Maya Angelou Academy

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The Maya Angelou Academy at New Beginnings, renamed from Oak Hill Academy in May 2009,[1] is an alternative school operated by the non-profit See Forever Foundation. The school is located east of Laurel, Maryland in Anne Arundel County at the New Beginnings Youth Center, the District of Columbia's secure facility for youth who are adjudicated as delinquent and committed to its Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services.[2]

The See Forever Foundation began management of the academy in June 2007[2] upon winning a three-year $12 million contract.[3] Founding principal David Domenici is the son of former New Mexico senator Pete Domenici.[4] Domenici subsequently led the Consortium for Educational Excellence in Secure Settings.[5] Maya Angelou visited the school on April 30, 2009,[6][7] when it had 90 students, ranging from 14 to 19 years old.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "See Forever Foundation History". seeforever.org. See Forever Foundation. Retrieved 2009-06-24. [dead link]
  2. ^ a b "Maya Angelou Academy". seeforever.org. See Forever Foundation. Retrieved February 22, 2013. 
  3. ^ Houppert, Karen (April 12, 2009). "School of Second Chances". The Washington Post. p. W18. Retrieved June 24, 2009. "... in 2007 [Domenici and Forman] were awarded a $12 million contract to run the school for the next three years." 
  4. ^ Houppert, Karen (April 12, 2009). "School of Second Chances". The Washington Post. p. W18. Retrieved June 24, 2009. "Domenici is the son of former New Mexico Republican senator Pete Domenici." 
  5. ^ "Knewton Launches Adaptive Learning Solution". Health & Beauty Close-Up (Close-Up Media  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required)). November 29, 2012. Retrieved February 22, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Maya Angelou Visits Md. Students". myfoxdc.com. Fox Television Stations. April 30, 2009. Retrieved 7 July 2009. 
  7. ^ Schwind, Dan (May 7, 2009). "Maya Angelou pays a visit to Oak Hill". explorehoward.com (Laurel Leader). Retrieved June 24, 2009. 
  8. ^ Houppert, Karen (April 12, 2009). "School of Second Chances". The Washington Post. p. W18. Retrieved June 24, 2009. "Many of the 90 Oak Hill students, ranging in age from 14 to 19, come in performing way below grade level, and nearly half have been diagnosed with learning disabilities." 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°6′7″N 76°47′15″W / 39.10194°N 76.78750°W / 39.10194; -76.78750