McGill University Faculty of Engineering

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McGill University Faculty of Engineering
Governance
Dean Jim Nicell
Departments
  • Department of Chemical Engineering
  • Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics
  • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Department of Mechanical Engineering
  • Department of Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering
  • School of Architecture
  • School of Urban Planning
Non-departmental programs
Institutes
  • McGill Institute for Advanced Materials
  • McGill NanoEngineering Research

The Faculty of Engineering is one of the constituent faculties of the McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, offering undergraduate and graduate degrees in chemical, civil, computer, software, electrical, mechanical, metals and materials, and mining engineering, as well as architecture and urban planning. The faculty also teaches courses in bio-resource engineering (Faculty of Agriculture) and in biomedical engineering (Faculty of Medicine) at the masters level.

Departments and Schools[edit]

The faculty includes five departments and two schools:

  • Department of Chemical Engineering
  • Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics
  • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Department of Mechanical Engineering
  • Department of Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering
  • School of Architecture
  • School of Urban Planning

Established in 1871, the mining engineering program is the oldest in Canada.[1] It is the oldest program of its kind in North America, followed closely by the one offered at Colorado School of Mines, established in 1874.

McGill was the first university in Canada to give instruction in Applied Science. Out of this legacy grew today's faculty of engineering.

Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics[edit]

The Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics (est. 1871) offers programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The Department currently has twenty-three full-time faculty members. In addition, an industrial perspective is provided in the classroom by adjunct professors who are practising civil engineers. The Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics is ranked first or second in Canada and top ten worldwide.[citation needed] The lowest average accepted for Fall 2011 was ninety-one percent for students outside of Quebec.

There are approximately two hundred undergraduate and eighty graduate students in the department, of whom nearly one-half are women and one-third are from outside Canada. Broad programs of study are available that offer specialized courses in all areas of civil engineering. Facilities include state-of-the-art teaching, research, and computing laboratories.

School of Urban Planning[edit]

The Macdonald-Harrington Building, named in honor of William Christopher Macdonald. Since 1987, the Schools of Architecture and Urban Planning have been housed in the Macdonald-Harrington Building, which was originally constructed in 1896 by Sir Andrew Taylor to accommodate the Departments of Chemistry and Mining by 1896. The building was renovated for Architecture and Urban Planning by architects Ray Affleck and Arcop Associates in 1987.

The School of Urban Planning is a unit within the Faculty of Engineering. The school is a corresponding member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning.[2] The present director is Raphaël Fischler.

McGill was the first university in Canada to offer a full-time program in urban planning. An interdisciplinary program through which students combined a master's degree in their original field was combined with urban planning was established in 1947. An autonomous program was established in 1972. In 1976, the School of Urban Planning was established as a unit within the Faculty of Engineering. The School of Architecture is also a unit within the Faculty of Engineering.

The School offers three Master of Urban Planning programs (a Core Program, with a concentration in Transportation Planning, and with a Concentration in Urban Design) and a Ph.D. in Urban Planning, Policy, and Design program. Major research areas include the Community-University Research Alliance (CURA), Transportation Research at McGill (TRAM), and Whole-corridor Urban Design Strategies (WCUDS).

School of Architecture[edit]

Founded in 1896, McGill’s School of Architecture is among the oldest architecture schools in North America, offering professional and post-professional programs from undergraduate through to PhD levels. The School has established an international reputation and a record of producing leading professionals and researchers, with McGill alumni practicing and teaching in firms and institutions across the nation and the globe. It is housed in the stunning Macdonald-Harrington Building, by Montreal architect Andrew Taylor. The School of Architecture has produced renowned architects, including Arthur Erickson, Moshe Safdie, Melvin Charney, Raymond Affleck, Catherine Wisnicki, Blanche van Ginkel, Witold Rybczynski, and Raymond Moriyama; leading Montreal-based architects such as Howard Davies and Anne Cormier of Atelier Big City and Annie Lebel of In Situ; Julia Gerzovitz and Alain Founier of FGMAA, Danny Pearl and Mark Poddubuik of L’OEUF as well as contemporary international architects such as Adam Caruso (London), Amale Andraos (Work Architecture, New York), Eric Bunge (nArchitects, New York). Other School of Architecture graduates have gone on to prestigious careers in education, urban development, government, business, film, digital gaming, and entertainment.

List of Directors:

Faculty include Annmarie Adams, Vikram Bhatt, Martin Bressani, Ricardo Castro, David Covo, Avi Friedman, Michael Jemtrud, Nik Luka, Robert Mellin, Alberto Pérez-Gómez, Aaron Sprecher, Ipek Tureli, David Newton, and David Theodore. Retired faculty include Bruce Anderson, Derek Drummond, Adrian Sheppard and Radoslav Zuk. The school has an active alumni network and a public lecture series. It is accredited by the Canadian Architectural Certification Board until 2018.

References[edit]

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