Maternal mortality in fiction

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Maternal death in fiction is a common theme encountered in literature, movies, and other media.

The death of a mother during pregnancy, childbirth or puerperium is a tragic event. The chances of a surviving child to survive are compromised.[1] In fictional literature the death of a pregnant or delivering mother is a powerful device: it removes one character and places the surviving child into an often hostile environment which has to be overcome. While characters in literature differ, of course, a theme can often be discerned that shows that despite the death of the mother, the offspring will continue her mission.

Literature[edit]

Pre-19th century[edit]

19th century[edit]

  • In the Grimm Brothers' Snow White, Snow White's mother died in childbirth. Soon afterwards, her father took a new wife who was beautiful, but very vain, and who possessed supernatural powers.
  • In Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace, Liza Bolkonskaya, wife of Prince Andrei dies giving birth to a son called Nikolai.
  • In Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist the title character's mother, Agnes, dies giving birth to him.
  • Another Dickens novel A Christmas Carol, Scrooge's younger sister Fan dies in childbirth giving birth to his nephew Fred. Scrooge's father blames him for his mother also dying in childbirth.
  • In the 1891 play Spring Awakening by Franz Wedekind and the same-named contemporary musical Wendla dies from a botched abortion.
  • In Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, the author ridicules the convention of heroines having mothers who die in childbirth, by beginning the novel: "No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy would have supposed her born to be an heroine. Her situation in life, the character of her father and mother... were all equally against her... Her mother was a woman of useful plain sense, with a good temper, and, what is more remarkable, with a good constitution. She had three sons before Catherine was born; and instead of dying in bringing the latter into the world, as anybody might expect, she still lived on."
  • In Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, Catherine Earnshaw goes into early labor and dies after giving birth to her daughter, Catherine Linton.
  • In Elizabeth Gaskell's Mary Barton, when the heroine is a young girl, her mother dies in childbirth along with the baby, deeply affected by the grief of her sister Esther's disappearance, leaving Mary to be brought up by her father.
  • Fanny Robin in Thomas Hardy's Far From the Madding Crowd also dies in childbirth along with the child, who was fathered by Frank Troy, Bathsheba's husband.
  • In Henry James' Washington Square, Catherine Sloper's mother dies shortly after her birth and the death of his beautiful and talented wife permanently alters Dr Sloper and causes him to be cold and unfeeling towards Catherine.
  • Lucetta Farfrae (formerly Lucette Le Sueur) in Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge has a miscarriage and dies, following a seizure induced by the public revelation of her love affair with Michael Henchard.

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

  • In the final book of Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events book series, the character Kit Snicket dies after giving birth to her daughter (the father of whom is never revealed).
  • In the 2003 novel The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini, the mother of the protagonist Amir dies during his birth.
  • In the Nicholas Sparks novel At First Sight the female protagonist Lexie Darnell dies giving birth to daughter, Claire.
  • In R.A. Salvatore's novel The Highwayman, Sen Wi, realizing that her newborn son will die, uses a healing art to save him at the cost of her own life.
  • In George R. R. Martin's series A Song of Ice and Fire, the mother of Tyrion Lannister dies giving birth to him. He is considered responsible for her death by his father and sister throughout his life. In this series, there is also Daenerys Targaryen, whose mother died during her birth.

Film[edit]

20th century[edit]

  • In Satyajit Ray's 1959 Bengali film, Apur Sansar (The World of Apu), Apu's wife Aparna dies during childbirth, after which Apu falls into despair and abandons their child Kajal. Years later, Apu eventually acknowledges Kajal as his son and takes responsibility for his upbringing. It is based on the 1932 Bengali novel Aparajito.
  • In the 1998 motion picture The Mask of Zorro, the antagonist Don Rafael Montero, enemy of Don Diego de la Vega, lied that Esperanza de la Vega died in childbirth, but Esperanza de la Vega was actually gunned down instead. Then Montero raised her daughter Elena.
  • In the 1997 motion picture Contact, a woman died giving birth to the film's protagonist Eleanor Ann "Ellie" Arroway, portrayed by actress Jodie Foster. Arroway's father died when she was nine years old.
  • In Mi Familia/My Familia, the wife of the character played by Jimmy Smits dies while giving birth to their son.
  • In the Canadian movie The Red Violin, Anna Bussotti dies after a stillbirth in the opening act, leading to the creation of the Red Violin as a tribute.
  • In the motion picture Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein's mother dies giving birth to his little brother, William. She dies of illness in the original novel.
  • In the 1988 film The Seventh Sign, Demi Moore's character dies as a result of giving birth to her child. Actually, she offers her soul because "she finds out that the prophecies lead up to the birth of her child who may not survive because there will be no more souls left for the newborns unless someone offers their own."
  • In the film adaptation of Interview With the Vampire, Louis' wife dies in childbirth.
  • In the film My Girl Vada's mother died a few days after giving birth to her.
  • In the 1996 film The Craft, Sarah's mother died while giving birth to her.

