Massachusetts Peace Society

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
James Libby Tryon (1864-1958) of the Massachusetts Peace Society in 1916. He was a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The Massachusetts Peace Society (1815–1828) was an anti-war organization[1] in Boston, Massachusetts, established to "diffuse light on the subject of war, and to cultivate the principles and spirit of peace."[2] Founding officers included Thomas Dawes, William Phillips, Elisha Ticknor, Thomas Wallcut and Noah Worcester.[3] In 1828 the society "merged into the newly formed American Peace Society."[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Massachusetts register and United States calendar for the year of our Lord 1829, Boston: Manning & Loring, 1829, OCLC 1770853 
  2. ^ Massachusetts Peace Society. Boston Recorder, 02-28-1816
  3. ^ The Massachusetts register and United States calendar for the year of our Lord 1817, Boston: Loring, 1817 
  4. ^ http://www.swarthmore.edu/Library/peace/DG001-025/dg020MassPeaceSociety.htm Retrieved 2010-09-04
  5. ^ James Libby Tryon. The Rise of the Peace Movement. Yale Law Journal, Vol. 20, No. 5 (Mar., 1911)

Further reading[edit]

  • Noah Worcester. Correspondence between the Massachusetts Peace Society and the Emperor of Russia and Prince Gallitzin. Niles' Weekly Register, Oct. 18, 1817.
  • Friend of Peace. v.2 (1821); v.4 (1827). Includes annual reports of the society.
  • John Gallison. Address, delivered at the fourth anniversary of the Massachusetts peace society, Dec. 25, 1819. Cambridge: printed by Hilliard & Metcalf, 1820.
  • Josiah Quincy. Address, delivered at the fourth anniversary of the Massachusetts peace society, Dec. 25, 1820. Cambridge: printed by Hilliard & Metcalf, 1821.
  • Tyler Bigelow. Address, delivered at the eighth anniversary of the Massachusetts peace society, Dec. 25, 1823. Boston: Printed by John B. Russell, 1824.

External links[edit]