Maurice Harland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Rt Revd
Maurice Harland
Bishop of Durham
Diocese Diocese of Durham
In office 1956–1966 (retired)
Predecessor Michael Ramsey
Successor Ian Ramsey
Other posts Bishop suffragan of Croydon (1942–1947)
Archdeacon of Croydon (1946–1947)
Bishop of Lincoln (11 July 1947 {confirmed}–7 July 1956 {translated})
Personal details
Born (1896-04-17)17 April 1896
Died 29 September 1986(1986-09-29) (aged 90)
Nationality British
Denomination Anglican
Parents William & Elizabeth Harland
Spouse Agnes Harland MBE (née Winckley)
Children two daughters
Profession airman
Education St Peter's School, York
Alma mater Exeter College, Oxford
Leeds Clergy School

Maurice Henry Harland (17 April 1896–29 September 1986) was a 20th-century Anglican bishop, his most significant appointment being Bishop of Durham from 1956 to 1966.[1]

Early life[edit]

He was born on 17 April 1896, the son of the Revd William George and Clara Elizabeth Harland and educated at St Peter's School, York.[2] He was commissioned into the West Yorkshire Regiment in 1914 and served in the Royal Field Artillery until 1916, when he joined the newly formed Royal Flying Corps,[a] rising to the rank of lieutenant by 1919.

Marries and begins ministry[edit]

On demobilisation he went to Exeter College, Oxford,[b] graduating BA in 1922, MA 1927.[c] After a period of study at Leeds Clergy School he became a curate at St Peter's Leicester, during which time he married Agnes Winckley.[d] They had two daughters.

Career progresses[edit]

After five years he was appointed successively priest in charge of St Anne's Conventional District,[3] Perpetual Curate[e] of St Matthew's Holbeck, Leeds, Vicar of St Mary's, Windermere and Rural Dean of Ambleside before his first posting as suffragan bishop of Croydon[5] in 1942.[6] In 1947 he was transferred to the See of Lincoln[7] where he served a further nine years, being appointed to the House of Lords in 1954. His final appointment was to the more senior Bishopric of Durham.[f]

Retirement[edit]

Harland resigned his see in 1966 and retired to West Wittering, living another 20 years before dying on 29 September 1986.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Afterwards the Royal Air Force. He was not the only future bishop to serve in this branch: see also William Anderson
  2. ^ Made Honorary Fellow in 1950
  3. ^ Unlike other universities this is essentially the same degree, a period of time and a small payment securing the higher degree
  4. ^ She was awarded the MBE in 1967
  5. ^ When a new parish was created from a larger rectoral or vicarious parish, the incumbent, or parish priest was styled a “perpetual curate".[4]
  6. ^ In which capacity he was awarded an honorary DD in 1956.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Times, Thursday, 19 July 1956; p. 6; Issue 53587; col A Introduced as Bishop of Durham
  2. ^ "Harland, Rt. Rev Maurice Henry". Who Was Who 1920–2014. Who's Who (April 2014 online ed.). A & C Black an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 17 September 2014. 
  3. ^ Leicester Churches
  4. ^ Faith, History and Practice of the Church of England, Eaton, W.A. (London,Hodder & Stoughton Ltd, 1954 rpnt 1972 p. 37, ISBN 0-340-00718-4
  5. ^ The Times, Monday, 27 July 1942; p. 6; Issue 49298; col C Appointed Bishop of Croydon
  6. ^ Crockford's clerical directory (Lambeth, Church House, 1982 ISBN 0-19-200010-1) & "Harland MH". Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing. Retrieved 17 September 2014.  (Subscription required)
  7. ^ The Times, Wednesday, 14 May 1947; p. 4; Issue 50760; col C Nominated as Bishop of Lincoln
Church of England titles
Preceded by
William Anderson
Bishop of Croydon
1942–1947
Succeeded by
Cuthbert Bardsley
Preceded by
Leslie Owen
Bishop of Lincoln
1947–1956
Succeeded by
Kenneth Riches
Preceded by
Michael Ramsey
Bishop of Durham
1956–1966
Succeeded by
Ian Ramsey