Mayfair Games

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Mayfair Games
Industry Board games
Fate Acquired
Successors Ironwind, Inc.
Defunct 1997
Headquarters Chicago, Illinois, US
Key people Darwin Bromley
Products Role Aids, DC Heroes, Board games

Mayfair Games is a publisher of board, card, and roleplaying games. They also license German-style board games and publish them in English throughout the world. They license the worldwide English-language rights to publish the The Settlers of Catan series from Catan GmbH.

Ironwind, Inc.
Trading name Mayfair Games
Type Private
Industry Board games
Fate Reorganized, moved 2001
Successors Mayfair Games, Inc.
Founded 1997
Founders Iron Crown Enterprises
Headquarters Skokie, Illinois, US
Products Train games, Card games, Dice games
Services Foreign and domestic game distribution
Website mayfairgames.com

History[edit]

The genre of Crayon Rails board games was started by Mayfair's publication in 1982 of Empire Builder.

Mayfair Games was originally founded by 1981[1] by Darwin Bromley in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Robert T. Carty, Jr., its current Executive VP, came on board in 1998. Its current president, Larry Roznai, took over in 1999 and oversees operations. Chairman since 1997, Pete Fenlon became CEO in 2007. Coleman Charlton became Director of Products that same year, the latter half of which marked a major reorganization with a refocusing on Catan and other core brands.

In 1982, Mayfair released its War in the Falklands game just as the war ended, leading the English press to accuse Mayfair of "ghoulish" exploitation.[2]

Gary Gygax had advocated arranging a licensing agreement between TSR, Inc. and Mayfair Games for their Role Aids line of game supplements, but was outvoted in the board meeting considering the question.[3]

In 1993, Mayfair was sued by TSR, who argued that Role Aids—advertised as compatible with Advanced Dungeons & Dragons—violated their 1984 trademark agreement. While the court found that some of the line violated their trademark, the line as a whole did not violate the agreement,[4] and Mayfair continued publishing the line until the rights were bought by TSR.

In 1997, Mayfair shut down for financial reasons, and was subsequently bailed out by Iron Crown Enterprises (ICE), who purchased most of the company's assets and restarted operations as Ironwind, Inc. This new company operates publicly under the Mayfair Games trademark, and was owned 30% by ICE and 70% by the principals who had arranged the bailout.[5] During the bailout by ICE, a warehouse was purchased by a dice company, and the MEGS role-playing game ended up in the hands of Janet Bromley.

In 2003, Mayfair started publishing games by daVinci Games, beginning with the card game Bang!.

In 2005 Mayfair also began distributing all of the games published by Phalanx Games.

Mayfair has worldwide English-language publication and distribution rights for the The Settlers of Catan family of games.

In 2011 Mayfair released the card games Struggle for Catan and Rivals for Catan to highlight the brand's 15th anniversary.

In 2012, Mayfair released Star Trek Catan, the first Catan game with a licensed theme—in this case, Star Trek.

Mayfair Games, Inc.
Type Private
Industry Board games
Founded 2001
Headquarters Skokie, Illinois, US
Products Train games, Card games, Dice games
Services Foreign and domestic game distribution
Website mayfairgames.com

Games[edit]

This list includes both games originally published by Mayfair and games licensed by Mayfair from other publishers.

Board games[edit]

Card games[edit]

Roleplaying games[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Better Business Bureau, Skokie Illinois. "Founding Date Mayfair Games". Better Business Bureau. Better Business Bureau. Retrieved 4 June 2011. 
  2. ^ Hind, Jim (November–December 1982). "War in the Falklands". The Wargamer 1 (22). 
  3. ^ Sacco, Ciro Alessandro. "The Ultimate Interview with Gary Gygax". thekyngdoms.com. Retrieved October 24, 2008. 
  4. ^ TSR, Inc. v. Mayfair Games, Inc., 1993 WL 79272 (N.D. Ill.)
  5. ^ A Brief History of Game #9: Ice, Part Two: 1993-Present
  6. ^ Vasel, Tom (2005). "Abracadabra". The Dice Tower. Retrieved February 20, 2006. 

External links[edit]