McCulloch County, Texas

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McCulloch County, Texas
Mcculloch county courthouse 2010.jpg
Map of Texas highlighting McCulloch County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1856
Named for Benjamin McCulloch
Seat Brady
Largest city Brady
Area
 • Total 1,073 sq mi (2,779 km2)
 • Land 1,066 sq mi (2,761 km2)
 • Water 8 sq mi (21 km2), 0.7%
Population
 • (2010) 8,283
 • Density 8/sq mi (3/km²)
Congressional district 11th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.mcculloch.tx.us

McCulloch County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. At the 2010 census, its population was 8,283.[1] Its county seat is Brady.[2] The county is named for Benjamin McCulloch, a famous Texas Ranger and Confederate general.

The geographical center of Texas lies within McCulloch County, near Brady.[3]

History[edit]

  • 5000 BC – 1500 AD - Early native American inhabitants included Tonkawa, Lipan Apache, Comanche, and Tawakoni.[4]
  • 1788 - José Mares expedition from San Antonio to Santa Fe[5]
  • 1831, November 21 - In the Brady vicinity, James Bowie, Rezin P. Bowie, David Buchanan, Cephas D. Hamm, Matthew Doyle, Jesse Wallace, Thomas McCaslin, Robert Armstrong, James Coryell with two servants, Charles and Gonzales, held at bay for a day and a night 164 Caddo and Lipans. After 80 warriors have been killed, the Indians withdrew.[6]
  • 1852 - Camp San Saba was established to protect settlers from Indians.[7]
  • 1856 - The Sixth Legislature forms McCulloch County from Bexar, named for Benjamin McCulloch.[4]
  • 1876 - The Voca Waterwheel Mill was built.[8]
  • 1880 - The Brady Sentinel was established by D.F. Hayes, county’s first newspaper. Later, it was absorbed by the Heart o’ Texas News run by R.B. Boyle.[4]
  • 1886-1912 - County Swedish colonies of East Sweden,[9] West Sweden[10] and Melvin[11] were established.
  • 1897-1910 - The Brady Enterprise or McCulloch County Enterprise was published.[4]
  • 1899 McCulloch County sandstone courthouse built. Romanesque Revival style by architects Martin & Moodie.[12]
  • 1900 - The Milburn Messenger was edited by T.F. Harwell. Cotton became a major county crop.[4]
  • 1903 - The Fort Worth and Rio Grande Railway came to McCulloch.[4]
  • 1904-1907 - W.D. Currie published the Mercury Mascot.[4]
  • 1906-1910 - The McCulloch County Star was published.[4]
  • 1909 - The Brady Standard, edited by F.W. Schwenker, began publication, and absorbed the McCulloch County Star and the Brady Enterprise in 1910.[4]
  • 1909 - The Rochelle Record was started by W.D. Cowan.[4]
  • 1915 - The Melvin Rustler began publication.[4]
  • 1917 - J. Marvin Hunter founded the Melvin Enterprise.[4]
  • 1920’s - McCulloch County billed itself as "the Turkey Center of the Universe", and held an annual Turkey Trot.[4]
  • 1923 - Hunter also founded the Frontier Times in Melvin, and later moved it to Bandera.[13]
  • 1923 - Dan Collins Taylor, a rodeo performer and promoter was born in Doole in McCulloch County. He died there in 2010.[14]
  • 1930’s - Tenant farming in the county peaked at 60%.[4]
  • 1932 - The Colorado River flooded, cresting at 62.2 feet (19.0 m).[4]
  • 1938 - Brady Creek flooded, cresting at 29.1 feet (8.9 m). The San Saba River flooded, cresting at 39.8 feet (12.1 m).[15]
  • 1941 - Curtis Field, named for Brady Mayor Harry L. Curtis, opened with 80 students as a flying school.[16]
  • 1943 - A county prisoner of war camp was set up and included Rommel's Afrika Corps, as well as members of the S.S. and the Gestapo.[4]
  • 1946 - Crockett State School took over the former POW camp and used it as a training school for delinquent black girls.[17]
  • 1954-1960 - Forty-eight restraining structures were installed in the county to control flooding.[4]
  • 1963 - Brady Creek Reservoir was constructed to partially control flooding on the San Saba River.[18] Tourist Information Marker placed, declaring McCulloch the geographical center of Texas.[19]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,073 square miles (2,780 km2), of which 1,066 square miles (2,760 km2) is land and 8 square miles (21 km2) (0.7%) is water.[20]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 173
1880 1,533 786.1%
1890 3,217 109.8%
1900 3,960 23.1%
1910 13,405 238.5%
1920 11,020 −17.8%
1930 13,883 26.0%
1940 13,208 −4.9%
1950 11,701 −11.4%
1960 8,815 −24.7%
1970 8,571 −2.8%
1980 8,735 1.9%
1990 8,778 0.5%
2000 8,205 −6.5%
2010 8,283 1.0%
Est. 2012 8,313 0.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[21]
1850-2010[22]
2012 Estimate[1]

