Medford, New Jersey

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Medford, New Jersey
Township
Township of Medford
Medford Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Medford Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Medford Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Medford Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°51′51″N 74°49′21″W / 39.864269°N 74.822471°W / 39.864269; -74.822471Coordinates: 39°51′51″N 74°49′21″W / 39.864269°N 74.822471°W / 39.864269; -74.822471[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 1, 1847
Government[5]
 • Type Faulkner Act Council-Manager
 • Mayor Christopher Buoni (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Manager Katherine Burger (interim)[3]
 • Clerk Katherine Burger[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 39.929 sq mi (103.416 km2)
 • Land 38.921 sq mi (100.804 km2)
 • Water 1.008 sq mi (2.611 km2)  2.52%
Area rank 57th of 566 in state
8th of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 52 ft (16 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 23,033
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 23,281
 • Rank 108th of 566 in state
5th of 40 in county[11]
 • Density 591.8/sq mi (228.5/km2)
 • Density rank 429th of 566 in state
27th of 40 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08055[12][13]
Area code 609 exchanges: 654, 714, 953[14]
FIPS code 3400545120[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882083[17]
Website www.medfordtownship.com

Medford is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 23,033,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 780 (+3.5%) from the 22,253 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,727 (+8.4%) from the 20,526 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Medford was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 1, 1847, from portions of Evesham Township, based on the results of a referendum held that day. Portions of the township were taken to form Shamong Township (February 19, 1852), Lumberton Township (March 14, 1860) and Medford Lakes (May 17, 1939).[19]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 39.929 square miles (103.416 km2), of which, 38.921 square miles (100.804 km2) of it was land and 1.008 square miles (2.611 km2) of it (2.52%) was water.[1][2]

Medford Township borders Evesham Township (known as Marlton), Mount Laurel Township, Lumberton Township, Southampton Township, Tabernacle Township, Shamong Township, and Camden County.

Medford Lakes is an independent municipality encircled within the boundaries of Medford Township.

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[20] Part of the township is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Burlington County, along with areas in Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[21]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 3,022
1860 2,136 * −29.3%
1870 2,189 2.5%
1880 1,980 −9.5%
1890 1,864 −5.9%
1900 1,969 5.6%
1910 1,903 −3.4%
1920 1,891 −0.6%
1930 2,021 6.9%
1940 2,237 * 10.7%
1950 2,836 26.8%
1960 4,844 70.8%
1970 8,292 71.2%
1980 17,622 112.5%
1990 20,526 16.5%
2000 22,253 8.4%
2010 23,033 3.5%
Est. 2013 23,281 [10] 1.1%
Population sources: 1850-2000[22]
1850-1920[23] 1850-1870[24]
1850[25] 1870[26] 1880-1890[27]
1890-1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[19]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 23,033 people, 8,277 households, and 6,456 families residing in the township. The population density was 591.8 per square mile (228.5/km2). There were 8,652 housing units at an average density of 222.3 per square mile (85.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.33% (21,726) White, 1.53% (353) Black or African American, 0.16% (36) Native American, 2.03% (467) Asian, 0.03% (6) Pacific Islander, 0.56% (130) from other races, and 1.37% (315) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.60% (600) of the population.[7]

There were 8,277 households, of which 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.3% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.0% were non-families. 18.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.15.[7]

In the township, 26.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 20.6% from 25 to 44, 33.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.6 years. For every 100 females there were 94.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $107,883 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,728) and the median family income was $122,986 (+/- $5,037). Males had a median income of $82,169 (+/- $6,188) versus $58,324 (+/- $5,381) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $45,926 (+/- $2,571). About 0.8% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 1.5% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 22,253 people, 7,946 households, and 6,285 families residing in the township. The population density was 566.0 people per square mile (218.5/km²). There were 8,147 housing units at an average density of 207.2 per square mile (80.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.74% White, 0.76% African American, 0.12% Native American, 1.47% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.13% of the population.[31][32]

