Maxie's World

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Maxie's World
Maxie'sWorldtitlecard.jpg
Developed by Phil Harnage
Directed by Marek Buchwald
(director)
Paul Quinn
(voice direction)
Composer(s) Haim Saban
Shuki Levy
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 32 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s) Andy Heyward
(executive producer)
Robby London
(co-executive producer)
Producer(s) Cassandra Schafhausen
(producer)
Running time 15 minutes (with commercials)
Production company(s) DIC Entertainment
Hasbro
Distributor Claster Television
Broadcast
Original channel Syndication
Original run September 14, 1987 – October 25, 1987
External links
Production website

Maxie's World is an American animated children's television program produced by DIC Entertainment. Distributed by Claster Television and originally airing in first-run syndication in the United States from September 14, 1987 through October 25, 1987, the series consists of one season, comprising a total of 32 episodes, each 15 minutes long.[1] After its original run, the series continued to be broadcast throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s as part of a syndication package featuring rebroadcasts of Beverly Hills Teens and It's Punky Brewster.[2][3]

Developed for television by Phil Harnage, and executive produced by Andy Heyward, the series was conceived as a tie-in to the Hasbro line of "Maxie" fashion dolls.[4] The titular character, Maxie, is a straight "A" student, cheerleader, and surfer girl, who attends Surfside High School in California. In addition to her life as a "typical" teenager, Maxie routinely finds adventure solving crimes and investigating mysteries as host of her own TV show.

Premise[edit]

The series takes place in the fictional seaside town of "Surfside" and follows the adventures of teenager Maxie and her circle of friends. Maxie attends Surfside High School where she is a popular straight "A" student, cheerleader and surfer girl, while after school, she serves as host and investigative reporter of her own eponymous talk show Maxie's World. Through her work as a journalist, Maxie routinely finds herself called upon to investigate mysteries and solve crimes, bringing the perpetrators to justice. Frequently accompanying Maxie in her adventures is her boyfriend, Rob, a handsome and popular football and soccer star at Surfside High.

Additional members of Maxie's circle of friends include Ashley, Carly and Simone, while male friends Mushroom and Ferdie routinely provide the series with its slapstick comedy elements. Providing much of the series' conflict is Jeri, who is envious of Maxie and is often shown manipulating events to humiliate the TV star in an attempt to sabotage her career and get her own TV show. In addition to the comedy and mystery elements, the series occasionally takes the opportunity to address more serious issues, including one episode which deals with the issue of teenage smoking, and another, which deals with the issue of eating disorders.[3]

Voice cast[edit]

Episodes[edit]

Title Written by Original air date
1 "Date Expectations" Judy Rothman September 14, 1987 (1987-09-14)
Maxie and the girls reminisce about Maxie's first date with Rob, which includes a series of comical misadventures, ultimately resulting in true romance.
2 "Ride for Your Life" Phil Harnage September 15, 1987 (1987-09-15)
Maxie and Rob begin to witness suspicious occurrences when a mysterious tall dark man attempts to sabotage the rides at the local amusement park.
3 "Wheelie Bad Dudes" Jack Olesker September 16, 1987 (1987-09-16)
4 "The Not-So Great Outdoors" David Ehrman
Sean Roche
September 17, 1987 (1987-09-17)
Maxie and the Surfside teens find outdoor adventure and healthy competition when they divide into teams of boys versus girls for a weekend camping trip.
5 "Goodbye Ghoul World" Phil Harnage September 18, 1987 (1987-09-18)
Maxie and the Surfside teens are called in to investigate a haunted cruise ship, the "S.S. Lady Luck" after passengers are frightened by visions of ghosts.
6 "This Rap's for You" September 19, 1987 (1987-09-19)
7 "To Be or Not To Be Ferdie" September 22, 1987 (1987-09-22)
8 "Misadventures in Babysitting" September 23, 1987 (1987-09-23)
Maxie and Simone find themselves unwittingly involved in a jewel heist after two bumbling thieves hide their ill-gotten loot in Maxie's nephew's diaper bag.
9 "Breaking Up is Hard to Do" September 24, 1987 (1987-09-24)
10 "Fat Chance" Phil Harnage September 25, 1987 (1987-09-25)
Maxie and the Surfside teens participate in a swimsuit fashion show, prompting Ashley to experience body dysmorphic disorder and go on a crash diet.
11 "The Maxie Horror Picture Show" Pat Allee
Ben Hurst
September 26, 1987 (1987-09-26)
Maxie and the Surfside teens begin experiencing unexplained phenomenon when they decide to produce a horror film inside an old abandoned mansion.
12 "The Phantom Artists" Anthony Adams
Christina Adams
September 27, 1987 (1987-09-27)
Maxie and the Surfside teens take matters into their own hands when the mysterious "Graffiti Squad" goes on a rampage vandalizing Surfside's landmarks.
13 "Two Guys for Every Girl" September 30, 1987 (1987-09-30)
14 "Ashes To Ashley" October 1, 1987 (1987-10-01)
Ashley decides to begin smoking cigarettes believing it will help her appear to be more sophistocated.
15 "A Day in the Life of Rob" Richard Glatzer October 2, 1987 (1987-10-02)
Rob begins exhibiting symptoms of stress and fatigue after over-committing himself to schoolwork, sports, and various other extra-curricular activities.
16 "Surfside Over the Rainbow" Jack Olesker October 3, 1987 (1987-10-03)
Maxie dreams of a faraway land where she finds sapphire sneakers, a dog named Tutu, the Wicked Witch of the Southwest, and the Wizard of Surf TV.
17 "Very Superstitious" October 4, 1987 (1987-10-04)
Maxie attempts to free Rob of his superstitions when the chef responsible for his "lucky pizza" moves away, causing Rob to become insecure and frightened.
18 "I Was a Teenage Council Member" October 5, 1987 (1987-10-05)
19 "Mushroom and Ferdie's Hysterical Historical Adventure" October 8, 1987 (1987-10-08)
Mushroom and Ferdie dream of encounters with a series of legendary historical figures during an all-night study session for their Women's Studies class.
20 "Pirouettes and Forward Passes" October 9, 1987 (1987-10-09)
21 "Friend or UFO?" David Molitor October 10, 1987 (1987-10-10)
Maxie and the Surfside teens begin to witness UFO sightings after Jeri devises a scheme to undermine Maxie's credibility and start her own TV show.
22 "Photo Opportunity" Jack Hanrahan
Eleanor Burian-Mohr
October 11, 1987 (1987-10-11)
Maxie and the Surfside teens reminisce about their previous school photos, in anticipation of taking their first class photo with the entire gang present.
23 "Do or Diary" October 12, 1987 (1987-10-12)
24 "Beach Blanket Battle" Jack Olesker October 13, 1987 (1987-10-13)
Maxie and the Surfside teens meet the Beverly Hills Teens who pay a visit to Surfside in order to compete in the "Beach Blanket Battle" charity challenge.
25 "Teaching an Old Teacher New Tricks" David Ehrman
Sean Roche
October 16, 1987 (1987-10-16)
Mr. Winchell, an elderly teacher at Surfside is told that he must retire at the end of the year after the principal decides his teaching methods are out of date.
26 "Hero Word-Ship" October 17, 1987 (1987-10-17)
27 "Dear Hunk" October 18, 1987 (1987-10-18)
28 "The Slumber Party" October 19, 1987 (1987-10-19)
Jeri's plan has unintended consequences when she throws a slumber party and attempts to recruit Mushroom and Ferdie to humiliate Maxie and her friends.
29 "A Dog's Tale" October 20, 1987 (1987-10-20)
30 "The Five Finger Discount" David Ehrman
Sean Roche
October 21, 1987 (1987-10-21)
31 "True Brit" October 24, 1987 (1987-10-24)
32 "Future Schlock" Judy Rothman October 25, 1987 (1987-10-25)
Maxie and the Surfside teens get their career aptitude test results, prompting Maxie to fantasize about an assortment of potentially suitable career paths.

