Maurice Casey

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Maurice Casey (Sunderland, 1942-May 10, 2014) was a British scholar of New Testament and early Christianity. He was Emeritus Professor at the University of Nottingham, having served there as Professor of New Testament Languages and Literature at the Department of Theology.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

Casey's father was the Anglican vicar of Wheatley Hill, but after his death his mother moved to Chevington and Casey to boarding school at Walsingham. He entered Durham University having intended to become an Anglican Minister, but changed his views in 1962 while completing his undergraduate degree in theology. Casey stated that he had not held any religious beliefs since.[3]

Fields of study[edit]

Aramaic sources behind the New Testament[edit]

Casey's work argued strongly for Aramaic sources behind the New Testament documents, specifically for Q and the Gospel of Mark.[4][5]

Casey's Aramaic ideas were challenged by Stanley E. Porter in Excursus: A response to Maurice Casey on the Languages of Jesus[6] citing modern scholarship,[7] that the linguistic environment of Roman Palestine was probably multilingual.

Son of Man[edit]

He also contributed works on early Christology and the use of the term Son of Man within the New Testament Gospels in reference to Jesus.

Publications[edit]

  • Son of Man : The Interpretation and Influence of Daniel 7. London: SPCK, 1979.
  • From Jewish Prophet to Gentile God : The Origins and Development of New Testament Christology. Cambridge, England. Westminster/J. Knox Press, 1991.
  • Aramaic Sources of Mark's Gospel, Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series. Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998, ISBN 1139425870, p.198.
  • An Aramaic Approach to Q : Sources for the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series. Cambridge, U.K. ; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002.
  • The Solution to The "Son of Man" Problem, Library of New Testament Studies 343. London ; New York: T & T Clark, 2007.
  • Casey, Maurice, and James G. Crossley. Judaism, Jewish Identities, and the Gospel Tradition : Essays in Honour of Maurice Casey, Bibleworld. London ; Oakville, CT: Equinox Pub., 2008.
  • Jesus of Nazareth: An Independent Historian's Account of His Life and Teaching. T&T Clark in London, New York, 2010.
  • Jesus: Evidence and Argument Or Mythicist Myths? 2014

References[edit]

  1. ^ Emeritus Professor, Faculty of Arts
  2. ^ Maurice Casey - Jesus: Evidence and Argument Or Mythicist Myths? 2014 - Page 37 "... many more details of my ordinary life here than I did in the original draft of this book. I was born in 1942, in the middle of an air raid in Sunderland. My father was the Anglican vicar of Wheatley Hill, a mining village some seven miles outside .."
  3. ^ Brian Bethune "Jesus historians get an earful from Maurice Casey" Maclean's, December 23, 2010
  4. ^ Maurice Casey An Aramaic Approach to Q: Sources for the Gospels of Matthew 2002 "Sources for the Gospels of Matthew and Luke Maurice Casey. ...wrote sound Hebrew as a living literary language. They also make it probable that some Jews spoke Hebrew."
  5. ^ Maurice Casey Aramaic Sources of Mark's Gospel 1998 - Page 61 "Hebrew found in the Evan Bohan, a fourteenth-century Jewish anti-Christian treatise by Shem-Tob "
  6. ^ Porter, Stanley E. (2004). Criteria For Authenticity In Historical-jesus Research. Continuum International Publishing Group. p. 164. ISBN 978-0-567-04360-3. Retrieved 16 May 2013. 
    "The linguistic environment of Roman Palestine during the first century was much more complex, and allows for the possibility that Jesus himself may well have spoken Greek on occasion." (p.164)
  7. ^ see also Stanley E. Porter, Jesus and the Use of Greek: A Response to Maurice Casey. Bulletin for Biblical Research. 10:1 (2000): 71-87.