Massafra

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Massafra
Comune
Città di Massafra
Coat of arms of Massafra
Coat of arms
Massafra is located in Italy
Massafra
Massafra
Location of Massafra in Italy
Coordinates: 40°35′N 17°7′E / 40.583°N 17.117°E / 40.583; 17.117Coordinates: 40°35′N 17°7′E / 40.583°N 17.117°E / 40.583; 17.117
Country Italy
Region Apulia
Province Taranto (TA)
Frazioni Cernera, Chiatona, Citignano, Marina di Ferrara
Government
 • Mayor Martino Carmelo Tamburrano
Area
 • Total 125 km2 (48 sq mi)
Elevation 110 m (360 ft)
Population (31 December 2008)[1]
 • Total 32,007
 • Density 260/km2 (660/sq mi)
Demonym Massafresi
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 74016
Dialing code 099
Website Official website

Massafra (Greek: Messaphros) is a town and comune in the province of Taranto in the Apulia region of southeast Italy.

History[edit]

According to some hypotheses,[2] Massafra was founded in the 5th century by refugees from the Roman province of Africa, invaded by the Vandals. The first historical mention of the city dates however from the 10th century, when it was a Lombard gastaldate.

After the Norman conquest of southern Italy, it was given to a nephew of Robert Guiscard, who fortified it and restored the castle. Later it was part of the Principality of Taranto, to which, as a free town, it belonged until 1463. In 1484 it was assigned to Antonio Piscitello. In 1497 it was sacked by the troops of Charles VIII of France, and the fief went to Artusio Pappacoda, whose family held it for a century and a half. They were succeeded by the Carmignano and the Imperiale.

Main sights[edit]

  • Numerous rock settlements, from the Neolithic to the High Middle Ages
  • Castle of Massafra, known from 970.
  • Mother Church (16th century)
  • Natural reserves of Monte Sant'Elia and Stornara

References[edit]

  1. ^ All demographics and other statistics: Italian statistical institute Istat.
  2. ^ Giuseppe Blandamura, Choerades Insulae, Taranto, Tipografia Arcivescovile, 1925.

External links[edit]