Max Hirschberg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Max Hirschberg (1883-1964) was a German Jewish Weimar era anti-Nazi criminal defense lawyer and scholar.

Hirschberg confronted in court directly Adolf Hitler; he was imprisoned, but released because of his conduct during World War I and allowed to practice law even after the 1933 Nazi election.

In 1934, he emigrated from Germany to Italy, and later to New York.

Hirschberg wrote mainly about miscarriages of justice.

He was also a friend of Philipp Löwenfeld.[1]

In recognition of Hirschberg's work on behalf of innocent persons wrongly convicted of crimes, in 2007 he was named as one of the inaugural members of the Wrongful Conviction Hall of Honor established by Justice Denied -- the magazine for the wrongly convicted. The article about Hirschberg was titled -- "Max Hirschberg: One Of The World's Great Wrongful Conviction Lawyers."

Bibliography[edit]

by himself[edit]

by others[edit]

  • "Max Hirschberg: One Of The World's Great Wrongful Conviction Lawyers," Justice Denied -- the magazine for the wrongly convicted, Issue 35, Winter 2007, pp. 27–28, 33.

References[edit]

  1. ^ ""