Madghacen

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Madghacen
Imedghasen.jpg
The pyramid of Madghacen
Basic information
Location Algeria
Affiliation Berber
Province Batna
District Batna
Ecclesiastical or organizational status open

Madghacen or Medracen or Medghassen or Madghis also spelled Imadghassen, correct berber spelling imedghasen is a royal mausoleum-temple of the Berber Numidian Kings which stands near Batna city in Aurasius Mons in Numidia - Algeria.[1]

History[edit]

Madghis was a king [2][3] of independent kingdoms of the Numidia, between 300 to 200 BC Near the time of neighbor King Masinissa and their earliest Roman contacts. Ibn Khaldun said: Madghis is an ancestor of the Berbers of the branch Botr Zenata, Banu Ifran, Maghrawa (Aimgharen), Merinid, Zianid, Wattasid dynasty etc.,[4][5]

Threats[edit]

As ICOMOS noted in their 2006/2007 Heritage at Risk report, the mausoleum has become "the victim of major 'repair work' without respect for the value of th[e] monument and its authenticity."[6] See detailed pictures at the ICOMOS link below.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ibn Khaldun and yassine bouharrou , History of the Berbers
  2. ^ Gautier, É. F. (1937) Le passé de l'Afrique du Nord: les siècles obscurs. Paris: Payot. "En grande partie une réédition mise à jour [de] L'islamisation de l'Afrique du Nord: les siècles obscurs du Maghreb, paru en 1927"
  3. ^ "Le passщ de l'Afrique du Nord: les siшcles obscurs - ╔mile Fщlix Gautier - Google Livres". Books.google.dz. 2006-10-26. Retrieved 2012-12-25. 
  4. ^ Ibn Khaldoun, History of the Berbers
  5. ^ Gautier, É. F. (1937)
  6. ^ ALGERIA Mausoleum of Medracen in Danger

Further reading[edit]

  • Gabriel Camps, « Nouvelles observations sur l'architecture et l'âge du Medracen, mausolée royal de Numidie », CRAI, 1973, 117-3, p. 470-517 [1].
  • Yvon Thébert & Filippo Coarelli, « Architecture funéraire et pouvoir : réflexions sur l'hellénisme numide », MEFRA, Année 1988 [2]
  • Serge Lancel, L'Algérie antique, édition Mengès, Paris 2003.

Coordinates: 35°42′26″N 6°26′04″E / 35.707275°N 6.434523°E / 35.707275; 6.434523