There were 7,946 households out of which 38.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.8% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.9% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.16.[31][32]

In the township the age distribution of the population shows 26.8% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 30.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.1 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the township was $83,059, and the median income for a family was $97,135. Males had a median income of $69,786 versus $37,012 for females. The per capita income for the township was $38,641. About 0.9% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 2.2% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Medford Township operates within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Council-Manager (Plan E) form of municipal government, implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of January 1, 1980.[34][3] The Township is governed by a five-member Council, elected at-large in partisan elections to four-year terms of office as part of the November general election on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election in odd-numbered years. At a reorganization meeting held in January after each election, the Council selects a Mayor and a Deputy Mayor from among its members.[5][3]

As of 2014, members of the Medford Township Council are Mayor Chris Buoni (R, term ends December 31, 2015), Deputy Mayor Chuck Watson (R, 2017), Jeff Beenstock (R, 2017), Frank Czekay (R, 2015) and James Pace (R, 2017).[3][35][36][37][38]

Victoria Fay was removed from her council seat in April 2011 after the other members of the council determined that she was a resident of Evesham Township in violation of a state law requiring elected officials to be residents of the municipality, having moved there in November 2010 during her pending divorce.[39] She was replaced in April by Dominic Grosso, a former township mayor.[40]

Jeff Beenstock was appointed in December 2011 to fill the vacancy of Dave Brown who resigned in November. James "Randy" Pace was elected in November 2013 to fill the remaining two years on council seat vacated by Joseph Lynn; Mark Sander had filled Lynn's vacant seat on an interim basis, but declined to run for election for the balance of the term.[41]

Mayor Chris Myers resigned from the Township Council in December 2011, after it was disclosed that he had hired a male escort. He was replaced in January 2012 by Chuck Watson.[42][43]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Medford Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[44] and is part of New Jersey's 8th state legislative district.[8][45][46]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[48][49] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[50][51]

For the 2004-15 Session, the 8th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Dawn Marie Addiego (R, Evesham Township) and in the General Assembly by Christopher J. Brown (R, Evesham Township) and Maria Rodriguez-Gregg (R, Evesham Township).[52] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[53] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[54]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[55] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[55] As of 2014, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce Garganio (R, 2014; Florence Township),[56] Deputy Director Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[57] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[58] Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2016; Cinnaminson Township)[59] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[60][55][61] Gargiano was named in March 2014 to serve the unexpired term of Leah Arter and was chosen to fill her position as Freeholder Director.[62]

Education[edit]

The Medford Township Public Schools is a public school district that serves students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade, with five elementary schools serving students in preschool through fifth grade, a single school serving sixth graders and another school serving seventh and eighth graders. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's seven schools had an enrollment of 3,019 students and 202.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.95:1.[63] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[64]) are five elementary schools — Milton H. Allen School[65] (388 students; grades K-5), Chairville Elementary School[66] (503; PreK-5), Cranberry Pines School[67] (363; K-5), Kirby's Mill Elementary School[68] (331; PreK-5) and Taunton Forge School[69] (325; K-5) — Haines 6th Grade Center[70] for 6th grade (372) and Medford Memorial Middle School[71] for 7th and 8th grades (737).[72][73]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Shawnee High School, located in Medford Township,whichserves students in ninth through twelfth grade from both Medford Lakes and Medford Township.[74][75] The school is part of the Lenape Regional High School District, which also serves students from Evesham Township, Mount Laurel Township, Shamong Township, Southampton Township, Tabernacle Township and Woodland Township.[76]

Burlington County Institute of Technology is a countywide public high school offering training to students throughout Burlington County, with campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[77] As of the 2010-11 school year, enrollment at the Medford campus was 805 students.[78]

Established in 1954, St. Mary of the Lakes School is a Catholic school that serves students in Pre-K through eighth grade, operated under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton.[79][80]

History[edit]

The area known as Medford was sold to Samual Coles in 1670, in all it consisted of 900 acres (3.6 km²). Within the next few years the Braddock, Prickett, Stratton, Branin, and Wilkins families moved to the area (many of whom continue to live in the area today). Upper Evesham, as it was then known, continued to grow from scattered homesteads into a small village. Many of the building and roads built between the sale of the land and the American Revolutionary War are still in existence, which include Oliphant's Mill, Christopher's Mill and the Shamong Trail (now known as Stokes Road).

