.40
Independent Scott Andrichak 9,181 4.04 +4.04
Natural Law Richard Kaynor 5,124 2.25 -2.83
Write-in 226 0.10 +0.08
Majority 113,110 49.74 +27.53
Turnout 227,411
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 1998: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 130,550 98.95 +27.28
Write-in 1,383 1.05 +0.95
Majority 129,167 97.90 +48.16
Turnout 131,933
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 2000: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 196,670 98.91 -0.04
Write-in 2,176 1.09 +0.04
Majority 194,494 97.81 -0.09
Turnout 253,867
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 2002: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 153,387 99.13 +0.22
Write-in 1,341 0.87 -0.22
Majority 152,046 98.26 +0.45
Turnout 208,498
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 2004: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 217,682 98.96 -0.17
Write-in 2,282 1.04 +0.17
Majority 227,183 97.92 -0.34
Turnout 287,871
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 2006: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 164,939 98.65 -0.31
Write-in 2,254 1.35 +0.31
Majority 162,685 97.30 -0.62
Turnout 214,939
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 2008: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 234,369 98.47 -0.18
Write-in 3,631 1.53 +0.18
Majority 230,738 96.95 -0.35
Turnout 306,820
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 2010: Massachusetts, District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Richard Neal 122,751 57.33 -41.14
Republican Thomas A. Wesley 91,209 42.60 +42.60
Write-in 164 0.08 -1.45
Majority 31,542 14.73 -82.12
Turnout 220,424
Democratic hold Swing

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008". The Cook Political Report. 2012. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  2. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/spr/sprcat/catpdf2010/cong2010/CongressionalDistrict_2011State.pdf Access Date March 29, 2012
  3. ^ a b c "United States - Massachusetts - MA - District 02". Our Campaigns. April 14, 2011. Retrieved February 11, 2012. 
  4. ^ "State Apportionment; districts of the Commonwealth for the choice of one representative to Congress in each district". Massachusetts Register ... for 1843. Boston: Loring. 
  5. ^ a b Ben. Perley Poore (1869). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the First Session of the Forty-First Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  6. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 64th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1916. 
  7. ^ "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress. Washington DC: House of Representatives. 1861. 
  8. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1878). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 45th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  9. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1882). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 47th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  10. ^ L.A. Coolidge (1897). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Fifth Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  11. ^ A.J. Halford (1909). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 60th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  12. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 75th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1938. 
  13. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 90th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1968. 
  14. ^ "Massachusetts". 1991-1992 Official Congressional Directory: 102nd Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1991. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 42°23′06″N 72°07′07″W / 42.38500°N 72.11861°W / 42.38500; -72.11861