Media regulation

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Media regulation is the control or guidance of mass media by governments and other bodies. This regulation, via law, rules or procedures, can have various goals, for example intervention to protect a stated "public interest", or encouraging competition and an effective media market, or establishing common technical standards.[1]

The principal targets of media regulation are the press, radio and television, but may also include film, recorded music, cable, satellite, storage and distribution technology (discs, tapes etc.), the internet, mobile phones etc.

By country[edit]

United States[edit]

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution forbids the government from abriding freedom of speech or freedom of the press.

There are regulations on broadcasters on the public airwaves: the Federal Communications Commission forbids the broadcast of "indecent" material on the public airwaves. The accidental exposure of Janet Jackson's nipple during the halftime show at Super Bowl XXXVIII led to the passage of the Broadcast Decency Enforcement Act of 2005 which increased the maximum fine that the FCC could level for indecent broadcasts from $32,500 to $325,000—with a maximum liability of $3 million.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "What is media regulation?". Media Regulation. Leicester: University of Leicester. Retrieved 29 November 2012.