In 1820, when the Post Office opened, the area was officially called Medford of Upper Evesham, using a name that had been pushed by Mark Reeve, a developer who had recently visited Medford, Massachusetts.[81] On March 1, 1847, Medford Township was "set apart from" Evesham Township by Act of the New Jersey Legislature.[19] The first township meeting was held at the Cross Roads (County Route 541 and Church Road) on March 9, 1847. The seat of township government remained there for several years. Part of Medford Township was taken on February 19, 1852, to form Shamong Township, on March 14, 1860, portions were taken to form Lumberton Township. The borders remained unchanged until May 17, 1939, when Medford Lakes was formed.[19]

A thriving glass making industry developed in Medford as early as 1825 with a glass making furnace making window panes. By 1850, William Porter was operating a glass factory on a triangle of property formed by South Main Street, Mill Street, and Trimble Street. Glass making operating continued on the property throughout the 1880s under company names including Medford Glass Works and Star Glass, which at its peak employed about 250 workers and built up a "company town" of sorts with houses for owners and managers and housing for workers. A company store enabled workers to exchange scrip for food and necessities. Glassmaking operations ended around 1925 and the factory was torn down by the mid-1940s. Today, many of the nearly thirty workers homes are neatly kept homes on Trimble and Mill Streets, as well as the owners' / managers' residence at 126 South Main St. and the company store at 132 South Main St.[82]

Medford's location along the Camden and Atlantic Railroad, increased trade and Medford expanded at a rapid rate in the years after the Civil War. By the 1920s the rail line had been dismantled and the mill industry was in decline, but Medford's proximity to Philadelphia and Camden County allowed the township's growth to continue as many families moved from the city and into a more rural area.

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 179.25 miles (288.47 km) of roadways, of which 153.27 miles (246.66 km) were maintained by the municipality, 21.85 miles (35.16 km) by Burlington County and 4.13 miles (6.65 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[83]

Major roads in Medford include Route 70, CR 532, CR 541, and CR 544.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit used to provide bus service to and from Philadelphia on the 406 bus route which ended in Evesham Township but has been discontinued.[84] Greyhound Lines provides nationwide service from nearby Mount Laurel.

Points of interest[edit]

