Muiris Ó Fithcheallaigh

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Muiris Ó Fithcheallaigh (aka Maurice O'Fihely, Mauritius de Portu (Hibernicus), Mauritius Hibernicus; c. 1460 – March 25, 1513) was an Irish Franciscan theologian and Archbishop of Tuam.

Life[edit]

He was, according to James Lynch, a native of Clonfert in Galway, but, according to James Ware and Anthony à Wood, a native of Baltimore, County Cork.

Part of his education was received at the University of Oxford, where he joined the Franciscans. Later he studied at the University of Padua, where he obtained the degree of Doctor of Divinity. After his ordination he was appointed professor of philosophy at Padua.

O'Fihely acted for some time as corrector of proofs to two well-known publishers at Venice, Scott and Locatelli—in the early days a task usually entrusted to very learned men and he was one of the first Irishmen to engage with the newly emerged technology of the printing press. O'Fihely was acknowledged one of the most learned men of his time, so learned that his contemporaries called him Flos Mundi (Flower of the World). In addition, his capacities were recognized at Rome, and in 1506 he was appointed Archbishop of Tuam. He was consecrated at Rome by Pope Julius II.

He did not return to Ireland till 1513, meantime attending as Archbishop of Tuam the first two sessions of the Fifth Lateran Council (1512). On leaving for Ireland to take formal possession of his see, he procured from the pope an indulgence for all those who would be present at his first Mass in Tuam. He was destined not to reach Tuam, for he fell ill in Galway, and died there in the Franciscan convent.

Works[edit]

He was a student of the works of Duns Scotus, and wrote a commentary on them (published at Venice about 1514).

References[edit]

Ó hAodha, Ruairí. 'Maurice O'Fihely: Printer, Publisher and Archbishop of Tuam', Journal of the Old Tuam Society, Vol. 7. Tuam, 2010

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company.