Maximum Fighting Championship

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Maximum Fighting Championship
Type Private
Industry Mixed martial arts promotion
Founded 2001
Founder(s) Mark Pavelich
Headquarters Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Key people

Mark Pavelich (CEO)
Dave Pavelich (Vice-President)

Manon Pavelich (Treasurer/Tickets)[1]
Parent Pavelich Sports Inc.
Website http://www.maximumfighting.com

Maximum Fighting Championship is a Canadian mixed martial arts (MMA) promotion based in Edmonton, Alberta. The MFC’s former home, in Canada, is the River Cree Resort and Casino in Enoch, Alberta, located just outside of Edmonton, Alberta but has also held events at the Edmonton Expo Centre.[2] MFC events are broadcast on The Fight Network, AXS TV (formerly HDnet) in North America and most recently TSN2. The MFC is known to be the biggest MMA promotion in Canada and one of the top MMA shows in the World. MFC has notable Canadian fighters, such as Ryan Jimmo, Graham Spencer, Tom Watson and Douglas Lima, plus MMA veterans, such as Jason MacDonald, Thales Leites, Jay Silva, Trevor Prangley, and Paul Daley.[3]

History[edit]

Maximum Fighting Championship was founded on March 3, 2001, by Pavelich Sports Inc. Mark Pavelich is the CEO of MFC and runs the business day to day. Dave Pavelich is Vice President and Manon Pavelich is the booker.

MFC currently airs on AXStv and The Fight Network. The MFC’s former home was the River Cree Resort and Casino in Enoch, Alberta, Canada located just outside of Edmonton, Alberta. Their new home is the Mayfield Inn Trade and Conference Centre Edmonton, Alberta. In July 2011, the MFC signed a five Year live TV Deal with HDNet/AXStv and October 2011, MFC signed with TSN2.

The MFC hosts heavyweight fights but doesn't have a heavyweight championship due to the lack of heavyweights outside of the top promotions.

The MFC employs the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts. All MFC bouts take place in a ring, with the exception of MFC 29 which, in accordance with the regulations utilized in Ontario which requires all mixed martial arts fights to be held in a cage structure, took place in a circular cage named "The Ring" by the winner of a "Name the Cage" fan contest.[4]

In 2012, MFC re-launched its heavyweight division and the upcoming debut of its featherweight division, the Maximum Fighting Championship also announceed that the organization would add a bantamweight division in 2013. On May 19, 2013, MFC debuted its bantamweight division at MFC 37: True Grit.

Rules[edit]

The MFC employs the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts.

Rounds[edit]

Every round in MFC competition is five minutes in duration. Title matches have five such rounds, and non-title matches have three. There is a one-minute rest period between rounds.[5]

Weight divisions[edit]

The MFC currently uses six weight classes:[5]

Weight class name Upper limit
in pounds (lb) in kilograms (kg)
Bantamweight 135 61
Featherweight 145 66
Lightweight 155 70
Welterweight 170 77
Middleweight 185 84
Light Heavyweight 205 93
Heavyweight 265 120
Super Heavyweight No weight limit

Attire[edit]

All competitors must fight in approved shorts, without shoes. Shirts, gis or long pants (including gi pants) are not allowed. Fighters must use approved light-weight open-fingered gloves, that include at least 1" of padding around the knuckles, (110 to 170 g / 4 to 6 ounces) that allow fingers to grab. These gloves enable fighters to punch with less risk of an injured or broken hand, while retaining the ability to grab and grapple.

Match outcome[edit]

Matches usually end via:

  • Submission: a fighter clearly taps on the mat or his opponent or verbally submits.
  • Technical Submission: A technical submission is achieved when the referee stops a fight due to an injury resulting from a submission hold or due to a fighter going unconscious from a choke.
  • Knockout: a fighter falls from a legal blow and is either unconscious or unable to immediately continue.
  • Technical Knockout (TKO): If a fighter cannot continue, the fight is ended as a technical knockout. Technical knockouts can be classified into three categories:
    • referee stoppage: (the referee determines a fighter cannot "intelligently defend" himself; if warnings to the fighter to improve his position or defense go unanswered—generally, two warnings are given, about 5 seconds apart)
    • doctor stoppage (a ringside doctor due to injury or impending injury, as when blood flows into the eyes and blinds a fighter)
    • corner stoppage (a fighter's own corner-man signals defeat for their own fighter)
  • Judges' Decision: Depending on scoring, a match may end as:
    • unanimous decision (all three judges score a win for fighter A)
    • majority decision (two judges score a win for fighter A, one judge scores a draw)
    • split decision (two judges score a win for fighter A, one judge scores a win for fighter B)
    • unanimous draw (all three judges score a draw)
    • majority draw (two judges score a draw, one judge scoring a win)
    • split draw (one judge scores a win for fighter A, one judge scores a win for fighter B, and one judge scores a draw)[5]

Note: In the event of a draw, it is not necessary that the fighters' total points be equal. However, in a unanimous or split draw, each fighter does score an equal number of win judgments from the three judges (0 or 1, respectively).

