Massachusetts's 6th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Massachusetts's 6th congressional district
Current Representative John F. Tierney (DSalem)
Area 480.31 mi²
Distribution 63.15% urban, 36.85% rural
Population (2000) 636,554
Median income $76,942[1]
Ethnicity 89.8% White,
2.2% Black,
2.5% Asian,
4.4% Hispanic,
0.2% Native American,
0.9% other
Occupation 17.2% blue collar,
69.7% white collar,
13.1% gray collar
Cook PVI D+7[2]
Massachusetts's current districts, since 2013

Massachusetts's 6th congressional district is in northeastern Massachusetts. It contains most of Essex County, including the North Shore and Cape Ann. It is represented by John F. Tierney, who has represented the district since January 1997. The shape of the district went through minor changes effective from the elections of 2012 after Massachusetts congressional redistricting to reflect the 2010 census. The towns of Tewsksbury and Billerica were added, along with a small portion of the town of Andover.[3]

Cities and towns in the district[edit]

In Essex County:

The cities of: Amesbury, Beverly, Gloucester, Lynn, Newburyport, Peabody, and Salem
The towns of: Andover: Precincts 1, 7A, 8, and 9A, Boxford, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Groveland, Hamilton, Ipswich, Lynnfield, Manchester, Marblehead, Merrimac, Middleton, Nahant, Newbury, North Andover, Rockport, Rowley, Salisbury, Saugus, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham, and West Newbury.

In Middlesex County:

The towns of: Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, North Reading, Reading, Tewksbury, Wakefield and Wilmington.

Cities and towns in the district prior to 2013[edit]

1840s[edit]

"Amherst, Belchertown, East-Hampton, Enfield, Granby, Greenwich, Hadley, Hatfield, Northampton, Pelham, Prescott, South Hadley, and Ware, in the County of Hampshire; Brimfield, Holland, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Monson, Palmer, Southwick, Springfield, Wales, Westfield, West Springfield, and Wilbraham, in the County of Hampden; Bernardston, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Leverett, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, and Whately in the County of Franklin; and Athol and Royalston, in the County of Worcester."[4]

1850s[edit]

"The cities of Lynn, Newburyport, and Salem, and the towns of Amesbury, Beverly, Essex, Georgetown, Gloucester, Groveland, Hamilton, Ipswich, Manchester, Marblehead, Newbury, Rockport, Rowley, Salisbury, Wenham, and West Newbury, in the county of Essex."[5]

1890s[edit]

"Suffolk County: City of Boston, wards 3, 4, and 5, and the towns of Chelsea, Revere, and Winthrop. Middlesex County: Towns of Everett, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Reading, Stoneham, Wakefield, and Winchester. Essex County: Towns of Lynn, Nahant, Saugus, and Swampscott."[6]

1910s[edit]

"Essex County: Cities of Beverly, Gloucester, Haverhill, Newburyport, and Salem; towns of Amesbury, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Groveland, Hamilton, Ipswich, Manchester, Marblehead, Merrimac, Newbury, Rockport, Rowley, Salisbury, Swampscott, Topsfleld, Wenham, and West Newbury."[7]

1920s-1980s[edit]

1990s[edit]

"Counties: Essex, Middlesex. Cities and townships: Amesbury, Bedford, Beverly, Boxford, Burlington, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Gloucester, Groveland, Hamilton, Haverhill, Ipswich, Lynn, Lynnfield, Manchester by the Sea, Marblehead, Merrimac, Middleton, Nahant, Newbury, Newburyport, North Andover, North Reading, Peabody, Reading (part), Rockport, Rowley, Salem, Salisbury, Saugus, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham, West Newbury, and Wilmington."[8]

2003 to 2013[edit]

The district from 2003 to 2013

In Essex County:

The cities of: Amesbury, Beverly, Gloucester, Lynn, Newburyport, Peabody, and Salem
The towns of: Boxford, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Groveland, Hamilton, Ipswich, Lynnfield, Manchester, Marblehead, Merrimac, Middleton, Nahant, Newbury, North Andover, Rockport, Rowley, Salisbury, Saugus, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham, and West Newbury.

In Middlesex County:

The towns of: Bedford, Burlington, North Reading, Reading, Wakefield and Wilmington.

List of representatives[edit]

Representative Party Years Note
George Thatcher.jpg George Thatcher Pro-
Administration
March 4, 1789 –
March 4, 1791
Redistricted to 8th district
George Leonard of Congress.jpg George Leonard Pro-
Administration
March 4, 1791 –
March 4, 1793
Redistricted from the 7th district
District discontinued March 4, 1793 –
March 4, 1795
John Reed, Sr. Federalist March 4, 1795 –
March 4, 1801
Retired
Josiah Smith Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1801 –
March 4, 1803
Retired
Samuel Taggart Federalist March 4, 1803 –
March 4, 1817
Retired
Samuel C. Allen Federalist March 4, 1817 –
March 4, 1823
Redistricted to 7th district
John Locke Adams-Clay
Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1823 –
March 4, 1825
Retired
Adams March 4, 1825 –
March 4, 1829
Joseph G. Kendall Anti-Jackson March 4, 1829 –
March 4, 1833
Retired
George Grennell, Jr. Anti-Jackson March 4, 1833 –
March 4, 1837
Redistricted from the 7th district

