Medina, New York

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Coordinates: 43°13′13″N 78°23′12″W / 43.22028°N 78.38667°W / 43.22028; -78.38667
Medina
Village
Medina 2008-01-01 002.JPG
Main and Center Street junction
Country USA
State New York
Region Western New York
County Orleans
Towns Ridgeway, Shelby
Landmark Erie Canal
River Oak Orchard Creek
Center Main and Center streets
 - elevation 525 ft (160 m)
 - coordinates 43°13′13″N 78°23′12″W / 43.22028°N 78.38667°W / 43.22028; -78.38667
Highest point S border of village near SW corner along NY 31
 - elevation 590 ft (180 m)
 - coordinates 43°12′24″N 78°24′15″W / 43.20667°N 78.40417°W / 43.20667; -78.40417
Lowest point Glenwood Lake
 - elevation 453 ft (138 m)
 - coordinates 43°14′00″N 78°23′21″W / 43.23333°N 78.38917°W / 43.23333; -78.38917
Area 3.3 sq mi (9 km2)
 - water 0.1 sq mi (0 km2)
Population 6,065 (2010)
Settled 1817
 - Incorporated 1832
Government City Hall
 - location 600 Main St.
 - elevation 542 ft (165 m)
 - coordinates 43°13′07″N 78°23′14″W / 43.21861°N 78.38722°W / 43.21861; -78.38722
Mayor Andrew Meier
Timezone EST (UTC-5)
 - summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP Code 14103
Area code 585
Exchange 798
FIPS code 36-46415
GNIS feature ID 0956905
Location of Medina within New York
Wikimedia Commons: Medina, New York
Website: www.VillageMedina.org

Medina is a village in the towns of Shelby and Ridgeway in Orleans County, New York, United States. The population was 6,065 at the 2010 census, making it the second most populous municipality in the county after Albion, the county seat. The village was named by its surveyor. It is part of the Rochester Metropolitan Statistical Area.

It developed from a stopover on the Erie Canal, which bends as it passes through the village, creating a basin that served as a stopover point. Mills on Oak Orchard Creek provided water power, and the fertile lands around it gave it fruit to export via the canal. At the start of the 20th century, the village was a thriving industrial town.

A branch campus of Genesee Community College is located in Medina.

History[edit]

Joseph Ellicott, the agent of the Holland Land Company, once owned land that encompassed part of the village.

Prosperity began around 1825 when the Erie Canal opened passing through Medina.

The Village of Medina was incorporated in 1832, creating an entity contained within the two towns.

Although the village board has begun merging functions, Medina has determined to remain an incorporated village.

The Main Street Historic District, Medina Armory, and United States Post Office are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[1] The Payjack Chevrolet Building was added in 2012.

Geography[edit]

Medina is located at 43°13′11″N 78°23′24″W / 43.21972°N 78.39000°W / 43.21972; -78.39000 (43.219808, -78.390101).[2]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 3.3 square miles (8.5 km2), of which 3.3 square miles (8.5 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (2.39%) is water.

Medina lies at the junction of east-west highway NYS Route 31 and north-south highway NYS Route 63. In addition, Medina marks the location where NYS Route 31E and NYS Route 31A split off from NY-31.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 6,415 people, 2,567 households, and 1,576 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,962.1 people per square mile (757.4/km²). There were 2,796 housing units at an average density of 855.2 per square mile (330.1/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 87.89% White, 7.56% African American, 0.59% Native American, 0.56% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.62% from other races, and 1.75% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.83% of the population.

There were 2,567 households out of which 31.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.3% were married couples living together, 15.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.6% were non-families. 32.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the village the population was spread out with 26.9% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 20.0% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 83.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.3 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $30,300, and the median income for a family was $37,857. Males had a median income of $31,857 versus $21,633 for females. The per capita income for the village was $16,138. About 13.0% of families and 16.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.7% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.

Additional facts[edit]

"Church In The Middle of the Street" made of Medina Sandstone

Medina is known for its "Medina sandstone" a brown stone used widely in buildings in the region.[4]

In May 2006, New York Governor George Pataki announced the construction of the first ethanol plant in the Northeastern United States. The plant began receiving deliveries of corn in October 2007[5] and was expected to start production in November 2007.[6] Partial production began shortly thereafter and full production was announced by GreenShift Corporation on February 25, 2008.[7] Since that time, the Western New York Energy, LLC plant has been in production processing significant portions of the local corn crop.[8]

Medina is in Ripley's Believe it or Not for St. John's Episcopal Church which is the "Church in the Middle of the Road"[9] and the Culvert, which is the only place in which a road passes under the Erie Canal.[10]

Medina is home to the Medina Railroad Museum, one of the largest railroad and toy train museums in New York.

One of the oldest homes in Medina exists at 224 Eagle Street, a block from the Erie canal, on the north side of town. This home was built in the early 1820s and was purchased by the Burnam family in the 1830s. It stayed in the family's possession until around 1984. The house was torn down in 2012.

Notable peeps fo shizzle[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]