A fight can also end in a technical decision, disqualification, forfeit, technical draw, or no contest. The latter two outcomes have no winners.

Judging criteria[edit]

The ten-point must system is in effect for all fights; three judges score each round and the winner of each receives ten points, the loser nine points or fewer. If the round is even, both fighters receive ten points.

Fouls[edit]

The Nevada State Athletic Commission currently lists the following as fouls:[5][6]

  1. Butting with the head
  2. Eye gouging of any kind
  3. Biting
  4. Hair pulling
  5. Fish hooking
  6. Groin attacks of any kind
  7. Putting a finger into any orifice or into any cut or laceration on an opponent. (see Gouging)
  8. Small joint manipulation
  9. Striking to the spine or the back of the head (see Rabbit punch)
  10. Striking downward using the point of the elbow (see Elbow (strike))
  11. Throat strikes of any kind, including, without limitation, grabbing the trachea
  12. Clawing, pinching or twisting the flesh
  13. Grabbing the clavicle
  14. Kicking the head of a grounded opponent
  15. Kneeing the head of a grounded opponent
  16. Stomping a grounded opponent
  17. Kicking to the kidney with the heel
  18. Spiking an opponent to the canvas on his head or neck. (see piledriver)
  19. Throwing an opponent out of the ring or fenced area
  20. Holding the shorts or gloves of an opponent
  21. Spitting at an opponent
  22. Engaging in unsportsmanlike conduct that causes an injury to an opponent
  23. Holding the ropes or the fence
  24. Using abusive language in the ring or fenced area
  25. Attacking an opponent on or during the break
  26. Attacking an opponent who is under the care of the referee
  27. Attacking an opponent after the bell (horn) has sounded the end of a round
  28. Flagrantly disregarding the instructions of the referee
  29. Timidity, including, without limitation, avoiding contact with an opponent, intentionally or consistently dropping the mouthpiece or faking an injury
  30. Interference by the corner
  31. Throwing in the towel during competition

When a foul is charged, the referee in their discretion may deduct one or more points as a penalty. If a foul incapacitates a fighter, then the match may end in a disqualification if the foul was intentional, or a no contest if unintentional. If a foul causes a fighter to be unable to continue later in the bout, it ends with a technical decision win to the injured fighter if the injured fighter is ahead on points, otherwise it is a technical draw.

Match conduct[edit]

  • After a verbal warning the referee can stop the fighters and stand them up if they reach a stalemate on the ground (where neither are in a dominant position or working towards one).
  • If the referee pauses the match, it is resumed with the fighters in their prior positions.
  • Grabbing the ring ropes brings a verbal warning, followed by an attempt by the referee to release the grab by pulling on the grabbing hand. If that attempt fails or if the fighter continues to hold the ropes, the referee may charge a foul.

Title fights[edit]

On September 18, 2012 the MFC instituted new regulations regarding title fights.[7]

Title Fight with a reigning/defending champion

  • If the champion fails to make weight:
    • SCENARIO 1 - The champion vacates the title immediately. The fight remains a five-round contest. If the vacated champion wins the fight, the Maximum Fighting Championship holds the option to automatically consider him the No. 1 contender for the next title fight in that weight class. The Maximum Fighting Championship also holds an option to make an immediate rematch.
    • SCENARIO 2 - The champion vacates the title immediately. The fight remains a five-round contest. If the challenger wins the fight, the challenger becomes the MFC champion. The Maximum Fighting Championship holds an option to make an immediate rematch.
  • If the challenger fails to make weight:
    • The champion automatically retains the belt. A non-title fight takes place and the Maximum Fighting Championship solely determines if the bout is a three- or five-round fight. If the challenger wins the bout, the Maximum Fighting Championship holds an option to make a future rematch.
  • If both fighters fail to make weight:
    • The champion vacates the title immediately. A non-title fight takes place and the Maximum Fighting Championship solely determines if the bout is a three- or five-round fight. The Maximum Fighting Championship holds the option to consider the winner of the bout as the No. 1 contender for the next title fight in that weight class. The Maximum Fighting Championship also holds an option to make future rematch.

Title Fight with a vacant championship

  • If one fighter fails to make weight:
    • The fight remains a five-round contest. If the fighter who made weight wins the bout, he becomes the MFC champion of that weight class. If the fighter who failed to make weight wins the bout, that fighter does not claim the title, and the Maximum Fighting Championship holds the option to make him the No. 1 contender and/or to make an immediate rematch.
  • If both fighters fail to make weight:
    • A non-title bout takes place and the Maximum Fighting Championship solely determines if the bout is a three- or five-round fight. The Maximum Fighting Championship holds the option to make a future rematch.

Events[edit]

Main article: List of MFC events

As of October 26, 2012, the Maximum Fighting Championship has held a total of 38 events, all of which have take place in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada with the exception of MFC 29 which took place in Windsor, Ontario, Canada.