21st century[edit]

Other media[edit]

Anime, comics, and video games[edit]

  • In the 1980s manga and anime series Kimagure Orange Road, Kyosuke's mother Akemi died shortly after giving birth to his twin sisters Manami and Kurumi.
  • Square Enix's Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy series of video games have mentioned maternal death in several games:
  • In SNK's King of Fighters video game series, the Yagami bloodline is cursed with maternal death. The mothers of the Yagami clan heirs are cursed to die giving birth to the clan heirs.
  • In the 1997 manga series Mobile Suit Gundam Wing: Episode Zero, Quatre Raberba Winner's mother Quatrina died giving birth to him.
  • In manga and anime series Naruto, Gaara's mother Karura dies giving birth to him.
  • In the 1998 video game Metal Gear Solid, Psycho Mantis's mother died in childbirth, prompting his father to blame him for her death.
  • In Key's 2004 visual novel Clannad, Nagisa dies giving birth to Ushio, after which the father Tomoya falls into depression and gives his daughter away to Nagisa's parents. Five years later, Tomoya eventually takes responsibility for Ushio's upbringing. It was later adapted into a film and anime series.
  • In the video game Jade Empire, Sky's wife dies giving birth to their daughter, Pinmei, years before he meets the player.
  • In the webcomic, Kevin and Kell, Wanda Woolstone dies giving birth to Corrie Dewclaw. Her death causes the otherwise very skilled Ralph Dewclaw, Corrie's father, to lose the will to hunt, and causes him to mistakenly believe that predator-prey relationships inevitably end tragically.
  • In the game Fallout 3, the player's mother dies when giving birth to him/her.
  • In this anime Kiddy Girl-and, Eclipse was Q-Feuille's mother, who died giving birth to her.

Live-action television[edit]

  • In the Australian television series Neighbours, the mother of characters Paul, Scott, Julie and Lucy Robinson died giving birth to youngest child, Lucy.
  • In an episode of House, a woman 26 weeks pregnant dies after doctors perform an emergency c-section.
  • In the television series Lost, the character Ben Linus's mother died while giving birth to him and his father blames him for it.
  • In the series one ER episode "Loves Labours Lost", Mark Greene oversees a patient who dies in childbirth due to pre-eclampsia. Mark is subsequently sued for negligence by her partner.
  • In the soap opera spin-off General Hospital: Night Shift, HIV-positive pregnant woman Stacey Sloan dies after complications of placental abruption.
  • In Gossip Girl, the anti-hero Chuck Bass's mother allegedly died after giving birth to him.
  • In Mad Men, the protagonist Don Draper's mother died while giving birth to him.
  • In Downton Abbey, Lady Sybil Branson dies from eclampsia after giving birth to her daughter Sybil.

Cartoons[edit]

  • In Rugrats, Melinda Finster may have died giving birth to her son Chuckie Finster. She is said to have died from a disease, though the disease is unknown.
  • In Winx Club, Musa's mother Matlin died of an illness, possibly caused by giving birth to her daughter, her illness is unknown, but her death had a severe impact on her family. her husband, Ho-Boe quited doing music and even resented music from existing, while Musa had been grieving all the way into adolescence.
  • In the recently aired cartoon Steven Universe, Steven's mother Rose Quartz may have died giving birth to him, as her husband Greg universe, Steven's father, said she "gave up her physical form to bring Steven into the world". Possibly meaning she died in childbirth.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Uhler SA (November 13, 2003). "Impact of a mother’s death on child health and survival in Haiti". Retrieved August 27, 2007. 

See also[edit]