Matti Shemoelof

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Matti Shemoelof (Hebrew: מתי שמואלוף‎, born July 11, 1972), Israeli poet, editor, journalist and activist.

Biography[edit]

Shemoelof was born and raised in Haifa, Israel. He now lives in Berlin. He taught at Kedma High School in Jerusalem. He also taught creative writing at Ron Vardi Center for Gifted Children,[1] and was a lecturer of Israeli culture at Minshar College in Tel Aviv.[2] Shemoelof received his BA from the Department of Theater at Tel Aviv University and an MA in History from the University of Haifa. His MA thesis was entitled, "The cultural and mythical meanings of the appearance of the character of Malcolm X in Spike Lee movie (1992)".[3] For this work, he received the Dean’s Prize of Excellence.[4]

He was pursuing a PhD in Literature at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and currently he is on a two-year break, which he took in order to focus on his writing.[5] His dissertation topic is “A Monograph of Yakov Rabinovitch as a Cultural Critic (1910–1948)”.[6] He is a fellow at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute,[7] a Jerusalem-based think tank that addressing issues of identity and class. Shemoelof participated in a workshop for promising PhD students, and also in Kedmata forum at the Ben Zvi Institute in Jerusalem.[8]

Literary work[edit]

Shemoelof writing is diverse and includes poetry, plays, and prose. His works have won significant recognition and prizes, including “Best debut poetry book of the year” (national art trust of the national lottery 2001); Selected appearance of “What has become of the independence day” play in the Small-Bama festival of the University of Tel Aviv; Best poetry book of the year (Haifa Cultural Foundation 2006); Honorable mention at “Haaretz” Annual short story contest (2011);[9] Winner of the Acum prize for advocating literature in Israel (2013) and more.

Shemoelof has published Five poetry books, "The Scar Minimizer" (2001)[10] and "Poetry Between Hazaz and Shemoelof" (2006)[11] "Why Don’t I write Israeli Love Songs" (2010).[12] His fourth book "Appetite for Hunger" (2013)[13]

His fifth poetry book "Last tango in Berlin" (2014)[14]

His writing is diverse and includes poetry, plays, and prose. His works have won significant recognition and prizes, including “Best debut poetry book of the year” (national art trust of the national lottery 2001); Selected appearance of “What has become of the independence day” play in the Small-Bama festival of the University of Tel Aviv; Best poetry book of the year (Haifa Cultural Foundation 2006); Honorable mention at “Haaretz” Annual short story contest (2011); Winner of the Acum prize for advocating literature in Israel (2013) and more.

His next book will be published by Kinneret Zmora-Bitan Dvir, the leading publishing company in Israel, where he recently signed a publishing contract for a short stories book to be edited by Prof. Yigal Schwartz.

His works have been translated to six languages, including a German translation done by the Literaturwerkstatt, which also invited him to Berlin to record my poets on audio (Lyrikline 2012), and a recent translation to Arab, which was published in leading literature papers.


In addition to having his poetry and articles published in a number of leading Hebrew-language magazines and journals. He co-edited two poetry anthologies, Adoma (Red) (2007)[15] and Tehudot Zehut (Echoing Identities) (2007)[16] La-Tzet! [To Get Out]! (2009)[17] Al Tagido BaGat (The influence of the Palestinian Nacba on the Hebrew Poetry) (2010).[18] From 2006 – 2008, he was an editor at the literary journal, HaCivon Mizrah (Eastward) and more.

He publish regularly on Israel's leading media channels, including: Israel HaYom (Israel Today) (Israel’s most popular daily newspaper), were he contribute a weekly opinion column and literature reviews. He publish a weekly column on Mako as well (The Internet news site of Keshet – Israel’s the most popular TV channel).[19] Previously, He published on Ynet, Israel’s leading news website.[20] (Israel’s most popular news site), NRG -(Israel’s #3 news site) Ma’ariv.,[21] and Walla (Israel’s most popular portal). He also took part in many TV appearances, including guest and panel member on Popolitika (public channel TV); Owls (culture channel TV); Channel 10 News, and others.

