Maud Newton

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Maud Newton
Born Dallas, Texas
Education University of Florida
Occupation Writer and Critic

Rebecca "Maud" Newton[1] is a writer, critic, and former lawyer born in Dallas, Texas and raised in Miami, Florida.[2] Newton was raised in a Charismatic household[3] and attended college and law school at the University of Florida and currently resides in Brooklyn.[4][5][6]

She was awarded the 2009 Narrative Prize for "When the Flock Changed," an excerpt from her novel-in-progress.[7] In 2009 she also wrote an essay for The Los Angeles Times about her decision to write a novel instead of a memoir.[8] Her writing has been published in venues such as the New York Times Magazine, Bookforum, Narrative, the New York Times Book Review, the Awl, Tin House, Granta, the Los Angeles Times, Oxford American, Swink, and Barnes & Noble Review.[9] [10]

In 2004 she received the Irwin and Alice Stark Short Fiction Award from the City College of New York and in June 2008 she won second prize in the Narrative Magazine Love Story Contest.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Site Read: We chat with the founders of three of our favorite websites". Entertainment Weekly. 2006-06-15. Retrieved 2008-04-15. 
  2. ^ "A Talk With Maud Newton". Yahoo Picks!. 2007-10-12. Retrieved 2008-04-15. 
  3. ^ "Oy Vey, Christian Soldiers". The New York Times. 2013-03-22. Retrieved 2014-02-11. 
  4. ^ Newton, Maud (2010-03-22). "Sarah Palin's Planet Earth and the End Times". The Awl. 
  5. ^ Newton, Maud (2009-07-14). "Doubt". Bookforum. 
  6. ^ Newton, Maud (2008-03-16). "Hustle and merlot". BostonGlobe. 
  7. ^ "When the Flock Changed". Narrative Magazine. Retrieved 2011-03-04. 
  8. ^ "Off the Shelf: Maud Newton's life - a novel, not a memoir". Los Angeles Times. 2009-11-22. [dead link]
  9. ^ "http://maudnewton.com/writing/". 2014-02-11. 
  10. ^ "KIRKUS REVIEW LOVE IS A FOUR-LETTER WORD". 
  11. ^ "Maud Newton Writing". Retrieved 2008-04-15. 

External links[edit]