Maurice Paprin

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Maurice Paprin (August 26, 1920 - November 29, 2005) was a New York City real estate developer and social activist.

Biography[edit]

Born on August 26, 1920, Paprin graduated from Townsend Harris High School in 1936 and City College in 1941. He gained an MA in history from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and taught briefly at New York University, but pressures arising from McCarthyism eased him out of academia. He began to work for his father's restaurant business and became acquainted with Democratic party officials in Queens. In the 1960s, Paprin began building low-cost real estate in Queens and in several locations in Manhattan, including the Lower East Side. He also became involved in civil-rights and anti-Vietnam War activism. With Robert Boehm, he co-founded the Fund for New Priorities in America, which organized antiwar teach-ins and mobilized people to press for a ceasefire. He was a prominent supporter of liberal politicians such as Edward M. Kennedy, George McGovern, and, later, Dennis Kucinich.

Paprin remained a force on the New York real-estate and social-activist scene into the 2000s. In his later years, his foremost concerns were educating young people worldwide--he was a key backer of the organization iEARN--and campaigning for the release of Lori Berenson, an American woman held captive in Peru. He also supported the New School and the Council on Hemispheric Affairs.

Paprin's sister, Eugenia, married Ewart Guinier, the prominent civil-rights activist; Harvard University law professor Lani Guinier is Paprin's niece.

Paprin died in November 25, 2005 from a fall.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wolfgang Saxon (November 29, 2005). "Maurice S. Paprin, 85, Builder and Advocate for Liberal Causes, Is Dead". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 10, 2012. Retrieved December 12, 2013. Maurice Sanford Paprin, a retired New York builder and property owner with another life as a liberal social activist, died on Friday at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell hospital in Manhattan. He was 85 and lived on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The cause was an injury sustained in a fall, said a family spokesman, Harry Zlokower. ...