Maxima Group

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Maxima Group
Type Private
Industry Retail, general merchandise
Founded Vilnius
Headquarters Vilnius, Lithuania
Area served Bulgaria, Estonia, Poland,
Latvia, Lithuania
Key people Mindaugas Bagdonavičius (CEO)
Products Groceries, consumer goods
Revenue 8,699 bil. LTL[1]
Employees 29,500
Parent Vilniaus prekyba
Subsidiaries UAB "Maxima LT", "Maxima Latvija" SIA, "Maxima Eesti" OÜ, "Maxima Bulgaria" EOOD, UAB "Ermitažas"
Website Official website
Maxima XXX store in Kaunas.
Maxima inside
Maxima X store in Vilnius.
Ermitažas store in Šiauliai.

"Maxima" is a retail chain operating in Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Poland and Bulgaria and it is the largest Lithuanian capital company and the largest employer in the Baltic States. "Maxima Group" has 508 stores (as of 2013) in Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and Bulgaria. Depending on the size of the "Maxima" stores, they offer 3,000 to 65,000 brands. The group employs more than 29,500 people. Its main headquarters is in Vilnius, Lithuania.

History[edit]

Three "Maxima" stores were opened in Vilnius in 1992, since then it has become the Baltics most successful supermarket chain. "Maxima" opened in Latvia in 2001, in Riga. Currently, "Maxima Latvija" SIA in Latvia holds approximately 24% retail market share. "Maxima" opened in Estonia in 2001, in the city of Pärnu. In 2007, first "Maxima XX" stores were opened in the country, and in 2008 the first "Maxima XXX" store was opened in Pärnu. Currently, the Company holds almost 14% market share with 54 "Maxima" shopping centres. At the end of 2011 Maxima Group bought the "Aldik" supermarket chain in Poland with 24 stores.[2] On 21 November 2013, the roof of a Maxima XX store in Riga collapsed, killing 54 people and seriously injuring many more. So far it is not known what caused the disaster, but the police are investigating three scenarios - first that there was an error in architectural design, and authorities overseeing planning had been negligent; secondly that cause is related to initial building procedure, and thirdly that it was caused by the current construction of the green roof.[3]

Store formats[edit]

"Maxima" stores operate under several names: "Maxima X", "Maxima XX", "Maxima XXX", "hyper Maxima", "Maxima B", "Ermitažas" and "T-Market". Each type of store is set up according to a defined standard, so that customers can orient themselves easily and find the necessary item. At the "Maxima" shopping centers with two and three Xs, part of the commercial space is rented to specialized stores, so that customers can have access to additional services and goods.

"Maxima X"(previously "Minima")- a store that’s close to home. People stop by every day to quickly purchase the goods they need most. Both in the city and the country, shoppers who stop by Maxima X stores will find goods arranged in the same way. In Bulgaria, stores of the same concept are operated under the "T-Market" brand.

"Maxima XX" (previously "Media")- built in the suburbs of the large cities, home to 12,000-30,000 residents. Stores of this size are for those who wish to shop quickly and need a wide product range.

"Maxima XXX" (previously "Maxima")- at these supermarkets, customers can find the widest assortment of goods. Shoppers are offered up to 50,000 different food products and manufactured goods. The store features a bakery, pastry making facilities, and kitchen facilities, so customers can purchase fresh food items prepared right at the store.

"Ermitažas" is a chain of home improvement and construction material stores in Lithuania. As of 2013, there are four Ermitažas stores: in Vilnius, Kaunas, Klaipėda and Šiauliai. Ermitažas revenue during 2011 was 176.5 mil. LTL.[4]

Statistics[edit]

 Bulgaria  Estonia  Latvia  Lithuania  Poland Total
Total number of stores 42 [5] 70 [6] 143 [7] 229 [8] 22 [9] 506
Number of employees (2012) 948 3,912 7,565 16,323 682 29,430
Customers per day 36 000 105 000 277 000 604 000 TBD 1 058 000
Turnover in LTL (without VAT) (2013) 217 mil. 1.318 bil. 2.278 bil. 4.778 bil. 107 mil. 8.699 bil.

Countries with Maxima branches[edit]

Maxima map.png
Maxima XX store in Riga.

Maxima Lietuva[edit]

The biggest part of Maxima Group. Maxima stores in Lithuania hold 70% of the total retail market. In 2011 GILD Bankers announced that Maxima Group was the most valuable company.[10]

Maxima Latvija[edit]

In 2009, "Maxima Latvija" was third in the Top List of Latvia’s Largest Companies (based on net turnover in 2009.) "Maxima Latvija" also had the highest revenue in the sector in 2009: 14.80 million lats. Also in 2009, "Maxima Latvija" was assessed as the eighth most-beloved brand in Latvia, and for two years in a row (2009 and 2010) the company earned the title of Latvia’s most beneficial brand. In 2010 "Maxima Latvija" placed sixth in the list of most beloved brands, and eighth in the list of most valuable companies. That same year, "Maxima Latvija" placed 31st in the list of top reputations, and 25th in the top list created by experts from various sectors.

On 21 November 2013 a roof collapsed at one of the Maxima stores, killing 54 and injuring dozens.

Maxima Eesti[edit]

In 2011 Maxima chain in Estonia grew by 13.3% and it was the best rate in all countries.

Maxima България[edit]

In 2011 Maxima chain in Bulgaria grew by 7.3%.

Aldik[edit]

Maxima Group operates in Poland under the name of Aldik.

Private labels[edit]

  • Maxima Favorit – expensive higher-quality products
  • Optima Linija – cheap low-quality products
  • Maxima Ecologica – a brand for organic products
  • Meistro Kokybė – a brand for fresh meat and fish products, as well as deli and confectionery products.
  • Meistara Marka – same as above but in Latvia.
  • DISNEY is Disney-labeled line of products for children.
  • Saulės pienas – a brand used in milk and milk products group.
  • Mano – a brand used in meat products group.
  • Ocean – a brand used in fish products group.
  • Collexion – a brand used for clothing and footwear for the family.
  • Strada – a brand for casual apparel and footwear designed for children.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]