Massachusetts general election, 1994

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A Massachusetts general election was held on November 8, 1994 in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

The election included:

Democratic and Republican candidates were selected in party primaries held September 20, 1994.

Statewide elections[edit]

United States Senator[edit]

Democratic incumbent Ted Kennedy was re-elected over Republican Mitt Romney, Libertarian Mary Fridley, and LaRouche Was Right candidate William A. Ferguson, Jr. It was the closest re-election race of Senator Kennedy's career.

Governor & Lieutenant Governor[edit]

Republicans William Weld and Paul Cellucci were re-elected Governor and Lieutenant Governor, respectively, over Democratic candidates Mark Roosevelt and Bob Massie. Weld's 43% margin of victory is the largest in the history of Massachusetts Gubernatorial elections.

Attorney General[edit]

Democrat Scott Harshbarger was reelected Attorney General. He defeated Republican Janis M. Berry in the general election.

Massachusetts Attorney General Republican Primary, 1994 [1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Janis M. Berry 138,875 71.09%
Republican Guy Carbone 56,288 28.81%
Write-in 215 0.00%
Massachusetts Attorney General Election, 1994 [2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Scott Harshbarger 1,472,621 70.47%
Republican Janis M. Berry 616,509 29.50%
Write-in 486 0.02%

Secretary of the Commonwealth[edit]

Incumbent Secretary of the Commonwealth Michael J. Connolly did not for reelection. Democrat William F. Galvin defeated former State Representative Augusto Grace in the Democratic primary and Republican State Senator Arthur E. Chase and Libertarian Peter C. Everett in the general election.

Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth Democratic Primary, 1994 [3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic William F. Galvin 262,018 63.72%
Democratic Augusto Grace 148,785 36.18%
Write-in 418 0.00%
Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth Republican Primary, 1994 [4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Arthur E. Chase 97,079 50.13%
Republican Peter Forman 96,362 49.76%
Write-in 186 0.00%
Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth Election, 1994 [5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic William F. Galvin 1,077,506 54.73%
Republican Arthur E. Chase 813,068 41.30%
Libertarian Peter C. Everett 77,584 3.94%
Write-in 567 0.03%

Treasurer and Receiver-General[edit]

Republican Joe Malone was re-elected Treasurer and Receiver-General. He defeated Democrat State Representative Shannon P. O'Brien, Independent Tom Tierney and Libertarian Sue Poulin.

Massachusetts Treasurer and Receiver-General Election, 1994 [6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Joe Malone 1,319,916 63.02%
Democratic Shannon P. O'Brien 669,567 31.97%
Independent Tom Tierney 60,000 2.87%
Libertarian Sue Poulin 44,702 2.13%
Write-in 240 0.01%

Auditor[edit]

Democrat A. Joseph DeNucci was re-elected Auditor. He defeated Republican Tim Clark and Libertarian candidate Geoff M. Weil.

Massachusetts Auditor Republican Primary, 1994 [7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Tim Clark 121,419 70.24%
Republican Earle Stroll 51,449 29.76%
Write-in 497 0.00%
Massachusetts Auditor General Election, 1994 [8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic A. Joseph DeNucci 1,432,301 72.03%
Republican Tim Clark 503,064 25.30%
Libertarian Geoff M. Weil 52,698 2.65%
Write-in 421 0.02%

Ballot questions[edit]

Question 1[edit]

Law Proposed by Initiative Petition - This proposed law would limit the way in which business and certain nonprofit corporations could contribute to and spend money on campaigns involving an initiative, referendum or other question submitted to the voters at a state or local election. The proposed law would require ballot committees organized to support or oppose any question to the voters to disclose promptly certain contributions made late in the campaign; would establish procedures that business and certain nonprofit corporations would have to follow in order to spend money on ballot question campaigns; and would establish voluntary spending limits for ballot committees.[9]


Law Proposed by Initiative Petition [10]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 822,065 40.14%
No 1,225,725 59.86%

Question 2[edit]

Referendum on an Existing Law - This law requires drivers and passengers in certain motor vehicles on public ways to wear properly adjusted and fastened safety belts.[11]


Referendum on an Existing Law [12]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 1,240,271 59.48%
No 844,755 40.52%

Question 3[edit]

Referendum on an Existing Law - This law eliminates one of the two ways in which students may authorize fees to be assessed on tuition bills at state-operated colleges and universities to support nonpartisan student organizations that attempt to influence state legislation.[13]


Referendum on an Existing Law [14]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 964,871 48.84%
No 1,011,474 51.16%

Question 4[edit]

Law Proposed by Initiative Petition - This proposed law would prevent the name of a person from being printed on a state primary ballot as a candidate for one of a number of specified state and federal offices, if the person as already served a certain number of consecutive terms in that office within a fixed period preceding the end of the then-current term of office. If such a person were still elected by write-in vote to one of the state offices (except for the office of Governor), the person would serve without a salary, and in some of the state offices, without payment for certain expenses.[15]


Law Proposed by Initiative Petition [16]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 1,047,927 51.56%
No 984,571 48.44%

Question 5[edit]

Law Proposed by Initiative Petition - This proposed law would allow retain stores to open at any time on Sundays and on the legal holidays of Memorial Day, July Fourth, and Labor Day. It would not affect the current restrictions on the sale of alcoholic beverages on Sundays and these holidays. Stores opening under the proposed law would be required to pay most employees at least one-half times their regular rate.[17]


Law Proposed by Initiative Petition [18]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 1,100,994 52.65%
No 990,057 47.35%

Question 6[edit]

Constitutional Amendment Proposed by Initiative Petition - This proposed constitutional amendment would require Massachusetts income tax rates to be graduated, in order to distribute the burden of the tax fairly and equitably. The proposed amendment would require the rates for taxpayers in higher income brackets to be higher than the rates for taxpayers in lower income brackets. The proposed amendment would also allow the state Legislature to grant reasonable exemptions and abatements and establish the number and range of tax brackets. The proposed amendment would eliminate from the Massachusetts Constitution the present requirement that income taxes must be levied at a uniform rate throughout the state upon incomes derived from the same class of property.[19]


Constitutional Amendment Proposed by Initiative Petition [20]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 630,694 30.42%
No 1,442,404 69.58%

Question 7[edit]

Law Proposed by Initiative Petition - This proposed law would change the state personal income tax laws if a proposed amendment to the Massachusetts Constitution requiring income tax rates to be graduated is approved at the 1994 state election.[21]


Law Proposed by Initiative Petition [22]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 599,917 29.10%
No 1,461,950 70.90%

Question 8[edit]

Law Proposed by Initiative Petition - This proposed law would increase the portion of the gasoline tax revenue that would be credited to the state Highway Fund; prohibit the transfer of money from the Highway Fund to other state funds for other purposes; declare that citizens have a right to a safe and efficient public highway, road and bridge system and require the state to develop a comprehensive seven-year state transportation plan; and make certain other changes in state finance laws relating to the Highway Fund.[23]


Law Proposed by Initiative Petition [24]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 1,500,238 74.01%
No 526,809 25.99%

Question 9[edit]

Law Proposed by Initiative Petition - This proposed law would prohibit rent control for most privately owned housing unites in Massachusetts, and would nullify certain existing rent control laws, except that cities and towns would be authorized to adopt a restricted form of rent control for a six-month period, after which compliance by property owners would be voluntary.[25]


Law Proposed by Initiative Petition [26]
Candidate Votes % ±%
Yes 1,034,599 51.34%
No 980,736 48.66%

References[edit]