Mechoopda

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Mechoopda Maidu Indians
Total population
413 enrolled members[1]
Regions with significant populations
 California
Languages
English, Konkow
Religion
Christianity, traditional tribal religions
Related ethnic groups
other Maidu people

The Mechoopda are a tribe of Maidu people, an indigenous peoples of California. They are enrolled in the Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria, a federally recognized tribe. Historically, the tribe has spoken Konkow, a language related to the Maidu language, and as of 2010, has created digital learning materials from old recordings of Emma Cooper, made during the 1940's as a part of the war effort.[2]

The tribe was formerly centered in a village located about 3 12 miles (5.6 km) south of contemporary Chico, California.[3] The Tribe was terminated in 1967, losing its 26-acre Chico Rancheria. Today, approximately one-half of the old Chico Rancheria is now owned by California State University, Chico (CSUC). The 11-acre university-owned portion of the former reservation is used by CSUC's agriculture, anthropology, and archaeology students.[4]

The Mechoopda regained federal recognition in 1992.

Government[edit]

The Mechoopda Indian Tribe ratified their constitution on 1 February 1998. The tribe is governed by a seven-member council.[1] The current administration is as follows:

  • Tribal Chairman: Dennis Ramirez
  • Vice Chairperson: Sandra Knight:
  • Treasurer: Barbara Rose
  • Secretary: B. Arlene Ward
  • Member-at-Large: Paulita Hopper
  • Member-at-Large: Donna Rose
  • Member-at-Large: Eileen Conway.[1]

Reservation[edit]

The Chico Rancheria is a federal reservation located in Butte County. The population on the rancheria is approximately 70. Chico is the closest town.[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Tribal Government." Mechoopda Maidu Indians. Retrieved 31 August 2012.
  2. ^ Meridith J. Cooper (2010-09-30). "Preserving Mechoopda tradition - A young tribe member creates a learning program using old recordings of the native language". Chico News & Review. Retrieved 2012-07-19. 
  3. ^ "Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park". EveryTrail. Retrieved 2012-07-19. 
  4. ^ "Conversation with Tribal Chairman Steve Santos". Inside Chico State - Volume 36 Number 3. Retrieved 2013-05-08. 
  5. ^ "California Indians and Their Reservations: Chico Rancheria." San Diego State University Library and Information Access. Retrieved 31 August 2012.

External links[edit]