Medical royal colleges

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A number of medical royal colleges operate across a range of Commonwealth countries, having received royal patronage and permission to use the prefix 'Royal'. Each college is responsible for a different specialty within the medical field, in keeping with other types of royal college.

Standards and guidance[edit]

They are generally charged with setting standards within their field and for supervising the training of doctors within that specialty, although the responsibility for the application of those standards in the UK, since 2010, rests with the General Medical Council.

In the United Kingdom and Ireland most medical royal colleges are members of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) are listed below, with their postgraduate faculties (some of which are independently members of the Academy) and institutes. The Academy of Medical Royal Colleges itself has one faculty of its own - the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management.

International role[edit]

The Royal Colleges are involved with international activities to improve health through education and training, with some of these efforts coordinated by the International Forum of the AoMRC.[1] The Royal College of General Practitioners has been actively involved on an international level to help family medicine doctors have access to “contextually relevant training and development programmes”.[2]

History of institutions[edit]

Medical colleges can seek royal patronage and permission to use the prefix Royal, usually also having a Royal charter.[3]

The letters in brackets are commonly used for or by the institution, for example in post-nominal letters that denote membership or fellowship. Dates in brackets are the year of incorporation by Royal charter. The origins of some of these institutions may predate their incorporation by many years, for example the origins of the Royal College of Surgeons of England may be traced directly to a Guild of Surgeons in the City of London in the fourteenth century.[4]

Dome institutions with similar functions are not listed here: they do not have a Royal Charter and are not members of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, for example the Irish Colleges of Anaesthetists, of General Practitioners, of Ophthalmologists and of Psychiatrists.

Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (RCSEd, 1506[5])
  • Faculty of Dental Surgery
  • Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine
  • Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care
  • Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine
  • Intercollegiate Faculty of Surgical Trainers
Royal College of Physicians of London (RCP, 1518[5])
Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow (RCPSG, 1599)
Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI, 1654)
  • Faculty of Occupational Medicine
  • Faculty of Paediatrics
  • Faculty of Pathology
  • Faculty of Public Health Medicine
  • Faculty of Sports and Exercise Medicine (joint with RCSI)
  • Institute of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh (RCPE, 1681)
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI, 1784)
  • Faculty of Dentistry
  • Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery
  • Faculty of Radiologists
  • Faculty of Sports and Exercise Medicine (joint with RCPI)
  • Institute of Leadership
Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCS, 1800[5])
Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC, 1929[6])
Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG, 1930[5])
Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP, 1952[5])
Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP, 1969[7])
Royal College of Pathologists (RCPath, 1970[5])
Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCPsych, 1971[5])
Royal College of Radiologists (RCR, 1975[5])
  • Faculty of Clinical Oncology
  • Faculty of Clinical Radiology
Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists (RANZCO, 1977)
Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners (RNZCGP, 1979[8])
Royal College of Ophthalmologists (RCOphth, 1988[5])
Royal College of Anaesthetists (RCoA, 1992[5])
  • Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine
  • Faculty of Pain Medicine
Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH, 1996[5])
College of Emergency Medicine (CEM, 2006) - Granted a Royal Charter in 2008.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "International Forum". Academy of Medical Royal Colleges. Retrieved 25 May 2014. 
  2. ^ "RCGP International". Royal College of General Practitioners. Retrieved 26 May 2014. 
  3. ^ "Royal Patronage and Title "Royal"". Government of Canada. 7 April 2014. Retrieved 31 May 2014. 
  4. ^ Louis Kuo Tai Fu (2000)The origins of surgery. 2: From barbers to surgeons Annals of the College of Surgeons Hong Kong 4 (1), 35–49. doi:10.1046/j.1442-2034.2000.00029.x
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "History of the Academy". Academy of Medical Royal Colleges. Archived from the original on 8 December 2007. Retrieved 17 June 2007. 
  6. ^ "List of Civilian Organizations with the Title Royal". Government of Canada. Retrieved 31 May 2014. 
  7. ^ "History of the RACGP". Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Retrieved 31 May 2014. 
  8. ^ "History of the College". Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners. Retrieved 31 May 2014. 

External links[edit]