He wrote an autobiographic story titled “The Icebergs of the Memory”, which was included in the anthology “Echoing Identities”, published by Am Oved Publisher House in 2007.

Mati Shemoelof co-edited La-Tzet [To Get Out]! an anthology of works against the war in Gaza, which was the result of the cooperation of a number of literary projects, Cultural Guerilla among them. The anthology of art and poetry came out on the third day of the war and sold an edition within one month. La-Tzet! Can be seen as a continuation of the spirit of unification and revolt in front of the political situation through cultural cooperation seen in projects such as Red: An Anthology of Class Poetry (2007) that has sold three editions. La-Tzet was translated into Arabic and published both in English. His poems were translated in few English journals: Zeek,[22]Arspolitica,[23] Fusion,[24] Egypt,.[25] His poems have been translated to different languages:Lebanon,[26] Japan.[27] Italia.[28] and Germany.[29]

With the election of U.S. president Barack Obama, Shemoelof was part of the publication of the Manifesto, which called “New Spirit: An open letter from Israeli Descendants of the Countries of Islam”: “We, the Israeli sons and daughters of parents originating in the Islamic and Arab countries, show our support of the new spirit exemplified by President Obama in his speech in Cairo – a spirit of pacification, sensible vision, and the pursuit of justice and respect. Respect to the different religions, cultures, and humans.”[30]

Activism[edit]

Shemoelof take part in social activities: He was a founding member of the Haifa branch of the political info-shop, Salon Mazal.[31]

He volunteered in Keshet, The Democratic Rainbow Organization,[32] as a researcher and spokesman for five years.

He co-founded the multi-ethnical annual workshops in Tel Aviv for Ashkenazi and Mizrahi cultural movements at Beit Livik[33] House for Yiddish writers;[34] he contributed critical texts to several plastic art shows at the Museum of Tel Aviv for Arts,[35] Bezalel Academy of Arts [36]

Between 2006–2008, Shemoelof has been part of MiMizrach Shemesh, an organization devoted to the Jewish tradition of social responsibility.

He is the co-founder of the Israel Poets Union, poets union.[37] He wrote different articles regarding on poets rights [38] He is also the co-founder of Guerrilla Tarbut, an Israeli movement which propagates poetry as an accessible art form, and promotes political causes by means of art performed in public. Although the usually exclusive nature of poetry and poetry reading, this movement has achieved significant success in high-profile cases regarding contemporary economical and social events, reaching front headlines in Israel, and a few mentions abroad (including one at the New York times [39] ).