Retired
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 4, 1839
James Alvord Whig March 4, 1839 –
September 27, 1839
Died
Vacant September 27, 1839 –
January 14, 1840
Osmyn Baker.jpg Osmyn Baker Whig January 14, 1840 –
March 4, 1845
Retired
George Ashmun.png George Ashmun Whig March 4, 1845 –
March 4, 1851
Retired
George T. Davis Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 4, 1853
Retired
Charles Wentworth Upham.png Charles W. Upham Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 4, 1855
Lost re-election
Timothy Davis Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 4, 1857
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 4, 1859
John B. Alley[9] Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 4, 1863
Redistricted to the 5th district
Daniel W Gooch.png Daniel W. Gooch Republican March 4, 1863 –
September 1, 1865
Redistricted from the 7th district

Lost re-election
Vacant September 2, 1865 –
December 3, 1865
Nathaniel Prentice Banks.jpg Nathaniel P. Banks[10] Republican December 4, 1865 –
March 4, 1873
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
Bfbutler.jpg Benjamin F. Butler Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 4, 1875
Redistricted from the 5th district

Lost re-election
Charles Thompson Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 4, 1877
Lost re-election
George B. Loring - Brady-Handy.jpg George B. Loring[11] Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 4, 1881
Lost renomination
Eben Francis Stone CDV by John Adams Whipple, 1862.jpg Eben F. Stone[12] Republican March 4, 1881 –
March 4, 1883
Retired
Henry B. Lovering.png Henry B. Lovering Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 4, 1887
Lost re-election
Cabotlodgenationalportrait.jpg Henry Cabot Lodge Republican March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1893
Resigned to become U.S. Senator
William Cogswell2.jpg William Cogswell Republican March 4, 1893 –
May 22, 1895
Redistricted from the 7th district, Died
Vacant May 22, 1895 –
November 4, 1895
WHMoody.jpg William H. Moody[13] Republican November 5, 1895 –
May 1, 1902
First elected to finish Cogswell's term

Resigned to become Secretary of the Navy
Vacant May 2, 1902 –
November 3, 1902
Augustus P. Gardner.png Augustus P. Gardner[14] Republican November 4, 1902 –
May 15, 1917
Resigned to enter the army
Vacant May 15, 1917 –
November 6, 1917
Willfred W. Lufkin.png Willfred W. Lufkin Republican November 6, 1917 –
June 30, 1921
First elected to finish Gardner's term

Resigned to accept the position of Collector of Customs for the Port of Boston
Vacant June 30, 1921 –
September 27, 1921
Abram Piatt Andrew 1909.jpg Abram Andrew Republican September 27, 1921 –
June 3, 1936
First elected to finish Lufkin's term

Died
Vacant June 3, 1936 –
January 3, 1937
George J. Bates.png George J. Bates[15] Republican January 3, 1937 –
November 1, 1949
Died in a plane crash
Vacant November 1, 1949 –
February 14, 1950
William H. Bates[16] Republican February 14, 1950 –
June 22, 1969
First elected to finish his father's term

Died
Vacant June 22, 1969 –
September 30, 1969
Michael J. Harrington.jpg Michael J. Harrington Democratic September 30, 1969 –
January 3, 1979
First elected to finish Bates's term

Retired
MavroulesNicholas.jpg Nicholas Mavroules[17] Democratic January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1993
First elected in 1978


Lost re-election
Torkildsen.jpg Peter G. Torkildsen Republican January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1997
First elected in 1992


Lost re-election
John F Tierney congressional portrait 2009.jpg John F. Tierney Democratic January 3, 1997 –
Present
First elected in 1996

Recent election results[edit]

Massachusetts's 6th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John F. Tierney (incumbent) 142,456 56.9%
Republican Bill Hudak 107,739 43.1%
Totals 250,195 100%
Voter turnout  %
Massachusetts's 6th congressional district election, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John F. Tierney (incumbent) 179,603 48.3%
Republican Richard Tisei 175,953 47.3%
Libertarian Daniel Fishman 16,668 4.4%
Totals 372,224 100%
Voter turnout  %

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fast Facts for Congress: Congressional District 6, Massachusetts - Fact Sheet: 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates: Profile of Selected Economic Characteristics". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008". The Cook Political Report. 2012. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  3. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/spr/sprcat/catpdf2010/cong2010/CongressionalDistrict_2011State.pdf Access date: March 21, 2012.
  4. ^ John Hayward (1849). "Congressional Districts". Gazetteer of Massachusetts. Boston: J.P. Jewett & Co. 
  5. ^ "Congressional Districts". Massachusetts Register 1862. Boston: Adams, Sampson, & Co. 
  6. ^ W.H. Michael (1890). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-First Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  7. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 64th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1916. 
  8. ^ Congressional Directory for the 105th Congress (1997-1998), Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1997, retrieved November 26, 2013 
  9. ^ "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress. Washington DC: House of Representatives. 1861. 
  10. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1869). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the First Session of the Forty-First Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  11. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1878). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 45th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  12. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1882). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 47th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  13. ^ L.A. Coolidge (1897). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Fifth Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  14. ^ A.J. Halford (1909). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 60th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  15. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 75th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1938. 
  16. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 90th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1968. 
  17. ^ "Massachusetts". 1991-1992 Official Congressional Directory: 102nd Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1991. 

External links[edit]

Maps[edit]

Election results[edit]

Coordinates: 42°37′02″N 70°53′07″W / 42.61722°N 70.88528°W / 42.61722; -70.88528