Mehmet Konica

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Mehmet bey Konica
Mehmet Konica, Albanian Foreign Minister.jpg
Born 1881
Konitsa, Janina Vilayet, Ottoman Empire
Died 1948
Rome, Italy
Occupation Politician
Known for Foreign Minister of Albania
Congress of Durrës
Congress of Lushnje

Mehmet Konica (1881 – 1948), also known as Mehmet Konitsa, was an Albanian politician. He served three times as the Foreign Minister of Albania. He was the brother of Albanian writer Faik Konica.

Konica was born in Konitsa, today's Greece, back then part of the Janina Vilayet of the Ottoman Empire. He was present in the Conference of Ambassadors in London in 1913.[1] He was appointed Foreign Minister on 22 June 1914 for a short period. In 1918, he headed the Congress of Durrës and served again as Foreign Minister.[2] After participating in the Congress of Lushnjë, he was appointed Foreign Minister once more and accompanied Fan Noli on his journey to the League of Nations.[3] On 28 March 1922 he was appointed plenipotentiary Ambassador of Albania in the UK[4] until 21 May 1925.[5] Although originally an opponent of Ahmet Zogu, Mehmet conducted negotiations in Rome on his behalf in 1926. He served thereafter as an informal political advisor and intermediary and represented Albania at the Balkan Conferences of 1931.[6]
During World War II, Mehmet bey Konica was initially interned in Rome by the Italians and, later, under the German occupation, was appointed Albanian Foreign Minister but refused to take up the position. He died in exile in Rome.[6]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Albania and King Zog: independence, republic and monarchy 1908-1939 By Owen Pearson Page 37 ([1])
  2. ^ *Constantin Anastas Chekrezi, ed. (February 1919). "The Provisional Albanian Government - Hail, Free Albania!". The Adriatic Review (Boston, MA: Vatra) 1 (5-6): 186. Retrieved 2013-12-16. 
  3. ^ Lufta e popullit shqiptar per çlirimin kombetar, 1918-1920 ..., Volume 2 By Muin Çami page 64 ([2])
  4. ^ Albania and King Zog: independence, republic and monarchy 1908-1939 By Owen Pearson Page 192 ([3])
  5. ^ Albania and King Zog: independence, republic and monarchy 1908-1939 By Owen Pearson Page 247 ([4])
  6. ^ a b Robert Elsie, Historical Dictionary of Albania, Historical Dictionaries of Europe 75 (2 ed.), Scarecrow Press, p. 241, ISBN 978-0810861886