Current champions[edit]

Division Upper weight limit Champion Since Title Defenses Next fight
Heavyweight 265 lb (120 kg; 18.9 st) Anthony Hamilton October 4, 2013 1
Light Heavyweight 205 lb (93 kg; 14.6 st) Vacant N/A
Middleweight 185 lb (84 kg; 13.2 st) Sam Alvey October 4, 2013 1
Welterweight 170 lb (77 kg; 12 st) Nathan Coy May 4, 2012 0
Lightweight 155 lb (70 kg; 11.1 st) Tom Gallicchio May 9, 2014 0
Featherweight 145 lb (66 kg; 10.4 st) Vacant N/A
Bantamweight 135 lb (61 kg; 9.6 st) Anthony Birchak October 4, 2013 0

Title history[edit]

Heavyweight Championship[edit]

206-265 lbs (93 - 120 kg)
No. Name Event Date Defenses
1 Anthony Hamilton
def. Smealinho Rama
MFC 38:
Behind Enemy Lines
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
October 4, 2013 1. def. Darrill Schoonover at MFC 39: No Remorse on Jan. 17, 2014

Light Heavyweight Championship[edit]

186 to 205 lbs (84 to 93 kg)
No. Name Event Date Defenses
1 Victor Valimaki
def. Jason Day
MFC 10:
Unfinished Business
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
September 8, 2006

1. def. Jared Kilkenny at MFC 11: Gridiron on Feb 3, 2007

2 Roger Hollett MFC 13:
Lucky 13
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
August 24, 2007
3 Emanuel Newton MFC 19:
Long Time Coming
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
December 5, 2008
4 Trevor Prangley MFC 21:
Hard Knocks
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
May 15, 2009
Trevor Prangley was stripped of the title and released from the MFC on October 25, 2009.[8]
5 Ryan Jimmo
def. Dwayne Lewis
MFC 28:
Supemacy
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
February 25, 2011

1. def. Zak Cummings at MFC 29: Conquer on Apr 8, 2011
2. def. Rameau Thierry Sokoudjou at MFC 31: The Rundown on Oct 7, 2011

Jimmo vacated the title on November 29, 2011 when he left MFC for the UFC.[9]

Middleweight Championship[edit]

171 to 185 lbs (77 to 84 kg)
No. Name Event Date Defenses
1 Patrick Côté
def. Jason MacDonald
MFC 9:
No Excuses
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
March 10, 2006 [10]
Côté is stripped of the title.
2 Elvis Mutapcic
def. Joseph Henle
MFC 35:
Explosive Encounter
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
October 26, 2012 1. def. Sam Alvey at MFC 36: Reality Check on Feb. 15, 2013
Mutapcic vacated the title when he signed with World Series of Fighting.
2 Sam Alvey
def. Jason South
MFC 38:
Behind Enemy Lines
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
October 4, 2013 1. def. Wes Swofford at MFC 40: Crowned Kings on May 9, 2014

Welterweight Championship[edit]

156 to 170 lbs (70 to 77 kg)
No. Name Event Date Defenses
1 Pat Healy
def. Ryan Ford
MFC 17:
Hostile Takeover
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
July 25, 2008

1. def. Ryan Ford at MFC 20: Destined for Greatness on Feb 20, 2009

Healy vacated the title when he left the MFC for Strikeforce.
2 Douglas Lima
def. Jesse Juarez
MFC 27:
Breaking Point
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
November 12, 2010

1. def. Terry Martin at MFC 29: Conquer on Apr 8, 2011

Lima vacated the title on May 9, 2011 when he left the MFC for Bellator.[11]
3 Nathan Coy
def. Ryan McGillivray
MFC 33:
Collision Course
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
May 4, 2012

Lightweight Championship[edit]

146 to 155 lbs (66 to 70 kg)
No. Name Event Date Defenses
1 Antonio McKee
def. Derrick Noble
MFC 20:
Destined for Greatness
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
February 20, 2009 1. def. Luciano Azevedo at MFC 26: Retribution on Sep 10, 2010
On April 26, 2011, the MFC announced that McKee had agreed to "mutually vacate" the title, a statement McKee denied.[12]
On July 1, 2011, the MFC announced that McKee had reached a new deal with the promotion, and was reinstated as champion.[13]
McKee is stripped of the title on January 26, 2012 when he failed to make weight for his MFC 32 title defense.[14]
2 Graham Spencer
def. Mukai Maromo
MFC 36:
Reality Check
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
February 15, 2013
Spencer vacated the title on November 28, 2013 due to lingering injuries. He plans to drop to the featherweight division when he returns in 2014.[15]
3 Tom Gallicchio
def. Kurt Southern
MFC 40:
Crowned Kings
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
May 9, 2014

Bantamweight Championship[edit]

126 to 135 lbs (57 to 61 kg)
No. Name Event Date Defenses
1 Anthony Birchak
def. Tito Jones
MFC 38:
Behind Enemy Lines
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
October 4, 2013 Vs. Kevin Croom at MFC 40: Crowned Kings on May 9, 2014

References[edit]

External links[edit]