At the 2000 census[23], 8,205 people, 3,277 households and 2,267 families resided in the county. The population density was 8 per square mile (3/km²). There were 4,184 housing units at an average density of 4 per square mile (2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 84.64% White, 1.57% Black or African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 11.71% from other races, and 1.63% from two or more races. About 27% of the population were Hispanic or Latinos of any race.

Of the 3,277 households, 30.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.30% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.80% were not families. About 28.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.01. About 26.60% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.60% from 18 to 24, 22.90% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, and 19.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.00 males.

The median household income was $25,705 and the median family income was $30,783. Males had a median income of $25,844 versus $18,337 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,579. About 17.30% of families and 22.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.40% of those under age 18 and 21.50% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

The following school districts serve McCulloch County:

Government and infrastructure[edit]

In 1947, the State of Texas opened the Brady State School for Negro Girls in a former prisoner of war camp in McCulloch County, near Brady on a former prisoner of war camp leased from the Federal Government of the United States. In 1950, the state replaced the Brady facility with the Crockett State School.[24]

Communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 21, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Environment". Texas Almanac. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved May 3, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Smyrl, Vivian Elizabeth. "McCulloch County". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  5. ^ Bolton, Herbert Eugene (1915). Texas in the middle eighteenth century: Studies in Spanish colonial history and administration. University of Michigan Library. p. 130. 
  6. ^ "Site of Indian Battle - Brady vicinity, McCulloch County, Texas". Texas Historical Markers. William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  7. ^ "Fort McKavett". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  8. ^ "Voca Waterwheel Mill". Texas Historical Markers. William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  9. ^ "East Sweden". Texas Historical Markers. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  10. ^ "West Sweden". Texas Historical Markers. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  11. ^ "Melvin". Texas Historical Markers. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  12. ^ "McCulloch County Courthouse". Texas Historical Markers. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  13. ^ "About J. Marvin Hunter and Hunter's FRONTIER TIMES Magazine". Frontier Times. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  14. ^ "Becky Orr, "Cowboy was boss of Chute 9 at CFD for 49 years"". wyomingnews.com. Retrieved August 4, 2011. 
  15. ^ Burnett, Jonathan (2008). Flash Floods in Texas. TAMU Press. pp. 111–128. ISBN 978-1-58544-590-5. 
  16. ^ "About Brady Curtis Airfield". Sandhills Publishing Company. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  17. ^ Smyrl, Vivian Elizabeth. "Crockett State School". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  18. ^ Breeding, Seth D. "Brady Reservoir". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  19. ^ "Geographic Center of Texas - Brady vicinity, McCulloch County, Texas". Texas State Historical Markers. William Nienke, Sam Morrow. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  20. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  21. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved December 21, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Texas Almanac: County Population History 1850-2010". Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved December 21, 2013. 
  23. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  24. ^ "Crockett State School." Handbook of Texas Online. Retrieved on August 8, 2010.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 31°12′N 99°21′W / 31.20°N 99.35°W / 31.20; -99.35