  • Kirby's Mill is a grist mill (flour mill) that has been added to the National Register of Historic Places.[85]
  • JCC Camps at Medford near Medford Lakes is the largest Jewish day camp in North America, operating since 1942. Part of the Jewish Federation of Southern New Jersey, the camp is accredited by the American Camp Association.[86] It accepts children as young as four years old, and campers come from all over the tri-county area (Camden, Burlington, and Gloucester counties). Teenagers age 14 or older can join the Counselor-in-Training program to become counselors, lifeguards, or specialists. The camp offers a kosher lunch. The camp is surrounded by the many lakes of Medford, located within the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Lake Atsion, near U.S. Route 206, is near the camp. The campsite has a 4-acre (16,000 m2) lake for boating and fishing, as well as four in-ground pools for swimming. There are four playgrounds, a petting zoo and several athletic fields, including tennis and hockey courts, and a ropes course.
  • Camp Ockanickon, established in 1906, is a YMCA summer camp and conference center that covers 800 acres (320 ha) in the Pine Barrens.[87]
  • Medford Canoe Trail is a recently cleared canoe trail connecting Medford Park to Kirby's Mill.[88]
  • Historic Medford Village offer shopping, historic homes and an old-fashioned atmosphere, servingas the site of Medford's traditional Dickens Festival.[89]
  • Woodford Cedar Run Wildlife Refuge is a 170-acre nature preserve and wildlife rehabilitation center located on the southern border of Medford and is open to the public.[90]
  • Freedom Park is a public park with extensive playground equipment, basketball and volleyball courts, bike paths, large pavilions, and large multipurpose fields including a dog run.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Medford include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ a b c d e Council and Manager's Office, Township of Medford. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  4. ^ Clerk's Office, Township of Medford. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 38.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Medford, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Medford Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 5. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Medford Township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
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  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Medford, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 18, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Medford, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 27, 2013.
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  20. ^ The Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  21. ^ Pinelands Municipalities, New Jersey Pinelands Commission, April 2003. Accessed November 27, 2013.
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  24. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 264, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 15, 2013. "Medford township in 1850 contained a population of 3,022; in 1860, 2,136; and in 1870, 2,189. The town of Medford, on Haynes creek, is in this township."
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  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Medford township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
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  39. ^ Simpson, Rachel. "Victoria Fay voted off Medford council... again", The Central record, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 27, 2013. "In the matter of Victoria Fay’s position on Medford Township council, the verdict is — she’s out — at least for now. In a unanimous decision, the four remaining council members declared their decision to vacate Fay’s seat during a regularly scheduled meeting on Monday night (March 21).... Fay brought the matter to court upon being faced with accusations that she was domiciled in Evesham Township, therefore violating a residency requirement for elected officials who must live in the town they serve."
  40. ^ Coppock, Kristen. "Former mayor replaces Fay", Burlington County Times, April 19, 2011. Accessed November 27, 2013. "Former Mayor Dominic Grosso was appointed to the Township Council Monday night, replacing ousted elected official Victoria Fay."
  41. ^ Coppock, Kristen. "Council newcomer replaces Brown in Medford", Burlington County Times, December 6, 2011. Accessed November 27, 2013. "Republican Jeff Beenstock was appointed and sworn onto the Township Council late Monday.... Beenstock replaces former Councilman Dave Brown, who resigned last month, citing work obligations."
  42. ^ a b Hefler, Jan. "Medford Mayor Chris Myers resigns amid sex scandal", The Philadelphia Inquirer, December 6, 2011. Accessed November 27, 2013. "Medford Mayor Chris Myers, plagued by allegations of a sex scandal involving a male escort, cited 'work commitments' when he resigned Monday."
  43. ^ Caulfield, Shannon. "Medford: A year in review January-June", South Jersey Sun News, December 26, 2012. Accessed November 27, 2013. "Councilman Chuck Watson was appointed to the council as replacement for former Mayor Chris Myers, who resigned December 2011."
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  58. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
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  63. ^ District information for Medford Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  64. ^ School Data for the Medford Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  65. ^ Milton H. Allen School, Medford Township Public Schools. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  66. ^ Chairville Elementary School, Medford Township Public Schools. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  67. ^ Cranberry Pines School, Medford Township Public Schools. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  68. ^ Kirby's Mill Elementary School, Medford Township Public Schools. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  69. ^ Taunton Forge School, Medford Township Public Schools. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  70. ^ Haines 6th Grade Center, Medford Township Public Schools. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  71. ^ Medford Memorial Middle School, Medford Township Public Schools. Accessed July 28, 2013.
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  73. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Medford Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  74. ^ Shawnee High School 2013 Report card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 14, 2014. "ATTENDANCE AREAS: Medford Township, Medford Lakes Borough"
  75. ^ High School Sending Districts, Burlington County Library System, backed up by the Internet Archive as of September 27, 2006. Accessed September 14, 2014.
  76. ^ Lenape Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 14, 2014. "The Lenape Regional High School District serves the eight municipalities of Evesham, Medford, Mount Laurel, Shamong, Southampton, Tabernacle and Woodland Townships and Medford Lakes Borough."
  77. ^ Who We Are, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  78. ^ School Data for the Burlington County Institute of Technology, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 18, 2013.
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