Meitner–Hupfeld effect

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Meitner–Hupfeld effect is an anomalously large scattering of Gamma rays by heavy elements. Later on, the Meitner–Hupfeld effect was explained by a broad theory from which evolved the Standard Model, a theory for explaining the structure of the atomic nucleus. The anomalous gamma-ray behavior was eventually ascribed to electron–positron pair production and annihilation.

Although Professor Meitner was recognized for her work,[1] Dr. Hupfeld is usually ignored, and little or no account of his life exists.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brown LM, Moyer DF (1984). "Lady or tiger?—The Meitner–Hupfeld effect and Heisenberg's neutron theory". American Journal of Physics 52 (2): 130–136. Bibcode:1984AmJPh..52..130B. doi:10.1119/1.13920.