Maurice Gee

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Maurice Gee (born 22 August 1931[1] in Whakatane, Bay of Plenty Region)[2] is a New Zealand novelist.[3]

Awards and honors[edit]

Gee was awarded the 1978 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel Plumb. He is an Honorary Associate of the New Zealand Association of Rationalists and Humanists.[4]

In 2002, Gee became the twelfth recipient of the Margaret Mahy Award.[5][6] In 2004, awarded the Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement.[7]

Early life and career[edit]

Gee was brought up in Henderson, a suburb of Auckland, a location that frequently features in his writing.[2][3] He completed BA and MA degrees at the University of Auckland, which subsequently recognised him with a Distinguished Alumni Award in 1998, and an honorary Doctor of Literature in 2004.[8] He is married and has three children, one of whom is also a writer.[9]

Works[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • The Big Season. London: Hutchinson, 1962. London: Arrow, 1964. Wellington: Allen & Unwin, 1985.[10]
  • A Special Flower. London: Hutchinson, 1965.
  • In My Father's Den. London: Faber, 1972. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1978.
  • A Glorious Morning, Comrade. Auckland: Auckland UP and Oxford UP, 1975.
  • Games of Choice. London: Faber, 1976. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1978.
  • Plumb. London: Faber, 1978. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1979.[10]
  • Under the Mountain. Wellington: Oxford UP, 1979.[10]
  • The World Around the Corner. Wellington: Oxford UP, 1980.
  • Meg. London: Faber, 1981. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1982. Auckland: Penguin.[10]
  • The Halfmen of O. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1982. Harmondsworth: Puffin, 1986.
  • Sole Survivor. London: Faber, 1983. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1983. Auckland: Penguin, 1983.[10]
  • The Priests of Ferris. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1984.
  • Motherstone. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1985.
  • The Fire-Raiser. Auckland: Puffin, 1986.
  • Collected Stories. Auckland: Penguin, 1986. New York: Penguin, 1987.
  • Prowlers. London and Boston: Faber, 1987.
  • The Champion. Auckland : Puffin, 1989; New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993.
  • The Burning Boy. London : Faber, 1990, 1992; Auckland : Viking, 1990.
  • Going West. Auckland : Viking, 1992; London: Faber, 1992; Auckland: Penguin, 2000.
  • Crime Story.Auckland : Penguin Books, 1994; Auckland: Viking, 1994; London: Faber, 1995.
  • The Fat Man. Auckland : Viking, 1995; Auckland: Puffin, 2000.
  • Plumb Trilogy. Auckland: Penguin, 1995.
  • Loving Ways. Auckland : Penguin, 1996.
  • Live Bodies. Auckland : Penguin, 1998; London: Faber, 1998; Scheuring: Black Ink, 2002 (German edition).
  • Orchard Street. Auckland : Viking, 1998.
  • Hostel Girl. Auckland : Puffin, 1999.
  • Ellie and the Shadow Man. Auckland: Penguin, 2001.
  • The Scournful Moon. Auckland: Penguin, 2003.
  • Blindsight. Auckland: Penguin, 2005
  • Salt. Auckland: Puffin, 2007
  • Gool. Auckland: Puffin, 2008
  • Access Road. Auckland: Penguin, 2009
  • The Limping Man. Auckland: Puffin, 2010

Short stories: first publication[edit]

  • In at the Death. Kiwi (1955): 21-26.
  • The Widow. Landfall 9 (1955): 196-213. In GMC, CS.[10]
  • Evening at Home. Arena 45 (1956): 23-24.
  • The Quarry. Arena 46 (1957): 6-10, 13.
  • A Sleeping Face. Landfall 11 (1957): 194-221. In GMC, CS.
  • A Girl in Blue. Mate 2 (1958): 10-19.
  • While the Flag was Up. Arena 50 (1958–59): 13-17, 28.
  • The Losers. Landfall 13 (1959): 120-47. In Landfall Country: Work from Landfall, 1947-1961. Christchurch: Caxton Press, 1962, 24-56. In New Zealand Short Stories, Second Series. Ed. C.K. Stead. London: Oxford UP, 1966, 255-95. In GMC, CS.
  • Facade. Mate. 4 (1960): 26-33.
  • Schooldays. Mate. December 1960: 2-11. In GMC, CS.
  • The Champion. Landfall 20 (1966): 113-25. In GMC, CS.
  • Down in the World. Landfall 21 (1967): 296-302. In GMC, CS.
  • A Retired Life. Landfall 23 (1969): 101-16. In GMC, CS.

Adaptations[edit]

Feature films
Television

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Who's who in New Zealand, 12. edition, Auckland 1991, p. 226
  2. ^ a b Maurice Gee bio for Arts Foundation of New Zealand. Retrieved 7 February 2007.
  3. ^ a b Maurice Gee bio for New Zealand Book Council. Retrieved 7 February 2007.
  4. ^ NZARH Honorary Associates, New Zealand Association of Rationalists and Humanists. Retrieved 7 February 2007.
  5. ^ "Margaret Mahy Medal Award". Christchurch, New Zealand: Christchurch City Libraries. 2012. Retrieved 25 July 2012. 
  6. ^ "Margaret Mahy Award". Storylines.org.nz. Auckland, New Zealand: Storylines Children's Literature Charitable Trust of New Zealand. 2012. Retrieved 25 July 2012. 
  7. ^ "Previous winners". Creative New Zealand. Retrieved 24 October 2013. 
  8. ^ "Famous past students - Maurice Gee". University of Auckland. Retrieved 2009-01-07. [dead link]
  9. ^ http://www.amazon.com/Emily-Gee/e/B0034PPO7C
  10. ^ a b c d e f Maurice Gee bio listed by the Arts Foundation of New Zealand. Retrieved 23 July 2007

References[edit]

  • The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature, edited by Roger Robinson and Nelson Wattie (1998).

External links[edit]