Matagami

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Matagami
City
View of Matagami
View of Matagami
Matagami is located in Quebec
Matagami
Matagami
Coordinates (195, boulevard Matagami[1]): 49°45′N 77°38′W / 49.750°N 77.633°W / 49.750; -77.633Coordinates: 49°45′N 77°38′W / 49.750°N 77.633°W / 49.750; -77.633[2]
Country  Canada
Province  Quebec
Region Nord-du-Québec
RCM None
Constituted April 1, 1963
Government[1]
 • Mayor René Dubé
 • Federal riding Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou
 • Prov. riding Ungava
Area[1][3]
 • Total 65.10 km2 (25.14 sq mi)
 • Land 66.85 km2 (25.81 sq mi)
  There is an apparent contradiction between two authoritative sources
Population (2011)[3]
 • Total 1,526
 • Density 22.8/km2 (59/sq mi)
 • Change (2006–11) Decrease1.9%
 • Dwellings 719
Time zone EST (UTC−5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC−4)
Postal code(s) J0Y 2A0
Area code(s) 819
Website www.matagami.com

Matagami (/mətɑːɡəmi/, French pronunciation: ​[mataɡami]) is a small town in Quebec, Canada. It is located north of Amos, on Matagami Lake, at the northern terminus of Route 109 and the start of the James Bay Road (French: Route de la Baie James). The town had a population of 1,526 as of the Canada 2011 Census.

History[edit]

MatagamiLake.jpg

Matagami was founded in 1963 with the development of mining in the area. Previously, it existed only as a very small prospecting camp accessible only by float plane, but after a viable mineral deposit was found in the late 1950s a permanent settlement began to be established. In 1962, the Quebec Toponomy Commission attempted to name the new community Mazenod after Charles-Joseph-Eugène de Mazenod, the founder of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate, but after a public outcry by local residents the community was named after Matagami Lake.

The name Matagami means "the confluence of waters" in the Cree language.[4]

The first church service in Matagami was held on 17 April 1962.

Demographics[edit]

Population trend:[5]

  • Population in 2011: 1526 (2006 to 2011 population change: -1.9 %)
  • Population in 2006: 1555
  • Population in 2001: 1939
    • 2001 to 2006 population change: -19.8 %
  • Population in 1996: 2243
  • Population in 1991: 2467

Private dwellings occupied by usual residents: 625 (total dwellings: 719)

Mother tongue:

  • English as first language: 1%
  • French as first language: 98%
  • English and French as first language: 0%
  • Other as first language: 1%

Economy[edit]

The two primary employers in the city are Xstrata and Domtar. Domtar has been in Matagami since 1988 when the company bought out Bisson & Bisson.[6]

Xstrata entered Matagami in 2006 when it acquired Falconbridge Ltd. In 2008, Xstrata put Perseverance, a zinc-copper volcanogenic massive sulfide ore deposit, into production. Perseverance has a mine life of 5.5 years.[7] Since 1957 ten deposits, including the world class Matagami Lake deposit (25.6 million tonnes grading 8.2% Zn, 0.56% Cu, 20.91 g/t Ag, 0.41 g/t Au), have been discovered and mined out for a total of "44.4 million tonnes with a similar average grade."[8]

Further exploration is continuing in the camp through a 50-50 joint venture agreement between Xstrata and Donner Metals.[9] In late 2008, Donner Metals Ltd. announced that Xstrata Zinc Canada was in the process of completing a scoping study at their jointly owned Bracemac-McLeod property.[10] It is the nearest city to the Lac Doré Vanadium Deposit.[11]

The community is also one of the distribution points for goods and services to the James Bay Hydroelectric Project. As well, Matagami has a small tourism industry due to the popularity of fishing and hunting in northern Quebec. Hotel Bell and Hotel Matagami include full service bars.

Climate[edit]

Geography[edit]

Nearby lakes include Lake Olga.

Media[edit]

Matagami is served by a community radio station, CHEF-FM, as well as by a rebroadcaster of Première Chaîne's CHLM-FM.

Notable people[edit]

Matagami is the birthplace of Canadian swimmer Marianne Limpert, who won the silver medal in the 200m Individual Medley at the 1996 Summer Olympics.

References[edit]

External links[edit]