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ צוות ההדרכה תשע"ג. Roncenter.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  2. ^ http://www.minshar.org.il/לימודי_תיאוריה/10/סגל_מרצים/61
  3. ^ Pds Sso. Aleph.haifa.ac.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  4. ^ [1][dead link]
  5. ^ (Hebrew) http://isefresearch.wiki.huji.ac.il/index.php/%D7%9E%D7%97%D7%96%D7%95%D7%A8_%D7%AA%D7%A9%D7%A1%D7%97
  6. ^ Cherrick Center. Cherrick.huji.ac.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  7. ^ http://www.haaretz.co.il/hasite/pages/ShArtPE.jhtml?itemNo=1005021&contrassID=2&subContrassID=6&sbSubContrassID=0
  8. ^ פרוייקטים. Ybz.org.il (2013-03-24). Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  9. ^ Haaretz. Haaretz.co.il. Retrieved on 2011-06-27.
  10. ^ מגמד הצלקות – מתי שמואלוף. Simania.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  11. ^ שירה בין חזז ובין שמואלוף – מתי-שמואלוף. Text.org.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  12. ^ למה אני לא כותב שירי אהבה ישראליים – מתי שמואלוף. Text.org.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  13. ^ האסון מתחיל בארוחת עסקים – מתי שמואלוף. Simania.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  14. ^ פרידה בברלין – מתי שמואלוף. Simania.co.il. Retrieved on 2014-07-24.
  15. ^ ETGAR. Etgar.info. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  16. ^ תהודות זהות. Am-oved.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  17. ^ http://www.etgar.info/he/print/article__311/לצאת!
  18. ^ המבוקש מס' 2. Notes.co.il (2009-12-29). Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  19. ^ מתי שמואלוף – טור אישי. Mako.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  20. ^ http://www.ynet.co.il/home/1,7340,L-3340,00.html?txtSearchString=שמואלוף&collarity_appid=ynet_articles&collarity_channel=&collarity_origin=8
  21. ^ מעריב nrg. Nrg.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  22. ^ http://shemoelof.wordpress.com/2013/03/25/in-an-entire-ruined-village-and-at-the-jaffa-expulsion/
  23. ^ http://artpolitica.com/dictatorship-spot-mati-shemoelof/
  24. ^ http://shemoelof.wordpress.com/2011/04/30/why-dont-i-write-israeli-love-songs/#more-285
  25. ^ מחאה ישראלית במצרים? – וואלה! תרבות. E.walla.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  26. ^ The Leading ALG HAO on Site on the Net. alghaoon.com. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  27. ^ ディモナから、涙の半分 « המבוקש מס' 2. Matityaho.com. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  28. ^ [2] Italian festival of La Poesia Come
  29. ^ Verlagshaus J. Frank: Quartheft 17 | Märchenland. Die Gebrüder Grimm in Israel | Scheinberger, Frank, Ziller (Hg.). Belletristik-berlin.de. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  30. ^ A New Spirit. Arab-jew.blogspot.com (2009-06-13). Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  31. ^ [3]
  32. ^ הקשת הדמוקרטית המזרחית. Ha-keshet.org.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  33. ^ אגודת סופרי ועיתונאי יידיש בישראל – Text on Homepage. leyvik.org.il (2013-01-29). Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  34. ^ ynet קוראים לי אורי ואני אשכנזי – יהדות. Ynet.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  35. ^ Alienated Past and Alienated Present: On the Engagement with Nightmarish Light retrieved 8.4.2013
  36. ^ Bezalel // Issue No. 4 - The Ides of April, Spring 2007 The Violence in the Constitution of the Origin Mati Shemoelof retrieved 8.4.2013
  37. ^ http://poetry4rights.wordpress.com//
  38. ^ Where would we be without poetry?. Israel Hayom. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  39. ^ A Test of Wills Over a Patch of Desert: "And on Saturday, Jewish and Arab poets from around Israel gathered for a joint reading in Al Araqib in solidarity with the villagers’ battle against the authorities." 25.8.2010 RETRIEVED: 8.4.2012
  40. ^ a b נהר הוצאת ספרים. Nahar.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  41. ^ תהודות זהות. Am-oved.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  42. ^ Tell it Not in Gath: The Palestinian Nakba in Hebrew Poetry, 1948–1958. Zochrot.org. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  43. ^ http://matityaho.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/we_will_not_leave.pdf
  44. ^ לרוחב مقطع عرضي. Gerila.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  45. ^ עבודת גילוי. אסופה של שירה, סיפורת ואמנות. גרילה תרבות. Gerila.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  46. ^ The Levant Notebook. Eastofmediterranean.com. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  47. ^ Israeli Sociology – A Journal for the Study of Society in Israel. Socis.tau.ac.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  48. ^ Bezalel – Proceedings of History and Theory – הפרוטוקולים של היסטוריה ותיאוריה – Issue No.: 27 (03/2013). Bezalel.secured.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.
  49. ^ a b Bezalel – Proceedings of History and Theory – הפרוטוקולים של היסטוריה ותיאוריה – גיליון מספר: 7 (01/2008). Bezalel.secured.co.il. Retrieved on 2013-03-30.

External links[edit]