McIntosh County, Oklahoma

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McIntosh County, Oklahoma
Map of Oklahoma highlighting McIntosh County
Location in the state of Oklahoma
Map of the United States highlighting Oklahoma
Oklahoma's location in the U.S.
Founded 1907
Seat Eufaula
Largest city Checotah
Area
 • Total 712 sq mi (1,844 km2)
 • Land 620 sq mi (1,606 km2)
 • Water 92 sq mi (238 km2), 12.98%
Population (Est.)
 • (2012) 20,584
 • Density 29/sq mi (11/km²)
Congressional district 2nd

McIntosh CountyThis is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,252.[1] Its county seat is Eufaula.[2] The county is named for an influential Muscogee Creek family.[3]

History[edit]

Many archaeological sites in McIntosh County date back to the Archaic period in North America (6000 BC - 1 AD). (Ed. note: the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture defines this period as written here. The definition differs from that shown by the linked Wikipedia article.) Archaeologists have uncovered six cites since 2003 that predate these. Indigenous people may have made petroglyphs at the Handprint Site before the coming of the earliest European explorers.[3]

In 1825, the Lower Creeks, led by William McIntosh, agreed to exchange their land in the state of Georgia for land in what would become Oklahoma. Much of the new land covered what would become McIntosh County. Chief McIntosh himself died in Georgia before the migration. Once they arrived, the Creeks repeatedly battled with the Osage who frequented the area. In 1836, the Creeks established North Fork Town on the Texas Road, about two miles east of present-day Eufaula. A post office named Micco operated in North Fork Town from 1853 to 1886. This area became part of the Eufaula District of the Creek Nation.[3]

Albert Pike, representing the Confederate States of America, signed treaties with the Chickasaw, Choctaw and Creek nations at the beginning of the Civil War. The Battle of Honey Springs, the largest battle of the war in what is now Oklahoma, was fought near Rentiesville. The Union Army won a victory allowing it to control the part of Indian Territory north of the Arkansas River.[3]

The Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railway built a line through this area in 1871-2, generally following the Texas Road. The communities of Checotah and Eufaula were established then. In 1904-5, the Missouri, Oklahoma and Gulf Railway (later merged into the Kansas, Oklahoma and Gulf Railway) laid a line through the northwestern part of the area, starting the community of Hitchita.[3]

McIntosh County was established at statehood in 1907, when the population was 17,975. Before statehood, the area had been part of the Eufaula District of the Creek Nation. The county gained some land from Hughes County in 1915, but lost some land to Okmulgee County in 1918.[3] The former moved the community of Hanna from Hughes County. The latter moved the community of Stidham to Okmulgee County.[3]

Between 1907 and 1909, the people of Checotah were involved in a dispute with nearby Eufaula known as the McIntosh County Seat War. After Checotah was designated as the new county seat, the people of Eufaula refused to hand over the county records. Soon after, a group of heavily armed men from Chectotah attempted to sieze the records from the courthouse in Eufaula, but were beaten back and forced to surrender during the gunfight that followed. Eufaula was designated as the permanent seat of McIntosh County one year later.[4]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,845 km² (712 mi²), of which 1,606 km² (620 mi²) is land and 240 km² (92 mi²) (12.98%) is water.[5] Much of the water surface is attributable to Eufaula Lake, the largest reservoir entirely within the state. Checotah is the nearest city to Lake Checotah State Park (formerly Fountainhead State Park). The county is drained by the Deep Fork River, North Canadian River and Canadian River.[3]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Economy[edit]

The county economy has been based primarily on farming and ranching. Corn was the principal crop until 1900, when cotton superseded it (as measured by acreage) around the middle of the 20th Century. Other crops such as sorghum, oats and wheat also became important. However, construction of Eufaula Lake inundated much of the best cropland and caused a large scale decline in agriculture. Cotton farming essentially ceased in the county by the mid 1970s. Cattle ranching remained important, continuing to rise throughout the century. By 2000, the county reported 55,000 head of cattle.[3]

Mineral resources such as oil, natural gas, limestone, sand and gravel have also been important. While there are ample coal deposits, much of it has a high ash and sulfur content, so little except the low-sulfur type has been mined.[3]

Completion of Eufaula Lake in 1964 generated revenue from hydroelectric power, stimulated tourism and produced companion businesses like boat building and general retail.[3]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 20,961
1920 26,404 26.0%
1930 24,924 −5.6%
1940 24,097 −3.3%
1950 17,829 −26.0%
1960 12,371 −30.6%
1970 12,472 0.8%
1980 15,562 24.8%
1990 16,779 7.8%
2000 19,456 16.0%
2010 20,252 4.1%
Est. 2012 20,584 1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 19,456 people, 8,085 households, and 5,683 families residing in the county. The population density was 12/km² (31/mi²). There were 12,640 housing units at an average density of 8/km² (20/mi²). The racial makeup of the county was 72.59% White, 4.06% Black or African American, 16.20% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.35% from other races, and 6.63% from two or more races. 1.27% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 96.4% spoke English, 1.5% Muskogee and 1.5% Spanish as their first language.

There were 8,085 households out of which 25.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.60% were married couples living together, 10.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.70% were non-families. 26.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.84.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.60% under the age of 18, 6.40% from 18 to 24, 22.30% from 25 to 44, 26.90% from 45 to 64, and 21.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 91.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,964, and the median income for a family was $31,990. Males had a median income of $27,998 versus $19,030 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,410. About 13.50% of families and 18.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.80% of those under age 18 and 13.30% of those age 65 or over.

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of January 15, 2012[8]
Party Number of Voters Percentage
  Democratic 9,198 75.73%
  Republican 2,262 18.62%
  Unaffiliated 685 5.65%
Total 12,145 100%

Politics[edit]

Presidential election results[9]
Year Republican Democrat
2008 59.63% 4,903 40.37% 3,320
2004 51.11% 4,692 48.89% 4,488
2000 44.26% 3,444 54.05% 4,206

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

NRHP sites[edit]

The following sites in McIntosh County are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 9, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "McIntosh County."[1]
  4. ^ Butler, Ken (2007). More Oklahoma Renegades. Pelican Publishing. ISBN 1589804643. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved November 9, 2013. 
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ http://www.ok.gov/elections/documents/reg_0112.pdf
  9. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Retrieved 2011-06-11. 

Coordinates: 35°23′N 95°40′W / 35.38°N 95.67°W / 35.38; -95.67