Home media[edit]

Beginning in 1989, select episodes were released in the United States on 30-minute, 60-minute, and 120 minute NTSC VHS tapes by Celebrity Home Entertainment's Just for Kids Mini Features line.[5][6] Beginning in 1991, select episodes were released in the United Kingdom on 30-minute, 60-minute, and 90-minute PAL VHS tapes by Abbey Home Entertainment, rated  U  for "Universal" and deemed suitable for all ages.[7] The series was distributed by Claster Television, which was owned by Hasbro, the makers of the "Maxie" dolls. As a result, Hasbro must give approval before any future home video release of the series is made available.[citation needed]

Maxie toy line[edit]

The "Maxie" toy line was originally conceived by Hasbro in 1986 after second-year sales of its fashion doll Jem did not live up to the toy company's expectations. In March 1988, Maxie, an 11½-inch tall, blonde-haired, blue-eyed, "All-American" teenage fashion doll was introduced onto toy store shelves, and was described as a competitor to Mattel's Barbie doll. For the launch, Hasbro had reportedly spent an estimated 70% of its annual advertising budget ($7 million) marketing the new doll.

In addition to the television series tie-in, promotion consisted of live presentations and television advertisements which starred Brooke Theiss as the live model. Commercials would typically feature the Maxie doll at school or various other activities, then switch to Theiss as the "real life" Maxie, which Hasbro vice president of public relations and promotions, Wayne Charness, described at the time as "innovative advertising for a fashion doll". By October 1988, sales of Maxie were said to be strong, with Charness reporting, "She's right on target with our projections for the first year. We certainly look forward to Maxie to be around for a long time."

The Maxie doll was typically priced between $5.50–$13 (approximately $10–$25 in 2013 currency) which was considered a slightly more affordable price range than Mattel's Barbie, the #1 selling fashion doll at the time. In contrast to Barbie, who, by that time, had evolved into more "adult" careers and endeavors, Maxie was marketed as a decidedly teen-aged high school student and was available in several variations, including numerous beach-themed "Makin' Waves" and "Sun Splash" dolls, a "Cheerleader" doll, a "Slumber Party" doll, a "Ballerina" doll, a "Hula Hoop" doll, and a "Perfect Prom" doll.

Also available as part of the toy line was Maxie's boyfriend "Ron", and her best friends; blonde "Carly", redhead "Ashley", and African American "Kristen" (later renamed "Simone" in keeping with the television series). Accessories for Maxie included her horse Tiffany, a sailboat play set, a locker & shower play set, a Surf Watchin' lifeguard play set, and a hot tub & patio play set, as well as "Fancy Face" makeup for the doll and "Mix 'n Match" and "Cool 'n Classy" fashion lines. Additional merchandise included Maxie paper dolls, coloring books and lunch boxes.[8][9]

In 1989, Mattel answered Hasbro's Maxie with the introduction of Barbie's teenage cousin "Jazzie", her boyfriend "Dude", and friends "Chelsie" and "Stacie".[10] Similar to Mattel's introduction of Barbie and the Rockers which was credited, in part, for the demise of Jem and the Holograms,[11] the introduction of Jazzie was described as delivering the "coup de grâce" to Maxie and, in January 1990, Hasbro announced it was discontinuing the Maxie toy line.[10]

References[edit]

External links[edit]