McFarlane Bridge

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
McFarlane Bridge
Carries Motor vehicles Pedestrians
Crosses South arm of the Clarence River
Locale Maclean, New South Wales,  Australia
Owner Roads and Maritime Services formerly Roads and Traffic Authority
Maintained by Roads and Maritime Services
Engineering design E. M. de Burgh
Design Beam bridge, Bascule bridge
Material Timber and Wrought iron
Longest span 20.3 metres (67 ft)
Number of spans 17 (1 x 20.3 + 16 x 13.7 m)
Constructed by Mountney and Company
Construction begin 1904 (1904)
Construction end 1906 (1906)
Opened 9 April 1906[1]

The McFarlane Bridge is a road bridge over the south arm of the Clarence River on the Lawrence Rd at Maclean, New South Wales, Australia. The bridge connects the communities of Maclean and Woodford Island.

The bridge has 16 timber beam spans of 13.7 m and one wrought iron and timber lifting span of 20.3 m supported by cast iron piers. The deck of the whole bridge is sawn hardwood. It was designed by E. M. de Burgh and constructed by Mountney and Company between 1904 and 1906. The central bascule type lifting span, notable for its cardioid counterweight track, became redundant and it was last opened for shipping in 1962.[2] The bridge was named after John McFarlane local member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly.[1]

The history of the bridge was memorialised in a book The Centenary Of Mcfarlane Bridge Maclean 1906-2006 published by the Maclean District Historical Society.[3]

The bridge is an important link in the area carrying significant road traffic. As a number of components of the bridge require replacement, the major refurbishment work of the bridge will be carried out from June 2012 to June 2013.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "McFarlane Bridge, Clarence River, Maclean, 1906". Engineers Australia. Retrieved 11 March 2015. 
  2. ^ "McFarlane Bridge". Tasmanian Timber Promotion Board (University of Tasmania). Retrieved 21 June 2012. 
  3. ^ "The Centenary Of Mcfarlane Bridge". Angus Robertson. Retrieved 21 June 2012. 
  4. ^ "McFarlane Bridge Project". Roads and Maritime Services. 17 May 2012. Retrieved 21 June 2012. 

External links[edit]